Opportunities

Section 1

Content

Jobs

Acquisitions Editor or Acquisitions Editor Associate

Job Posting: Acquisitions Editor or Acquisitions Editor Associate
Academic Studies Press (Boston, MA)


Academic Studies Press is seeking candidates for the position of Acquisitions Editor or Acquisitions Editor Associate.


The Acquisitions Editor or Acquisitions Editor Associate will be responsible for acquiring scholarly and academic titles in Slavic and Eurasian Studies.

Candidates should have a PhD in Slavic or Eurasian Studies or a related field. Preference will be given to a candidate with editorial experience and a record of acquisitions, extensive contacts with a wide array of potential authors, and fluency in the critical literature of and the newest developments in these fields. Experience in securing funding for books requiring subsidies is desirable. The successful candidate for this position will work with the Director of the Press to design a focused publishing program, taking into consideration the best opportunities in these fields, as well as the candidate’s interests, professional training, and publishing experience.

 The Acquisitions Editor or Acquisition Editor Associate  will carry out the following responsibilities:

  • Solicit and evaluate book proposals and manuscripts in the above stated areas
  • Solicit, evaluate, and process reports from peer reviewers 
  • Present proposed books to the Director of Press 
  • Negotiate contracts 
  • Prepare accurate budgets for books acquired
  • Identify and secure funding for books requiring subsidies 
  • Maintain accurate and timely schedules for transmittal of manuscripts to production
  • Actively participate in sales and marketing plans for promoting publications

Salary commensurate with experience and the level of appointment with designated responsibilities. Please send resume and cover letter to the Director at igor.nemirovsky@academicstudiespress.com.

Date Posted: Tue, 28 Mar 2017

One-Year Russian Lectureship @ UNC-Chapel Hill

One-Year Lecturer in Russian
 
The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (http://gsll.unc.edu/) is seeking a superior and innovative instructor for Russian language,literature, and culture courses for a non- renewable fixed-term lectureship in Russian, a one-year appointment beginning July 1, 2017. The successful candidate will carry a full-time, 3/3 teaching load. Ph.D. in any field of Russian language, literature, and/or culture by time of appointment. Candidates are expected to have familiarity with the methods and technologies used in teaching the Russian language at the college level. Native or near-native proficiency in Russian and English required.
 
Applicants must apply online at http://unc.peopleadmin.com/postings/116852 and upload: 1) a letter of application; 2) a CV; 3) a statement of teaching philosophy (1-2 pages); and 4) a sample of scholarly work (15-20 pages). Additional materials may be requested at a later date.
 
At the time of application, candidates will also be required to identify the names, titles, and email addresses of four professional references, two of whom must be prepared to discuss the applicant’s teaching in detail. At the time when applicants are selected for interviews, recommenders identified by the applicant will be contacted via email with instructions for uploading their letters of support. Alternatively, applicants may list Interfolio as a reference and the application system will solicit recommendations directly from Interfolio. Please see http://help.interfolio.com/entries/24062742-Uploading-Letters-to-an-Online-Application-System for instructions.
 
Questions should be addressed to Dr. Radislav Lapushin at lapushin@email.unc.edu 
 
 Open until filled; review of applications will begin on April 15, 2017.
 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, color, disability, gender, gender expression, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or status as a protected veteran.
Date Posted: Tue, 28 Mar 2017

3-Year Visiting Assistant Professor of Russian at Swarthmore College

Swarthmore College invites applications to fill a three-year position as Visiting Assistant Professor of Russian, with possibility of renewal for another three years, beginning Fall 2017. Teaching load is 2/3. Specialization in any area of Russian literature and culture; candidates with expertise in 19th-century prose, theater studies, visual culture, interdisciplinary studies, and/or a West Slavic or Central Asian language and literature might be especially attractive. Essential qualifications include: native or near-native proficiency in both English and Russian, commitment to undergraduate education, lively classroom presence, experience teaching language and literature/culture in North America at the university level, evidence of scholarly promise, PhD in hand by August 2017 required.

Please ​apply by using the following link: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/9002

If it is impossible to use this link, send cover letter, CV, graduate transcript, and the names and contact information of three recommenders to:

Sibelan Forrester
Chair, Russian Search Committee
Dept. of Modern Languages and Literatures
Swarthmore College
500 College Ave.
Swarthmore, PA  19081-1390

Review of applications will begin on March 31 and continue until position is filled.

Swarthmore College has a strong institutional commitment to excellence through diversity in its educational program and employment. The College actively seeks and welcomes applications from candidates with diverse backgrounds including those who have intercultural experience and those with demonstrable commitments to an inclusive society and world.

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

Russian Lecturer at The Ohio State University

Lecturer in Russian.
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH)


The Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures at The Ohio State University welcomes applications for a one year position as Lecturer in Russian with a possibility of renewal to begin August 22, 2017. We are seeking a broadly-trained colleague in Russian able to teach at all levels of language, including advanced. Preference will be given to the candidates with a PhD in hand at a time of appointment, but those who are ABD or hold a master’s degree will also be considered. Additional fields of expertise are open, but interest in innovative and interdisciplinary approaches is preferred (for example, digital humanities, global studies or environmental studies). Native or near-native fluency in Russian and English is expected.


 Please submit a cover letter explaining interests in and qualifications for the position, a curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, a statement of teaching philosophy, and recent evaluations for two or more language courses.


Applications received by April 10, 2017 will receive full attention. Decision is expected to be made by end of April. For further information, please contact Larysa Stepanova, Language Program Director (stepanova.1@osu.edu).
Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

Spurlock Museum Seeks Director

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign seeks nominations and applications for the position of Director, Spurlock Museum (Spurlock). The next director will be a creative and visionary leader with a strong commitment to building a dynamic, inclusive, and collaborative environment that increasingly impacts the campus, community, and national constituencies that Spurlock serves.

Position Overview

The director leads and supports a dedicated professional staff of 18 full-time equivalent employees in the generation of new scholarship and creative work that engages the campus and raises the external profile of the museum. S/he is committed to interdisciplinary academic collaboration and is an energetic partner in the exploration of ideas and issues on local, regional, national, and global levels. The director guides the development and implementation of innovative education museum initiatives and public programs that engage a broad public audience and provide a dynamic forum for cultural inquiry. S/he fosters an environment of collaboration, mutual respect, and teamwork while demonstrating a strong commitment to diversity, inclusion, and equity as a core value of the museum.

The director provides strategic leadership for Spurlock, ensuring that the institution’s mission is clearly understood and that its objectives are fully articulated and effectively pursued. As the chief administrative officer of the museum, the director is responsible for all aspects of its operations and management, including fiscal and personnel management and providing oversight of the museum concerning campus and college policies and procedures. S/he directs policy for the museum, serving as an advocate for the knowledge that can be gained from the direct experience of artifacts and for the various means by which the museum can support the educational mission of the university. Working closely with other academic and administrative departments on campus, the director represents the museum to various external constituencies, most notably alumni, and public audiences throughout the region, and the museum profession at large. The director cultivates donors and works aggressively to secure funding from individuals, foundations, corporations, and governmental agencies, while following University policies and regulations.

Position Requirements and Qualifications

The committee is seeking candidates who demonstrate the following:

  • knowledge of museum best practices
  • an open and collaborative approach to management
  • excellent interpersonal skills working with a diverse population
  • a strong record of success in donor relations and fundraising
  • the skills to create a stimulating, and productive work environment
  • an interest/ability to work well in an academic/research environment and make creative connections with faculty and students as well as community partners, including K–12 schools
  • excellent verbal and written communication skills

The qualified candidate will have 5 or more years of leadership experience in a museum. Experience in an academic environment is preferred. A PhD degree in history, anthropology, classics, or a related area is preferred, but qualified candidates with a Master’s degree will be considered.

This full-time academic professional position has a 12-month appointment and a negotiable start date. The full compensation package is based on qualifications and experience. If the individual selected to serve as director is additionally qualified to hold faculty status, then consideration will be made for a zero percent time non-tenured faculty appointment.

Application Procedure

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign invites letters of nomination or application (letter of interest, resume/CV, and five references). Applications and nominations will be accepted until the position is filled, and review of applications will begin immediately. Interested candidates are encouraged to submit materials prior to Friday, March 31, 2017. All inquiries, nominations/referrals, and applications should be sent electronically to:

Kathleen Harleman, Interim Dean, College of Fine and Applied Arts
Search Committee Chair

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

Lecturer Position: Russian language, literature and culture (University of Hawaii, Mānoa)

Lecturer (Russian). Original ad here: http://workatuh.hawaii.edu/Jobs/NAdvert/24665/4278397/1/postdate/desc

Hiring Unit: College of Lang, Ling and Lit, Russian Division of the Department of Lang and Lit of Europe and the Americas, University of Hawaii, Mānoa

Salary commensurate with experience.

Other Conditions:

One-year appointment for Academic Year (Fall 2017 & Spring 2018). Contingent on approval, position clearance, availability of funds, and sufficient enrollment.

Duties and Responsibilities

  1. Teach undergraduate courses in Russian language, literature and culture, and, in English, Russian literature, culture and translation classes.
  2. Teaching load: Up to 12 credits (4 courses) per semester.

Minimum Qualifications

  1. M.A. or equivalent degree in Russian;
  2. High Level proficiency in Russian and English
  3. Experience teaching Russian in the USA at the college/university level

Desirable Qualifications

  1. Ph.D., in Russian or equivalent (ABD will be considered; must have degree in hand by 07/31/2017.)
  2. Evidence of student-oriented and innovative instruction.
  3. Scholarly publication and participation in national professional organizations encouraged, but not required for appointment.

To Apply: 

Email your application materials in a pdf file to llea464@hawaii.edu with Subject Line “Russian” plus your last name: RussianAnderson.  Include your letter of application, curriculum vitae, complete sets of recent student evaluations, official graduate transcripts (copies acceptable at time of application, however, original transcripts upon hire) and the email and phone contact information for three references. Describe in your letter of application the courses taught previously in Russian and in English translation, as well as courses you are prepared to teach.

Inquiries: 

Dr. Anastasia Kostetskaya, Russian Chair; kostestk@hawaii.edu. Russian Chair, Department of Languages & Literatures of Europe & the Americas.

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

Summer Resident Director Position: Intensive Russian Program in Narva, Estonia - June-Aug. 2017 (University of Pittsburgh, CREES)

The University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Russian and East European Studies (REES) is seeking a qualified Resident Director (RD) to accompany a group of undergraduates to Narva, Estonia this summer.  The program runs for 8 weeks—from June 18 – August 13, 2017—though the RD will likely need to arrive one week before the students.  While in Narva, the students will engage in the intensive study of Russian at the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th-year levels.  In addition to formal class time, students participate in a comprehensive set of lectures and excursions.

The RD receives a generous salary as well as roundtrip airfare to Narva, Estonia, accommodations in Narva, daily breakfasts (7 days a week), and work-day lunches (5 days a week).

Primary responsibilities of the Resident Directorship include:
·         Attend all pre-departure orientation sessions conducted by the University of Pittsburgh for participating students; participation via Skype is fine.
·         Run in-country orientation with entire group of students upon group’s arrival to Narva, Estonia.
·         Enforce a Russian-only language policy while students are on campus and on all program-related excursions, lectures, and activities; actively encourage students and all program staff (including staff at the College with whom students have frequent interaction) to speak only in Russian.  Actively converse with the students in the target language at all times, but especially during coffee breaks, group meals, excursions, etc.
·         While in country, liaising with primary point of contact at Narva College of University of Tartu to ensure all program components are being carried through.
·         Organize and facilitate all pre- and post-program proficiency tests.  Help administer all required language proficiency exams (i.e., OPIs and the American Councils for International Education reading and listening exams) during the final week of the program.  All tests will be conducted online.  Coordinate as necessary with Narva College staff to schedule use of computers.
·         Attend and help to arrange (as needed) all excursions, lectures, and out-of-class activities.
·         Submit weekly reports to the REES Associate Director detailing all events of the week, including any student illnesses, disciplinary matters, or other concerns.
·         You must have a cell phone that is operational 24/7.  You must distribute your number to all students, all program instructors and administrators, and be on-call.
·         Prepare students for all program-related excursions and lectures, accompany students on all program-related excursions and at lectures, and run regular debriefing sessions with the students following excursions and lectures.
·         During the third week of classes, hold a meeting with each student to check-in on his/her progress both academically and socially.  Make recommendations to the student to increase his/her success in the program as needed.
·         Be available for student consultations as needed outside regular class time.

Competitive applicants will have experience with study abroad programming, a minimum of advanced-level Russian language proficiency, and past work experience that provides evidence of superior organizational and communication skills.

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until the position is filled.

Please send a cover-letter, CV, and names and contact information of two professional references who can speak to your qualifications for this position to Dawn Seckler (dawn.seckler@pitt.edu).

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Feb 2017

Temporary Lecturer Position: Ukrainian (University of California, Berkeley)

Lecturer Pool - Russian Language, Literature, Culture; Ukrainian Language - Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures


The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of California, Berkeley invites applications for a pool of qualified temporary instructors to teach courses in Russian Language, Literature and Culture and/or in Ukrainian Language, subject to the needs and budget of the Department. Positions may be available as early as Fall semester 2017, but applications will be accepted through February 14, 2018 to fill ongoing needs if they arise. For more information, including possible course topics, required qualifications and application materials, please visit https://aprecruit.berkeley.edu/apply/JPF01279 With questions, please contact ISSAHR@berkeley.edu. UC Berkeley is an AA/EEO employer.

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Feb 2017

Internships

Undergraduate Internship at The Odyssey Project

Undergraduate Internship at The Odyssey Project, AY 2017-18
A Humanities Gateway to the Community Initiative
 
The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH) is offering an hourly paid internship at the Odyssey Project, a collaborative venture with the Urbana Adult Education Center and Illinois Humanities, the state Humanities Council. The Odyssey Project is a free, 32-week college-credit granting humanities program for income-eligible adults with limited to no access to higher education. For more information see http://www.iprh.illinois.edu/programs/odyssey.html. It is founded on the Clemente Course in the Humanities model, which was awarded a National Humanities Medal of Honor in 2014.
 
The internship is designed to provide tutorial assistance that will enhance the learning and study skills of Odyssey students. Odyssey classes meet Monday and Wednesday evenings in downtown Urbana from 6-8pm. The intern will provide tutorial services one night (two hours) per a week at a rate of $15.75 per hour. To be considered for this internship, candidates must possess strong writing, communications, and critical thinking skills, a personable and patient matter, and ease in interpersonal relations. Experience with tutoring recommended but not required.
 
Dr. Samuel Byndom, director of the Odyssey Project and of the Urbana Adult Education Center, will supervise.
 
Applications are being accepted now for Fall 2017. Please send a one page cv, a two page letter of application and the names and contact information for two references to Antoinette Burton at iprh@illinois.edu. Please put “Odyssey Internship” in the subject line.
 
Applicants must be full-time University of Illinois undergraduates in good standing whose major is in a humanities unit.
 
The deadline for applications is May 1 2017.
 
This internship is available thanks to the generous support of donors to the Odyssey Project, including those who bought raffle tickets on the occasion of Odyssey 10 anniversary at Illinois in Fall of 2016. We thank everyone who helps to make the Odyssey Project possible.
Date Posted: Tue, 28 Mar 2017

Career-Focused Summer Internship in Russia

The deadline for CrossroadsEurasia summer internships in Russia has been extended to March 30, 2017.


Please let your students know about this
career-focused summer work experience.
Students can choose one of three options:
  • Camp counseling. One of the best introductions to Russia one can have. Best for beginners of the language, looking for a friendly and structured atmosphere.
  • Teaching English. Highly immersive and flexible, with coaching by local teachers. Similar in style to well-known overseas programs for recent graduates. Recommended for heritage speakers, and those students with at least intermediate level of Russian.
  • Translation. As close as students will come to actually working in Russia. We recommend it both to students interested in translation specifically as well as advanced or heritage speakers, looking for an experience like no other.
Post-program, students receive career coaching to help them communicate the value of the experience, and an alumni network can inform their next career steps.  
Internships are located in places where the pace of life is slower -- Kostroma, Voronezh, and Ryazan. In every location, students spend time with locals and come away with some genuine friendships. Every city has a local coordinator.
Accommodations, meals, visa support and travel assistance is provided.
More information is available on our website at: www.CrossroadsEurasia.com. If you or your students have any questions, please contact me at vgorshkov@crossroadseurasia.com
Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

Funding

Einstein Fellowship

Awarded by the Einstein Forum and the Daimler and Benz Foundation

The Einstein Forum and the Daimler and Benz Foundation are offering a fellowship for outstanding young thinkers who wish to pursue a project in a different field from that of their previous research. The purpose of the fellowship is to support those who, in addition to producing superb work in their area of specialization, are also open to other, interdisciplinary approaches – following the example set by Albert Einstein.

The fellowship includes living accommodations for five to six months in the garden cottage of Einstein`s own summerhouse in Caputh, Brandenburg, only a short distance away from the universities and academic institutions of Potsdam and Berlin. The fellow will receive a stipend of EUR 10,000 and reimbursement of travel expenses.

Call for Applications

Candidates must be under 35 and hold a university degree in the humanities, in the social sciences, or in the natural sciences. Applications for 2018 should include a CV, a two-page project proposal, and two letters of recommendation. All documents must be received by April 15, 2017.

At the end of the fellowship period, the fellow will be expected to present his or her project in a public lecture at the Einstein Forum and at the Daimler and Benz Foundation. The Einstein Fellowship is not intended for applicants who wish to complete an academic study they have already begun.
A successful application must demonstrate the quality, originality, and feasibility of the proposed project, as well as the superior intellectual development of the applicant. It is not relevant whether the applicant has begun working toward, or currently holds, a PhD.

PLEASE NOTE THAT NO FELLOWSHIPS WILL BE GIVEN FOR DISSERTATION RESEARCH. THE PROPOSED PROJECT MUST BE SIGNIFICANTLY DIFFERENT IN CONTENT, AND PREFERABLY FIELD AND FORM, FROM THE APPLICANT’S PREVIOUS WORK.

Applications should be submitted by mail to: /
Bewerbungen sind zu richten an:

Prof. Dr. Susan Neiman
Einstein Forum
Am Neuen Markt 7
14467 Potsdam
Germany

Or by email to: fellowship@einsteinforum.de

For more information, call or fax the Einstein Forum at:
phone: +49-331-271780
fax: +49-331-2717827

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

IPRH Research Clusters, 2017-2018

Applications are due April 7, 2017 at 5:00 p.m.
 
The IPRH Research Clusters initiative enables faculty and graduate students in the humanities and arts from the University of Illinois campus to develop questions or subjects of inquiry that require or would be enhanced by collaborative work.
 
A cluster might come together around a project at the very start of its intellectual life; faculty might organize to test a proposition collectively that they have already begun to explore individually; or a cluster might arise from months or years of collaboration in order to realize an exhibit, a book project, a media platform. IPRH Research Cluster funds are designed to allow scholars with shared interests to explore complex subjects and grow ideas together which they might lack the resources to do on their own. 
 
We see the Research Clusters as opportunities not just for faculty leadership but mentorship as well. Faculty involvement should be robust and structured to facilitate the variety of career stages in the cluster.
 
Though modest, the level of support that the funds provide creates an opportunity for work in common and will ideally serve as seed money for future funding. Research Clusters need not necessarily be composed of scholars from multiple disciplines. Instead, this initiative is intended as a way to nurture collaborative faculty development—to help scholars from any discipline to think alongside colleagues old and new in order to generate new knowledge, experiment with novel forms of expression, or illuminate unlooked for pathways through an existing problem.
 
For 2017–18, IPRH will award funding to a maximum of six Research Clusters on a competitive basis. One Research Cluster award will be reserved for applicants whose work intersects with the public arts and humanities mission of Imagining America, and they will be encouraged to attend the Imagining America conference. For more information on Imagining America, see http://imaginingamerica.org/about/.
 
Successful applicants will receive grants of $2,500 to support their cluster’s activities. For full details about allowable use of these funds and more information about applying for IPRH Research Cluster funding, visit http://www.iprh.illinois.edu/programs/clusters.html.
Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

One Year Post-doctoral Research and Teaching Fellowship in Jewish Studies, Central European University

The application deadline has been extended to April 5, 2017. 

Starting date: September 2017

The Jewish Studies Program at the Central European University invites applications for a twelve-month teaching and research fellowship on a topic related to Jewish cultural and literary studies. The post-doctoral fellow will teach one course in the winter semester. The specific disciplinary and thematic areas of specialization are open, but preference will be given to candidates working on Western, Central and/or Eastern Europe, who can offer broad, thematic courses.

Duties and responsibilities:
In addition to teaching a two- or four-credit course, the post-doctoral Fellow is expected to engage with the life and activities of the faculty and students at Central European University.

Qualifications:
Applicants should have received their doctoral degrees after September 1, 2012, and should have a publication record appropriate to their career stage. There are no restrictions concerning citizenship, race, gender, or age. The deadline for applications is March 15, 2017. Current doctoral students must show evidence that they will successfully defend their dissertation before the start date of the fellowship.

Compensation:
We offer a competitive salary, as well as a dynamic and international academic environment.

How to apply?
Applicants need to submit:
• Academic CV
• Writing sample or representative publication
• Research proposal with an abstract
• Sample syllabus
• Contact information for two referees.

For pre-application inquiries, please contact Daniel Rapp at RappD@ceu.edu

Please send your complete application package to:
advert@ceu.edu - including job code in subject line: 2017/030

CEU is an equal opportunity employer.

About CEU
Central European University (CEU) is a graduate research-intensive university specializing in the social sciences and humanities, public policy and management. It is located in Budapest, and accredited in the United States and Hungary. CEU's mission is to promote academic excellence, state-of-the-art research, and civic engagement, in order to contribute to the development of open societies in Central and Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, and other emerging democracies throughout the world. CEU offers both Master's and doctoral programs, and enrolls more than 1400 students from 100 countries. The teaching staff consists of more than 180 resident faculty, from over 40 countries, and a large number of prominent visiting scholars from around the world.
The language of instruction is English.

For more information on the Central European University, please visit www.ceu.edu

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Washington University in St. Louis

The Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department at Washington University in St. Louis seeks to fill a two-year post-doctoral appointment to begin in the 2017-18 academic year in the field of gender and sexuality studies.  We are particularly interested in scholars who have training in social science methodologies and whose work engages one of the following fields:  Ethnic Studies, Latin American Studies, African Studies, Asian Studies, or transnational studies.

The responsibilities of this appointment include teaching one course per semester, participating in the scholarly community, and pursuing an active program of research.

Applicants should send a letter of interest describing their scholarly qualifications and research goals for the postdoctoral period; current curriculum vitae; a published article or dissertation chapter; and three (3) letters of recommendation.

Washington University especially encourages applications from women, members of ethnic minority groups, and disabled individuals.  Applicants must be eligible to work in the United States and have received the doctorate after July 1, 2012 and before July 1, 2017.  Applications should be sent to Mary Ann Dzuback, Chair, WGSS Search Committee, c/o Donna Kepley (wgss@wustl.edu). The committee will review applications until the position is filled, but priority will be given to those received by April 1, 2017.

https://wgss.artsci.wustl.edu/

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

Postdoctoral Fellowship in European Politics and Political Economy, MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, Yale University

Yale University MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies is seeking a postdoctoral fellow with strong economics training and quantitative methods to work with Yale faculty in analyzing regulation, employment practices, and market outcomes for OECD countries. The Post-Doctoral Associate will spend fifty percent of his or her time working on this project and the other fifty percent pursuing their own research.

The fellowship will run for ten months starting on either July 1 or August 1 of 2017, during which time the incumbent will be resident in the New Haven area and ineligible to accept paid employment elsewhere.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, CV, one page description of research plans, and have two letters of recommendation sent to Lourdes Haynes (lourdes.haynes@yale.edu). Compensation includes a salary of $65,000, health insurance, and other benefits afforded to postdoctoral associates at Yale https://your.yale.edu/work-yale/benefits/my-benefits-yale/postdoctoral-associate-benefits .

We will begin considering applications on March 15, 2017 and continue reviewing applications until an appointment has been made.

Yale is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. Applications from women, persons with disabilities, protected veterans, and underrepresented minorities are welcome.

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Geography, Lawrence University

Lawrence University’s NEH Humanities Institute invites applications for a two-year postdoctoral fellowship position in Geography beginning September 1, 2017. A Ph.D. in hand is preferred but an ABD will be considered as well. The fellow contributes to the intellectual life of the university by participating in a year-long, interdisciplinary faculty seminar entitled, “The Pursuit of a Good Life: Fantasy, Failure, Fate?” The seminar has a special interest in a geographer’s perspective on interactions between our efforts to live a good life and the natural environment.

The fellow also contributes to the intellectual life of the university by teaching three courses per year (one course each in Fall, Winter, and Spring terms), which would include a range of courses from the fellow’s areas of expertise as well as Lawrence University’s signature Freshman Studies program. The specialization is open but expertise in Asia, Africa, or the Middle East as well as the ability to develop courses that would complement our interdisciplinary programs of Global Studies and/or Environmental Studies would be ideal. Experience teaching as well as a commitment to liberal arts education is preferred.

To apply, go to https://lawrencecareers.silkroad.com and submit a letter of application, a curriculum vitae, a writing sample, and two sample syllabi. Three letters of reference should also be sent to search_humanitiesinstitute@lawrence.edu. Applications should be received by March 30, 2017 to receive fullest consideration, but will be accepted until the position is filled. Aside from an annual salary, the position includes health insurance benefits and a modest allowance for conference/research expenses. Please contact Lena Khor, Director of the NEH Humanities Institute, if you have questions about the position (lena.l.khor@lawrence.edu).

Lawrence University, located in Appleton, Wisconsin, is a highly selective undergraduate liberal arts college and conservatory of music, known for the quality of both its classroom and tutorial education, research opportunities for undergraduates, and faculty of teacher/scholars and teacher/artists. Founded in 1847, Lawrence is a community of 1,500 intellectually curious students that bring a diversity of experience and thought from nearly every state and 50 countries outside the U.S.

Lawrence University is committed to enhancing the diversity of its faculty and the diversity of viewpoints and approaches that the faculty represents.  Candidates are encouraged to read more about Lawrence at https://lawrencecareers.silkroad.com/lawrenceuniversity/About_Us.html and to address in their letters of application the ways in which they could contribute to Lawrence’s institutional mission and goals.  This website also includes informational resources about the University and the surrounding community.

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

American Research Center in Sofia (ARCS) Postdoctoral Residential Research Opportunity

THE PROGRAM: The American Research Center in Sofia (www.arcsofia.org) announces a six-month ARCS Postdoctoral Scholars Residential Research Opportunity for scholars currently teaching at an American institution of higher education or independent scholars in the USA, who have received their PhD within the last ten years (2007-2017) and are US citizens or non-citizens with at least three years of residence in the US.

In accordance with the mission of ARCS, the Residential Research is open to candidates whose research focuses on any aspect of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Bulgaria and the six other countries we serve from antiquity to the present day. In addition to conducting her/his research based at ARCS, the Postdoctoral Scholar will contribute to the academic program of ARCS by presenting a small number of lectures and seminars and organizing one regional workshop/conference. The ARCS Residential Research provides 24/7 access to the ARCS Library, access to ARCS resources and expertise. The program includes accommodation in shared rooms in the ARCS hostel. The ARCS Postdoctoral Scholar should secure funding to cover their travel expenses between their home country and Bulgaria.  

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Please complete the application form, renaming it to include your surname, and send it electronically as a PDF. Make sure to include a CV and a Project Description as Microsoft Word documents or as PDFs. Two letters from scholars in the field, commenting on the value and feasibility of the project, should be submitted directly (by the scholars) as Word documents or PDFs. All application materials must be in English and PDFs must be emailed to Dr. Dilyana Ivanova (usadmin@arcsofia.org). The application deadline for this competition is April 10, 2017.

Please direct any question about the fellowship program to Dr. Ivanova, Chief Administrator of ARCS, or Dr. Emil Nankov, Academic Coordinator of ARCS (apo@arcsofia.org).

For more information, see http://arcsofia.org/node/650/.

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

American Research Center in Sofia (ARCS) Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for U.S.-Based Students

THE PROGRAM: The American Research Center in Sofia Foundation invites applications for its 2017–2018 Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for US-based Students.

The duration of the fellowships is 9 months (September–May) or 3 months (September–November or February–April). In addition to independent research, fellows will participate in the academic program of ARCS, which includes a Lecture Series designed to provide a broad thematic vision of Bulgarian and Balkan history and culture from prehistory to the present day. Fellows receive free housing in shared rooms in the ARCS hostel. Fellows should secure funding to cover their travel expenses between North America and Bulgaria. 

This fellowship can be combined with another fellowship; however, you must notify ARCS, and we will negotiate the terms of the ARCS Fellowship. We strongly encourage you to inquire about possibilities for funding from your home institution in a timely manner and to indicate this in your application.

ELIGIBILITY: Applicants must be graduate students of any citizenship enrolled in North American academic institutions or academic institutions accredited in North America, who are engaged in research in the humanities and/or social sciences with a focus on Bulgaria or the Balkan Peninsula (antiquity through modern day). APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Please complete the application form, renaming it to include your surname, and send it electronically as a PDF. Make sure to include a CV and a Project Description as Microsoft Word documents or as PDFs. University transcripts should also be sent electronically, and two letters from scholars in the field, commenting on the value and feasibility of the project, should be submitted directly (by the scholars) as Word documents or PDFs. All application materials must be in English and must be emailed to the ARCS Fellowship Committee at usadmin@arcsofia.org. The application deadline for this competition is April 10, 2017.

Please direct any question about the fellowship program to Dr. Emil Nankov, Academic Coordinator of ARCS, apo@arcsofia.org.

For more information, see http://arcsofia.org/node/359/.

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

American Research Center in Sofia (ARCS) Residential Fellowship for Southeast European Scholars

THE PROGRAM: The American Research Center in Sofia Foundation invites applications for its Residential Fellowship for Southeast European Scholars. This 3-month fellowship is available to PhD candidates and junior postdoctoral scholars whose research specialties are in archaeology, history, art/architectural history, urban studies, cultural anthropology/ethnography, museum studies, or cultural heritage management with a geographic focus on the Balkans (prehistory to present day).

The Fellowship provides 24/7 access to the ARCS Library, access to ARCS resources and expertise, and involves participation in the ARCS Lecture Series. The fellowship includes accommodation in shared rooms in the ARCS hostel. Fellows should secure funding to cover their travel expenses between their home country and Bulgaria. The 3-month fellowship will take place from September 1 to November 30, 2017 or from February 1 to  April 30, 2018.

ELIGIBILITY: Applicants must be citizens of one of the seven countries of SE Europe which are served by ARCS: Bulgaria, Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro, the Republic of Macedonia, Romania, or Serbia. Pre-doctoral applicants must be enrolled in a PhD program in SE Europe. Postdoctoral applicants will have completed their degree in the last 8 years (2009 or later) and should hold a position or be independent researchers in SE Europe. English proficiency is required.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Please complete the application form, renaming it to include your surname, and send it electronically as a PDF. Make sure to include a CV and a Project Description as Microsoft Word documents or as PDFs. Two letters from scholars in the field, commenting on the value and feasibility of the project, should be submitted directly (by the scholars) as Word documents or PDFs. All application materials must be in English and must be emailed to Dr. Dilyana Ivanova (usadmin@arcsofia.org). The application deadline for this competition is April 10, 2017.

For more information, see http://arcsofia.org/node/342/.

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

ASEEES Dissertation Research Grants

Call for Applications: ASEEES Dissertation Research Grants, 2017-2018

Thanks to the generosity of donors and members, the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies is sponsoring up to ten grants annually, at a maximum of $5,000 each, for the purposes of conducting doctoral dissertation research in Eastern Europe and Eurasia in any aspect of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian studies in any discipline.  These awards may be held concurrently with other partial funding sources, but are intended to support students whose projects have not yet been fully supported. The grant recipient cannot concurrently hold the Cohen-Tucker Dissertation Research Fellowship, Fulbright-Hays DDRA, SSRC IDRF and other similarly fully-funded fellowships.  The grant is for primary dissertation research, not for dissertation write-up.

ELIGIBILITY
 -Applicant may be a graduate student of any nationality, in any discipline currently enrolled in a PhD program in the United States
-Applicant must have successfully achieved PhD candidacy (ABD status) by the start of the proposed research travel
-Applicant must have language proficiency to conduct the proposed research
-Applicant must be a student member of ASEEES at the time of application
-Applicant must plan to conduct research in one or more of countries within the region covered by ASEEES, including: Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyz Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan
-Applicant must plan to start the research travel within the same calendar year following the receipt of the fellowship (Ex: Upon notification of the fellowship in the summer of 2017, the grant recipient must start his/her research travel no later than December 31, 2017)
-Applicant must not hold the Cohen-Tucker Dissertation Research Fellowship, Fulbright-Hays DDRA, SSRC IDRF and other similarly fully-funded fellowships for the same research project

GRANT AMOUNT
The grant amount is maximum $5,000, which must be used toward expenses outside the US conducting research in the eligible country or countries, listed above. NOTE: The fellowship does not support tuition and fee payments to the applicant’s US home institution.

DEADLINE
Applications must be submitted by April 30, 2017 (Notifications will be made by June 1, 2017)

TO APPLY
Complete the online application, which includes:
-a two-page, single-spaced, 1000-word description of the research scope, analytical framework, methodology, budget, and timeline;
-a CV no longer than two pages;
-Graduate transcript(s) (unofficial copy allowed);
-two letters of professional reference due May 6 (one must be from the main dissertation adviser);
-a section on the status of all grants to which one has applied for the research period and/or a statement of ineligibility for key funding opportunities. (Prior to disbursement of funds, ASEEES will contact the home department to verify candidate’s standing and funding levels.)
All files are reviewed by an interdisciplinary panel that values clarity of argument to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

CONTACT
Please contact aseees.grants@pitt.edu with any further questions.

Date Posted: Tue, 07 Mar 2017

Submissions

CFP: "After Socialism: Forgotten Legacies and Possible Futures in Africa and Beyond" -- October 13-14, 2017 (University of Beyreuth)

 

After Socialism: Forgotten Legacies and Possible Futures in Africa and Beyond
Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies - University of Bayreuth
October 13-14, 2017
After years of neglect, a burgeoning scholarship has recently emerged on African socialism, Second-Third World relations, anti-colonial radicalism, and state-directed modernization. This new research turn has productively revisited the history of socialism in the postcolonial world from various angles to reassess its historical dimensions and significance.
This workshop builds on this scholarship with the aim of pushing this broad investigation further. We seek to explore the intellectual transformations that have occurred since the end of “scientific”, “African” or “Arab” socialisms—political ideologies that were once confident, but have since faded. Though neither a universal red line nor a mono-causal explanation exists, this decline gained momentum during the 1980s through growing disillusionment with socialist experiments and the New International Economic Order, the promising luster of East Asian economic achievements, China’s gradual turn to capitalism, and, finally, the collapse of the Eastern bloc and the Soviet Union, which dealt the strongest blow. This demise of a socialist utopianism left a big void. And yet the socialist option has remained an approach and strategy at the grassroots level, as seen in popular movements in the United States, Europe, Africa, and Asia against growing discontent over forms of ultra-nationalism and global inequality.
In light of these past and present considerations, the workshop intends to address two sets of questions.
The first aims to study how political actors, social groups, intellectuals, and artists experienced these developments during the Cold War period, reacted to their demise, and, at times, reinvented themselves after the end of the Cold War. We are particularly interested in investigating conversions from socialism to new futures or alternative utopias, including the options of religion, human rights, liberal/social democracy, and more broadly within the field of culture. We seek to understand these new rationales as embedded in particular historical settings. What new ideas and futures that filled the void of socialism and how did they relate to it? And how did socialism – for some a political religion, for others a secular master narrative – pave the way for what came next? How were these shifts reflected in the academia, the media, literature, and arts? Furthermore, we seek to examine whether the demise of forward-looking, future-oriented political ideologies, like socialism, fostered a change in time regimes and temporal orders in a broader sense.
For instance, did linear notions of time lose currency? Or did they remain in force, but geared toward another “end of history”? Was the space of the future and its horizon of expectations diminished in favor of the present, or of the past? To what extent were these changes in time regimes transnational or a global phenomenon? Beyond these questions related to temporal orders, we are also interested in concurrent geographical orders (respatializations) triggered by these wide-ranging processes.
A second set of questions focuses on the afterlives of socialism. On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, this component of the workshop intends to reflect on the broader impact of the Revolution through Third World socialisms. Despite later disillusionment, Third World socialisms left an important and sometimes unexpected legacy. The democratic movement, Le balai citoyen, which brought down the corrupt government of Burkina Faso in 2014, drew inspiration from the socialist icon of Thomas Sankara. The Kurdish fight for democratic federalism in the Middle East and for the emancipation of women, which has historically drawn and still draws on Leninism, is another important example. Besides these political afterlives in social and national liberation movements, we encourage participating scholars to think of other connections and their complex legacies within present-day struggles for democracy and human rights, education and economic justice, as well as in the realm of popular culture, literature and arts. The question of socialist legacies and representation in current political, social, and cultural movements is a central topic, be it as fragmented symbols, such as the red beret in South Africa’s Economic Freedom Fighters party, or as direct reference to political icons such as Samora Machel and the usage of his speeches as mobile ring tone.
Following the path of our fellow historians and cultural scientists of Sudan (South Atlantic Quarterly 109, 2010), we wish to pursue the question: “What’s Left of the Left?”.
Practical information - Calendar
Abstracts (max. 500 words) and full papers (8,000-10,000 words including references) may be submitted both in English and in French to aftersocialism@yahoo.com. The workshop language will be English. The papers will be published in a special volume in the first half of 2018. Accommodation and travel costs will be covered (tickets may exceptionally be booked) by the Bayreuth Academy for Advanced African Studies.
Abstract submission deadline: April 30
Notification of acceptance: May 15
Full paper submission deadline: October 01
For further information please contact the conveners:
Nadine Siegert (Iwalewahaus, University of Bayreuth), Nadine.Siegert@uni-bayreuth.de
Christopher J. Lee (Lafayette College), leechris@lafayette.edu
Constantin Katsakioris (Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies), konstantinos.katsakioris@uni-bayreuth.de
Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

CFP: "Chronologics: Periodisation in a Global Context" -- Dec. 7-9, 2017 (Berlin)

The Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien and the Max Weber Stiftung invite submissions for a three-day conference in Berlin on concepts of historical periodization in transregional perspective. The conference is convened by Thomas Maissen (Deutsches Historisches Institut Paris, DHIP), Barbara Mittler (Heidelberger Centrum für Transkulturelle Studien, HCTS), and Pierre Monnet (Institut franco-allemand de sciences historiques et sociales, Frankfurt am Main). The conference will feature a keynote lecture on December 7th and several topical panel sessions on December 8th and 9th. It is arranged in cooperation with the Einstein Center Chronoi and the Graduate School Global Intellectual History at the Freie Universität Berlin and the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.
Submission Deadline: April 30, 2017
Epochal divisions and terminologies such as “antiquity”, “baroque,” the “classical age,” the “renaissance,” or “postmodernity,” the “long 19th!” or “short 20th” centuries are more than mere tools used pragmatically to arrange school curricula or museum collections. In most disciplines based on historical methods the use of these terminologies carries particular imaginations and meanings for the discursive construction of nations and communities. Many contemporary categories and periodisations have their roots in European teleologies, religious or historical traditions and thus are closely linked to particular power relations. As part of the colonial encounter they have been translated into new “temporal authenticities” in Africa, Asia and the Americas, as well as in Europe. German historians in particular, in C.H. Williams’ ironic description, “have an industry they call ‘Periodisierung’ and they take it very seriously. (…) Periodisation, this splitting up of time into neatly balanced divisions is, after all, a very arbitrary proceeding and should not be looked upon as permanent.” In producing and reproducing periodisations, historians structure possible narratives of temporality, they somehow “take up ownership of the past,” (Janet L. Nelson) imposing particular “regimes of historicity” (François Hartog). Accordingly, periodisations are never inert or innocent, indeed, they have been interpreted as a “theft of History” (Jack Goody).
The aim of this conference is to uncover some of the dynamics behind particular cultural and historical uses of periodisation schemes, as concepts for ordering the past, and thus to reconsider these terminologies “devised to think the world” (Sebastian Conrad). Periodisations are culturally determined. They beg for systematic comparison in order to identify the contextual specificity and contingency of particular understandings of particular historical epochs. An interdisciplinary and transregional perspective allows for a reconsideration of the (non-)transferability of historical periodisations and the possibility to work out categories of historical analysis that go beyond nation-bound interpretative patterns. The conference aims to show where and how periodisation reveals clear cultural, social, and national leanings and predispositions. We will discuss the making of these chronologics, the variable systems and morphologies it takes, e.g. religious, spatial and other models (e.g. linear, spiral, circular). We will focus on different agents and modes involved in the making of periodisation schemes (institutions ranging from the university to the school or the museum but also genres such as the documentary, the historical novel or local communities). We will discuss how European attempts at structuring the History, and along with them, particular chronotypes have been translated worldwide into universal and/or national, and communitarian models. At the same time, we will also focus on alternative, complementary and or silenced models of periodisation and epoch-making. By bringing together scholars with an expertise in different regions of the world, we hope to better understand the importance of temporality in the making of global history.
Application Procedure:
This call is open to emerging as well as established scholars on all levels. Abstracts should address themselves to some of the following issues and questions:
1. The Making of Periodisation Schemes
2. Morphologies and Models of Periodisation
3. Axial Times and Epochal Breaks
4. Time and Power: Periodisation in a Global Context
5. Popular and Pedagogical Dimensions of Periodisation
As the institutions involved have French, German and English as working languages, papers can be held in all of these three languages while the working language at the conference will be English. Abstracts should not exceed 300 words for paper presentations of 20-25 minutes. Please submit, along with a brief biographical statement, to initiatives@trafo-berlin.de by April 30, 2017. Selection of papers will take place in May, applicants will be informed by the end of May. The Forum Transregionale Studien will cover participants’ travel and accommodation expenses. Participants invited for presentation will have a version of their paper published online at “Trafo – Blog for Transregional Research” and may have the option to publish their papers in an edited print/open access format as well.
For questions regarding the organisation, please contact Alix Winter: initiatives@trafo-berlin.de; T: +49 (0)30 89 001-424; F: +49 (0)30 89 001-440.
Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

CFP: "The Modern State and Religious 'Dissent'" -- 25-26 September 2017 (Ekaterinburg, Russia)

Ural Federal University in collaboration with University of Haifa, University Roma Tre, University of Vienna
The Modern State and Religious “Dissent”

Place and time: Ekaterinburg, Russia, 25-26 September 2017
Venue: Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, Russia

During its long history, the modern state has domesticated both mainstream and marginal religious identities through a variety of approaches: for instance, policies of religious toleration (J. Locke), the ‘privatization of religious differences’ (B. Barry), and the ‘politics of recognition’ (A. E. Galeotti). Today, however, it is encountering new challenges.

Religious dissent has a long history on the Eurasian continent. The events of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, such as the Reformation, the subsequent religious wars in Europe, and the Old Believer schism in Russia, influenced the development of modern states. However, religious dissidents had an impact not only on the political sphere. They created their own idioms, literature, art, and philosophy, which expressed their self-understanding and views on the world, society, and other religions. The study of the radicalisation and de-radicalisation of religious movements can shed light on a variety of historical processes as well as the contemporary post-secular situation.

Political upheavals in the Middle East and the collapse of the Soviet Union and the communist paradigm opened the door for all sorts of “reinventions of tradition”. Religious affiliation became important for constructing new national identities, and religious voices came back to the public sphere. After the terrorist attacks of 9/11, novel interpretations of religion were suggested, such as the notion that the secular age is transforming into a post-secular one. In post-secular society, however, religions often appear in conservative and sometimes fundamentalist forms.

In recent decades, Europe has been facing the challenge of Islamic religious fundamentalism that emerged in Muslim communities inside and outside the EU. Terrorist attacks in Belgium, France, and Denmark were perpetrated by members of fundamentalist Islamic groups; the suicide terrorists claimed that they were religiously motivated and that their actions were targeting the very model of contemporary European society. Religion is politicised in the modernisation paradigm and reduced to yet another ideology to be exploited by radical groups in their struggle for economic and political dominance. Academic and media debates on religion’s significance do not give us an evidence-based understanding of the role religion can play in post-secular society.

This international forum will be convened to discuss the origins and contemporary predicaments of the religious sphere, its relation to the political sphere, and possible institutional arrangements capable of recognizing new developments in the post-secular age. Scholars from diverse fields such as history, sociology, philosophy, political theory and media are welcome to present their research on religion and religious dissent in its various forms.

Presentations on the following topics are welcome:

-relations between the state and religious minorities in the early modern, modern and contemporary periods;
-policies towards various confessions in multi-confessional societies: history and modernity;
-resistance of religious minorities to the state: history, language, art;
-radicalisation and de-radicalisation of religious movements;
-religious fanaticism: theory, history and current debates;
-politicisation of religion in the contemporary world: pro et contra;
-mainstream religions and religious dissent in the public sphere;
-interpretive and normative resources of contemporary political theory in making sense of religion in the post-secular world;
-reflection of religious dissent and fanaticism in mass media.

We look forward to receiving your abstracts (no longer than 250 words). Please include your full name, institutional affiliation, contact details (including email address), and academic status. The deadline for abstract submission is 30th April 2017. Please submit your abstract via email to urfu.conference2017@gmail.com.

Limited financial subsidies for travel expenses will be made available on the basis of a competition: please state in your email if you are interested in being considered.

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

CFP: "#Romania100: Looking Forward through the Past" -- The Conference of the Society for Romanian Studies (SRS), Bucharest, 26-30 June 2018

Call for Proposals for the Conference of the Society for Romanian Studies (SRS)
Bucharest, 26-30 June 2018
The SRS is an international inter-disciplinary academic organization that promotes professional study, criticism, and research on all aspects of Romanian culture and civilization, particularly concerning the countries of Romania and Moldova. For information about SRS, visit www.society4romanianstudies.org.
The 2018 SRS conference will be hosted by the Faculty of International Business and Economics of the Academy of Economic Studies (ASE) in Bucharest. We thank them for their support.   
#Romania100: Looking Forward through the Past
Keynote Addresses: Katherine Verdery and Vintilă Mihăilescu
In 1918, the National Assembly at Alba Iulia proclaimed the unity of all territories inhabited by Romanians and thereby laid the foundation for the modern Romanian state. Yet the proclamation also insisted on a wide range of principles and forward looking reforms from full rights for all (including ethnic and religious minorities, press, and right to assembly) to land reform and a democratic political system. This unique historical moment arguably represents in a nutshell the issues and dimensions associated with questions of a Romanian identity, a national consciousness and culture, the place of intellectuals in Romanian public life, as well as the politics, policies, and economics of Romanian development, including in comparative and international perspective. “Marea Unire” also served as midwife to the birth of Romanian Studies.
The SRS wishes to take the 100th anniversary of this unique moment in Romanian history as an invitation to reflect upon the past, reassess the moment’s impact on the present, and draw lessons for the future, including for Romanian Studies. The conference aims at taking a fresh look at the very creation of contemporary modern Romania. We wish to examine the significance of this historical moment for Romania and Moldova’s historical trajectories, domestically and within the wider European, Eurasian and even international contexts with the help of broad historical, political, literary, and cultural disciplinary and interdisciplinary inquiries.
We welcome proposals for papers, panels and roundtables from junior and senior scholars working in a variety of disciplines: history, sociology, anthropology and ethnography, political science, philosophy, law and justice studies, literature and linguistics, economics, business, international affairs, religious, gender and sexuality studies, film and media studies, art history, music, architecture, and education, among others. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:
- The 1918 unification in comparison with other unifications, both past and present
- The 1918 unification and its precursors in popular and official memory, historiography, film, literature, the arts
- The 1918 unification and its legacies on minorities and diasporas
- The 1918 unification and making connections to Romanian and Moldovan developments going forward (fascism/Nazism, communism, post-communism, democracy, human rights, minority rights)
- Romania, Moldova in Southeastern and Central Europe
- Romania, Moldova and European accession and integration
- Global integration, bilateral and multilateral relations, foreign and security policy issues
- World War I and the 1918 moment
- Romanian and Moldovan political thought, and the role of ideas in political change
- Romanian and Moldovan philosophy and literatures
- Sources and archives
- Writers, artists and the arts in fascism, communism and post-communism
- Legal and constitutional reforms
- Party and electoral politics, voting behavior, policy analysis and administration
- Free markets, neoliberalism and state paternalism
- The status of ethnic, religious, linguistic and sexual minorities in Romania and Moldova
- The reconfiguration of social stratification
- Post-communist media and journalism
- The role of the Orthodox Church and of other religious groups
- Dynamics of migration from and into Romania and Moldova
- Education policies and strategies
- Urban policies and architecture: 1918, communism, and post-communism
The language of the conference is English. Submissions and presentations in French and German will be considered, if they are for full panels or roundtables with members from more than one university.
Proposals for individual papers, panels, roundtables, book or movie presentations, and art installations should be sent by September 25, 2017 to srs2018conference@gmail.com. Participants will be notified of the acceptance of their proposal by December 4, 2017.
Individual paper proposals should include title, a brief abstract of up to 500 words, a short c.v., and contact information of the presenter. Proposals for panels including 3-4 papers, one chair, and 1-2 discussants should provide a title and description of the panel topic, abstracts of all papers, short c.v., and contact information for all participants. Panel participants should be drawn from at least two different universities. Roundtable proposals of 3-5 participants should include title and description of the topic, short c.v., and contact information for all participants. In addition, the conference organizers will accept proposals for presentations of books, movies and art installations; proposals should include a title, a description, short c.v., and contact information.
Conference registration fees: The fees are 65 USD for scholars from North America and Western Europe; 65 RON for scholars from Romania, Moldova and parts east; and 15 USD for graduate students from all countries. All these conference registration fees include SRS membership for 2018. All conference participants must pay the registration fee for their names to be included in the final program.
Date Posted: Tue, 07 Mar 2017

CFP: Critical Insights Volume on Leo Tolstoy

Critical Insights is a multi-volume series that offers original introductory criticism on key authors, works, and themes in literature that are addressed in core reading lists at the undergraduate level. The quality of scholarship and the level of analysis for this series are designed to provide the best and most well rounded overviews of the authors, works, and themes covered. Each volume is peer-edited by a scholar in the field. The result is a collection of authoritative, in-depth scholarship suitable for students and teachers alike. All chapters are written as original material and include an MLA-styled “Works Cited” section and bibliography. Published and distributed by Salem Press, new volumes in the series are solicited and edited by Grey House Publishing. The publisher owns the copyright of all submissions to its volumes.

The editor of a new Critical Insights volume on Leo Tolstoy seeks contributors to write chapters on any topic or text. Submissions on recent film and television adaptations of Tolstoy's work, Tolstoy's less commonly known works, Tolstoyan philosophy, and on narrative technique and authorial intent are especially of interest. Papers should be accessible to a general audience. 

Final drafts of chapters of approximately 4,000-5,000 words will be due on or around August 1, 2017.

Contributors will be compensated upon the submission of completed chapters.

To contribute, please send a proposed title and a short abstract (250 words or less) of the proposed chapter and with a short bio (150 words) by April 1, 2017 off-list to Rachel Stauffer at rachelstauffer@gmail.comPlease also feel free to send any questions.

Date Posted: Fri, 03 Mar 2017

CFP: The International Forum of Historians, Philosophers, and Publicists -- "1917-1922: Province in the Era of Systemic Crises" (December 6-7, 2017)

THE INTERNATIONAL FORUM OF HISTORIANS, PHILOSOPHERS, AND PUBLICISTS «1917–1922: Province in the Era of Systemic Crises» MARK THE CENTENARY OF THE GREAT RUSSIAN REVOLUTION Ulyanovsk, December 6-7, 2017

“Ironically, three men, whose lives were closely intertwined in the critical years of the Russian history: the last Tsar's Minister of the Interior Alexander Protopopov, hated by everyone; Vladimir Lenin, and I, were born in Simbirsk” Alexander Kerensky

THE FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS

Russian Historical Society and the Government of Ulyanovsk region, in cooperation with Russian Society of Political Scientists, hold the International Forum of Historians, Philosophers, and Publicists "1917-1922: Province in the Era of Systemic Crises" on December 6-7, 2017, in the city of Ulyanovsk, to mark the
centenary of the Great Russian Revolution.

The Forum is a cross-functional space to discuss critical and controversial issues related to the events of 1917-1922 in Russian province. We invite historians, philosophers, writers, publicists, political scientists, sociologists, and culture experts to participate in it. The Forum provides workshop sessions, discussion
areas, a series of exhibitions, meetings with leading experts in human sciences and journalists, publishers of academic and popular science reviews, workshops, public speeches in lecture halls and media, and a separate area for the participation of young scientists.

The main subject of the Forum – "1917-1922: Province in the Era of Systemic Crises".

In keeping with the main subject the following areas will be discussed:

1. "In the Name of the Revolution ...": The experience of regional law-making; Interaction and confrontation with the central authorities;

2. "Personal File of the Revolution": Prosopography of the Revolution; Revolution as a milestone; Mythology and hagiography of the Revolution;

3. National and regional elites during the Revolution: Between loyalty and secession;

4. Provincial routine. Behavioral strategies and regional practices.

Discussion area: “1917 and 1991: Russian Province in the Context of Systemic Crises of the 20th Century”

Round-table discussion: "The author, the publisher, the reader: the issues of interaction of academic and popular science reviews".

Please, send your proposal and abstract as an e-mail attachment in *.docx or *.doc format marked “Proposal Forum, area…” at forum1917-1922@mail.ru. Deadline for proposals is May 15, 2017. The proposal is made in the form of an e-mail attachment, named: number of the subject (Т) / round-table discussion (КС), discussion area (DС), exhibition (E) _ author’s (authors’) name (in Cyrillic characters). E.g.: T-Z_IvanovII; КС_IvanovII; DC_Iвановii. Proposals should include the following information: * Author’s full name; * Her / his place of employment, academic position, and affiliation(s); * Contact information (e-mail address and telephone number with a dialing code). * Title of proposed paper; * Name of the Forum session (workshop session, round-table discussion, discussion area), in which he/she plans to participate; * Abstract of no more than 200 words; * Equipment requirements (multimedia projector etc.)

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact Steering Committee: Karamzin Institute of Historical and Cultural Research of the Ulyanovsk Region– Cand. Sc. {History} Nadezhda Lipatova: +7 (8422) 21-44-07, forum1917-1922@mail.ru, nice.nii@mail.ru. Regional office of Russian Historical Society in Ulyanovsk – Head Elena Bespalova: +7 (8422) 32-47-84, forum1917-1922@mail.ru .

Progress update will be posted on a website of Karamzin IHCR UR: http://73history.ru and website of the Forum: http://forum1917-1922.csrae.ru/ru/1. For all the participants from other cities hotel accommodations will be booked.

Date Posted: Fri, 03 Mar 2017

Society for Romanian Studies (SRS) 2017 Graduate Student Essay Prize

Deadline: July 1, 2017
The Society for Romanian Studies is pleased to announce the Ninth Annual Graduate Student Essay Prize competition for an outstanding unpublished essay or thesis chapter. The essay must be written in English by a graduate student in any social science or humanities discipline on a Romanian or Moldovan subject, broadly and inclusively understood. The 2017 prize, consisting of $300, will be presented at the 2017 ASEEES Annual Convention in Chicago, November 9–12. The competition is open to current MA and doctoral students or to those who defended dissertations in the academic year 2016–2017. A dissertation chapter must include the dissertation abstract and table of contents; an expanded version of a conference paper must include a description of the panel and the conference paper proposal; and a seminar paper must include the seminar title and description. Submissions should be a maximum 12,500 words, including notes and bibliography. Candidates should also clearly indicate their institutional affiliation and the type of the essay submitted. Questions can be directed to the chair of the committee, Chris Davis <R.Chris.Davis@LoneStar.edu>.
Please send electronically a copy of the essay and an updated CV to each of the four members of the Prize Committee, listed below. Submissions must be sent by July 1, 2017.
Prof. R. Chris Davis (chair)
Department of History and Humanities
Lone Star College – Kingwood
Kingwood, TX, USA
R.Chris.Davis@LoneStar.edu
Members:
Prof. Diane Vancea, Ovidius University  <economics@ovidius-university.net>
Prof. Valentina Glajar, Texas State University  <vg10@txstate.edu>
Prof. Ronald King, San Diego State University  <rking@mail.sdsu.edu>
Date Posted: Thu, 02 Mar 2017

The Fourth Biennial Society for Romanian Studies (SRS) Book Prize

The Society for Romanian Studies invites nominations for the Fourth Biennial SRS Book Prize awarded for the best scholarly book published in English in the humanities or social sciences, on any subject relating to Romania or Moldova. To be eligible, books must be in English and published between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016 as indicated by the copyright date. Books may be in any academic field, with a predominant focus on Romanian or Moldovan subject matter (including subjects relating to the activities of non-Romanian ethnic groups on Romanian or Moldovan territory). Edited books, translations, reprints or new editions of works published before 2015, and non-scholarly books are not eligible.
The prize will be presented at the ASEEES National Convention in Chicago in November 2017 and carries with it an award of $500. Either authors or publishers of books may make submissions. Submissions should be sent to the SRS prize committee by 1 June 2017.
Three copies of each submitted book should be sent by mail directly to each committee member at the addresses given below. Questions or inquiries can be sent to the committee chair via email at A.J.Drace-Francis@uva.nl.
 
SRS Book Prize Committee Members: 
Alex Drace-Francis
European Studies Department
University of Amsterdam
Kloveniersburgwal 48
AMSTERDAM 1012CX
Netherlands
 
Peter Gross
10025 Casa Real Cove
Knoxville, TN 37922
USA
 
Inessa Medzhibovskaya
Eugene Lang College
The New School 65 West 11th Street New York, NY 10011 USA
 
For details about the SRS Book Prize and past winners please see: https://society4romanianstudies.org/2016/06/18/awards-prizes/
Date Posted: Thu, 02 Mar 2017

CFP: "Kinship, Genealogy, and Dynasty" - Ohio Medieval Colloquium (March 25, 2017)

CFP: Kinship, Genealogy, and Dynasty (Ohio Medieval Colloquium) -- March 25
The next meeting of the Ohio Medieval Colloquium will take place on Saturday March 25, 2017 from 10:30AM-4:30PM. Many thanks to our host, The Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies at The Ohio State University.  Dr. Christian Raffensperger from Wittenberg University will be joining us as the keynote speaker.
We welcome papers and works in progress related to this Spring’s theme, “Kinship, Genealogy, and Dynasty.” Please feel free to construe the theme broadly: we welcome your work in a diversity of disciplinary perspectives, time periods, and regions of the medieval world.
Please email paper proposals and equipment needs to one of the OMC co-chairs:
Gabrielle Parkin, Case Western Reserve University: glp24@case.edu
Bonnie Erwin, Wilmington College: bonnie_erwin@wilmington.edu
Date Posted: Tue, 21 Feb 2017

CFP: "Legacy of the Russian Revolution" -- November 16-18, 2017 (Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia, PA)

The History and Political Science Department at Chestnut Hill College will host an interdisciplinary conference on "The Legacy of the Russian Revolution," November 16-18, 2017. Keynote speakers will be Sheila Fitzpatrick (University of Sydney, Australia, and University of Chicago, emeritus) and Wendy Goldman (Carnegie Mellon University).  Proposals for papers or panels are invited on any issue related to "The Legacy of the Russian Revolution."  Papers may relate to the immediate or long-term ramifications of the Bolshevik seizure of power – political, diplomatic, military, social, economic, technological, intellectual, cultural, etc.
Proposals should be about 250-300 words and be accompanied by a CV.  Proposals from advanced graduate students will be considered. Papers will be allowed 20-25 minutes for presentation. We also seek individuals who are interested in serving as a Chair of a session. Presenters of papers and chairs of sessions are required to register for the conference.
In 2003 Chestnut Hill College inaugurated the "Legacy Conferences"; previous conferences have addressed the"Kennedy Legacy" (2003), "The Legacy of the Second World War" (2005), the "Legacy of 1968" (2008), "The Legacy of the Civil War" (2011), and the “Legacy of World War I" (2014).
Deadline for proposals is April 15, 2017. Send proposals to Holly Caldwell at russianrevolution@chc.edu or mail to Holly Caldwell at Chestnut Hill College, 9601 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19118.To be placed on a mailing list for conference registration, send your name, mailing address, and email address to russianrevolution@chc.edu. The conference website is being developed and will be available in the spring. 
Date Posted: Tue, 21 Feb 2017

Conferences & Workshops

CFP: UC BERKELEY REVOLUTIONARY CENTENARY WORKSHOP: "100 Years Later: The Russian Revolution and its Consequences"

UC BERKELEY REVOLUTIONARY CENTENARY WORKSHOP 

 
CALL FOR PAPERS
 
100 Years Later: The Russian Revolution and its Consequences
October 6-7, 2017
 
 
“The Soviet socialist revolution was the great utopian adventure of the modern age,” wrote the late Berkeley professor Martin Malia in the opening to his 1994 book The Soviet Tragedy. Utopian and pragmatic, top-down and bottom-up, tragic and fortunate: historians have affixed many adjectives to the year 1917 to describe it and its impact on Russia, the former Soviet Union, and the wider world. Long before the opening of the Russian archives in the early nineties, scholars have spilled much ink to debate the Revolution’s origins and causes, goals and shortcomings, beginning and end. Nearly all historians agree that the Revolution stands virtually unrivaled in its ambition, influence, and global legacy.
 
To mark the Revolution’s centenary, the University of California, Berkeley will host a workshop where graduate students in the dissertation writing phase can present and receive feedback on work that relates to the theme of the Russian Revolution and its consequences, broadly defined. How did the ideas, actors, and events that undergirded the Bolshevik program reverberate across the Soviet Union and beyond? In what ways did Soviet socialism serve as a model for non-Soviet governments, revolutionaries, reformers, and other elites to follow, reject, or improve upon? What effect did the collapse have on socialist and non-socialist governments, and what role does memory of the Soviet past play in the former USSR and beyond today? We welcome chronological diversity (from 1917 to the present), regional variation (Russia and the Soviet republics, Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, North America and Asia), and thematic range (political, social, economic, environmental, scientific, intellectual, etc.). Our goal is to bring together young scholars from universities across the United States whose work is adding to and changing the way we think, research, and write about the world that 1917 forged. 
 
Thanks to generous funding from the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES) at the University of California, Berkeley, this small, intensive workshop will assemble eight participants and at least three senior scholars with relevant expertise to comment on individual papers. This workshop will convene at the University of California, Berkeley, October 6-7, 2017.
 
Those interested in applying should submit a brief CV as well as a paper title and 500-word abstract by May 15, 2017. We welcome paper proposals from ABDs across the United States working directly or indirectly on topics related to the Soviet Union. Invitations to the workshop will be issued in summer 2017. Papers (dissertation chapters or articles up to 40 pages in length) will be distributed to all participants one month before the event. As this workshop will be interactive, we ask that all participants commit to reading the sent papers and arrive at Berkeley ready for discussion.  Stipends for travel and lodging expenses may become available, although the workshop organizers encourage participants to apply for funding from their home universities to defray travel costs. Coffee, lunch, and dinner will be covered for the duration of the workshop. Questions can be sent to Yana Skorobogatov at the address: berkeley1917@gmail.com. Proposals should be submitted at the following link: https://goo.gl/forms/oeIozsR4ZNZvCKj43.
Date Posted: Tue, 28 Mar 2017

CFP: The Modern State and Religious “Dissent”

Ural Federal University in collaboration with

University of Haifa, University Roma Tre, University of Vienna

The Modern State and Religious “Dissent”

Place and time: Ekaterinburg, Russia, 25-26 September 2017
Venue: Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, Russia

During its long history, the modern state has domesticated both mainstream and marginal religious identities through a variety of approaches: for instance, policies of religious toleration (J. Locke), the ‘privatization of religious differences’ (B. Barry), and the ‘politics of recognition’ (A. E. Galeotti). Today, however, it is encountering new challenges.

Religious dissent has a long history on the Eurasian continent. The events of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, such as the Reformation, the subsequent religious wars in Europe, and the Old Believer schism in Russia, influenced the development of modern states. However, religious dissidents had an impact not only on the political sphere. They created their own idioms, literature, art, and philosophy, which expressed their self-understanding and views on the world, society, and other religions. The study of the radicalisation and de-radicalisation of religious movements can shed light on a variety of historical processes as well as the contemporary post-secular situation.

Political upheavals in the Middle East and the collapse of the Soviet Union and the communist paradigm opened the door for all sorts of “reinventions of tradition”. Religious affiliation became important for constructing new national identities, and religious voices came back to the public sphere. After the terrorist attacks of 9/11, novel interpretations of religion were suggested, such as the notion that the secular age is transforming into a post-secular one. In post-secular society, however, religions often appear in conservative and sometimes fundamentalist forms.

In recent decades, Europe has been facing the challenge of Islamic religious fundamentalism that emerged in Muslim communities inside and outside the EU. Terrorist attacks in Belgium, France, and Denmark were perpetrated by members of fundamentalist Islamic groups; the suicide terrorists claimed that they were religiously motivated and that their actions were targeting the very model of contemporary European society. Religion is politicised in the modernisation paradigm and reduced to yet another ideology to be exploited by radical groups in their struggle for economic and political dominance. Academic and media debates on religion’s significance do not give us an evidence-based understanding of the role religion can play in post-secular society.

This international forum will be convened to discuss the origins and contemporary predicaments of the religious sphere, its relation to the political sphere, and possible institutional arrangements capable of recognizing new developments in the post-secular age. Scholars from diverse fields such as history, sociology, philosophy, political theory and media are welcome to present their research on religion and religious dissent in its various forms.

Presentations on the following topics are welcome:

-relations between the state and religious minorities in the early modern, modern and contemporary periods;
-policies towards various confessions in multi-confessional societies: history and modernity;
-resistance of religious minorities to the state: history, language, art;
-radicalisation and de-radicalisation of religious movements;
-religious fanaticism: theory, history and current debates;
-politicisation of religion in the contemporary world: pro et contra;
-mainstream religions and religious dissent in the public sphere;
-interpretive and normative resources of contemporary political theory in making sense of religion in the post-secular world;
-reflection of religious dissent and fanaticism in mass media.

We look forward to receiving your abstracts (no longer than 250 words). Please include your full name, institutional affiliation, contact details (including email address), and academic status. The deadline for abstract submission is 30th April 2017. Please submit your abstract via email to

urfu.conference2017@gmail.com

Limited financial subsidies for travel expenses will be made available on the basis of a competition: please state in your email if you are interested in being considered.

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

MWWHA Conference on "Reformations and Revolutions in World History"

Call for Proposals
 
“Reformations and Revolutions in World History”
The Eighth Annual Conference of the 
Midwest World History Association
 
22-23 September 2017, University of Central Oklahoma (Edmond, Oklahoma)
The proposal deadline has been extended to 15 April 2017
and the keynote is announced.
 
The Midwest World History Association is happy to announce a call for paper, poster, panel, roundtable, and workshop proposals for its annual conference to be held at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond, Oklahoma, on September 22nd and 23rd, 2017. The conference theme is ‘Reformations and Revolutions in World History.’
 
Today the world finds itself at a crossroads, just as it has done so many times before and will undoubtedly do so in the future.  The crises faced today – a resurgence in Nationalism, extremism, the continuance of war and its results: refugees, poverty, and hunger – seem to be testing the anchors of contemporary values of peace, tolerance, and humanity.
 
Far from the first crisis the world has faced, it is nevertheless important to grasp its history and the history of the ideas that have shaped it to understand the events of today. This year, 2017, will see the commemoration of the Protestant Reformation (1517), the Russian Revolution (1917), the independence of India and Pakistan (1947), the first sub-Saharan African Independence in Ghana (1957), and the signature of the Treaty of Rome (1957). Other anniversaries marked in 2017 include, but are not limited to, the Tacfarinas uprising against the Romans in 17 CE, the first official European diplomatic mission to China (1517), US entry into the First World War (1917), the internationalization of the Spanish Civil War (1937), the Palestine Partition Resolution (1947), the 1947 Truman Doctrine, and the 1967 Arab-Israeli War.                                                                             
This conference will bring together emerging scholars, early career researchers, established academics from a variety of disciplines, and 6th-12th-grade teachers to provide a platform to explore the implications and significance the Reformation and revolutions have in the world. We encourage contributions from a range of perspectives, including social, political, intellectual and cultural history; social and cultural geography; social and political science; and 9-12 lesson plans. Possible subjects may include, but are not limited to:
  • How has the dynamics of ‘reformation' and ‘revolution' worked with and against one another in world history?
  • What impact have reform and/or revolutionary change had in the world?
  • What effects have revolutionary and/or reformist approaches to crisis had in the past?
  •  How are landmark moments such as the Reformation, and the numerous revolutions in world history, remembered/represented?
  •  To what extent/in what ways are contemporary events the legacy of previous crises, or of attempts to reform/transform the world?
  • How have specific political ideas (liberalism, capitalism, communism, socialism, freedom, justice, governmentality, legitimacy—as well as [post]colonialism and feminism) shaped historical development, particularly in moments of crisis
  • How has world history given rise to new or revolutionary political ideas?
Proposals on any aspect of World History scholarship and teaching are also welcome.
 
The keynote speaker will be Dr. Amy Nelson Burnett, Paula and D.B. Varner University Professor of History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Professor Burnett’s work has focused on the Protestant Reformation in Germany and Switzerland, with emphasis on the exchange of ideas through printing and debate. Among her many books, Teaching the Reformation: Ministers and their Message in Basel, 1529-1629 (Oxford University Press, 2008) won the Gerald Strauss Prize awarded by the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference. Dr. Burnett will deliver a keynote entitled, “Reform, Dissent, and Toleration: The Reformation as a Crisis of Authority.”
 
Please send an abstract of 250 words, together with a short curriculum vitae, to the Program Committee Chair, Dr. Nikki Magie at chair@mwwha.org no later than 15 April 2017 (extended deadline). Questions about the conference can also be directed to this address. Where a complete panel is proposed, the convener should also include a 250-word abstract of the panel theme. Each panelist should plan to spend no more than 20 minutes presenting her or his paper.
 
Presenters must register for the conference by 15 August 2017 to be included in the program.
 
The MWWHA will offer up to three competitive Graduate Student Awards to offset part of the conference costs. Graduate students interested in applying should include a letter with their conference proposal explaining how the conference helps them with their studies, teaching, and/or future career plans as well as how their paper fits with the conference theme and the mission of the MWWHA.
 
We also invite accepted papers to be submitted to our journal, The Middle Ground, for potential publication: http://themiddlegroundjournal.org/.
 
Further information about the MWWHA, including membership and conference registration (when it becomes available), can be found on our website: http://mwwha.org/.
 
Presenters will be notified of acceptance by 15 May 2017.
Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

CFP: "After Socialism: Forgotten Legacies and Possible Futures in Africa and Beyond" -- October 13-14, 2017 (University of Beyreuth)

 

After Socialism: Forgotten Legacies and Possible Futures in Africa and Beyond
Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies - University of Bayreuth
October 13-14, 2017
After years of neglect, a burgeoning scholarship has recently emerged on African socialism, Second-Third World relations, anti-colonial radicalism, and state-directed modernization. This new research turn has productively revisited the history of socialism in the postcolonial world from various angles to reassess its historical dimensions and significance.
This workshop builds on this scholarship with the aim of pushing this broad investigation further. We seek to explore the intellectual transformations that have occurred since the end of “scientific”, “African” or “Arab” socialisms—political ideologies that were once confident, but have since faded. Though neither a universal red line nor a mono-causal explanation exists, this decline gained momentum during the 1980s through growing disillusionment with socialist experiments and the New International Economic Order, the promising luster of East Asian economic achievements, China’s gradual turn to capitalism, and, finally, the collapse of the Eastern bloc and the Soviet Union, which dealt the strongest blow. This demise of a socialist utopianism left a big void. And yet the socialist option has remained an approach and strategy at the grassroots level, as seen in popular movements in the United States, Europe, Africa, and Asia against growing discontent over forms of ultra-nationalism and global inequality.
In light of these past and present considerations, the workshop intends to address two sets of questions.
The first aims to study how political actors, social groups, intellectuals, and artists experienced these developments during the Cold War period, reacted to their demise, and, at times, reinvented themselves after the end of the Cold War. We are particularly interested in investigating conversions from socialism to new futures or alternative utopias, including the options of religion, human rights, liberal/social democracy, and more broadly within the field of culture. We seek to understand these new rationales as embedded in particular historical settings. What new ideas and futures that filled the void of socialism and how did they relate to it? And how did socialism – for some a political religion, for others a secular master narrative – pave the way for what came next? How were these shifts reflected in the academia, the media, literature, and arts? Furthermore, we seek to examine whether the demise of forward-looking, future-oriented political ideologies, like socialism, fostered a change in time regimes and temporal orders in a broader sense.
For instance, did linear notions of time lose currency? Or did they remain in force, but geared toward another “end of history”? Was the space of the future and its horizon of expectations diminished in favor of the present, or of the past? To what extent were these changes in time regimes transnational or a global phenomenon? Beyond these questions related to temporal orders, we are also interested in concurrent geographical orders (respatializations) triggered by these wide-ranging processes.
A second set of questions focuses on the afterlives of socialism. On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, this component of the workshop intends to reflect on the broader impact of the Revolution through Third World socialisms. Despite later disillusionment, Third World socialisms left an important and sometimes unexpected legacy. The democratic movement, Le balai citoyen, which brought down the corrupt government of Burkina Faso in 2014, drew inspiration from the socialist icon of Thomas Sankara. The Kurdish fight for democratic federalism in the Middle East and for the emancipation of women, which has historically drawn and still draws on Leninism, is another important example. Besides these political afterlives in social and national liberation movements, we encourage participating scholars to think of other connections and their complex legacies within present-day struggles for democracy and human rights, education and economic justice, as well as in the realm of popular culture, literature and arts. The question of socialist legacies and representation in current political, social, and cultural movements is a central topic, be it as fragmented symbols, such as the red beret in South Africa’s Economic Freedom Fighters party, or as direct reference to political icons such as Samora Machel and the usage of his speeches as mobile ring tone.
Following the path of our fellow historians and cultural scientists of Sudan (South Atlantic Quarterly 109, 2010), we wish to pursue the question: “What’s Left of the Left?”.
Practical information - Calendar
Abstracts (max. 500 words) and full papers (8,000-10,000 words including references) may be submitted both in English and in French to aftersocialism@yahoo.com. The workshop language will be English. The papers will be published in a special volume in the first half of 2018. Accommodation and travel costs will be covered (tickets may exceptionally be booked) by the Bayreuth Academy for Advanced African Studies.
Abstract submission deadline: April 30
Notification of acceptance: May 15
Full paper submission deadline: October 01
For further information please contact the conveners:
Nadine Siegert (Iwalewahaus, University of Bayreuth), Nadine.Siegert@uni-bayreuth.de
Christopher J. Lee (Lafayette College), leechris@lafayette.edu
Constantin Katsakioris (Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies), konstantinos.katsakioris@uni-bayreuth.de
Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

CFP: "Chronologics: Periodisation in a Global Context" -- Dec. 7-9, 2017 (Berlin)

The Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien and the Max Weber Stiftung invite submissions for a three-day conference in Berlin on concepts of historical periodization in transregional perspective. The conference is convened by Thomas Maissen (Deutsches Historisches Institut Paris, DHIP), Barbara Mittler (Heidelberger Centrum für Transkulturelle Studien, HCTS), and Pierre Monnet (Institut franco-allemand de sciences historiques et sociales, Frankfurt am Main). The conference will feature a keynote lecture on December 7th and several topical panel sessions on December 8th and 9th. It is arranged in cooperation with the Einstein Center Chronoi and the Graduate School Global Intellectual History at the Freie Universität Berlin and the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.
Submission Deadline: April 30, 2017
Epochal divisions and terminologies such as “antiquity”, “baroque,” the “classical age,” the “renaissance,” or “postmodernity,” the “long 19th!” or “short 20th” centuries are more than mere tools used pragmatically to arrange school curricula or museum collections. In most disciplines based on historical methods the use of these terminologies carries particular imaginations and meanings for the discursive construction of nations and communities. Many contemporary categories and periodisations have their roots in European teleologies, religious or historical traditions and thus are closely linked to particular power relations. As part of the colonial encounter they have been translated into new “temporal authenticities” in Africa, Asia and the Americas, as well as in Europe. German historians in particular, in C.H. Williams’ ironic description, “have an industry they call ‘Periodisierung’ and they take it very seriously. (…) Periodisation, this splitting up of time into neatly balanced divisions is, after all, a very arbitrary proceeding and should not be looked upon as permanent.” In producing and reproducing periodisations, historians structure possible narratives of temporality, they somehow “take up ownership of the past,” (Janet L. Nelson) imposing particular “regimes of historicity” (François Hartog). Accordingly, periodisations are never inert or innocent, indeed, they have been interpreted as a “theft of History” (Jack Goody).
The aim of this conference is to uncover some of the dynamics behind particular cultural and historical uses of periodisation schemes, as concepts for ordering the past, and thus to reconsider these terminologies “devised to think the world” (Sebastian Conrad). Periodisations are culturally determined. They beg for systematic comparison in order to identify the contextual specificity and contingency of particular understandings of particular historical epochs. An interdisciplinary and transregional perspective allows for a reconsideration of the (non-)transferability of historical periodisations and the possibility to work out categories of historical analysis that go beyond nation-bound interpretative patterns. The conference aims to show where and how periodisation reveals clear cultural, social, and national leanings and predispositions. We will discuss the making of these chronologics, the variable systems and morphologies it takes, e.g. religious, spatial and other models (e.g. linear, spiral, circular). We will focus on different agents and modes involved in the making of periodisation schemes (institutions ranging from the university to the school or the museum but also genres such as the documentary, the historical novel or local communities). We will discuss how European attempts at structuring the History, and along with them, particular chronotypes have been translated worldwide into universal and/or national, and communitarian models. At the same time, we will also focus on alternative, complementary and or silenced models of periodisation and epoch-making. By bringing together scholars with an expertise in different regions of the world, we hope to better understand the importance of temporality in the making of global history.
Application Procedure:
This call is open to emerging as well as established scholars on all levels. Abstracts should address themselves to some of the following issues and questions:
1. The Making of Periodisation Schemes
2. Morphologies and Models of Periodisation
3. Axial Times and Epochal Breaks
4. Time and Power: Periodisation in a Global Context
5. Popular and Pedagogical Dimensions of Periodisation
As the institutions involved have French, German and English as working languages, papers can be held in all of these three languages while the working language at the conference will be English. Abstracts should not exceed 300 words for paper presentations of 20-25 minutes. Please submit, along with a brief biographical statement, to initiatives@trafo-berlin.de by April 30, 2017. Selection of papers will take place in May, applicants will be informed by the end of May. The Forum Transregionale Studien will cover participants’ travel and accommodation expenses. Participants invited for presentation will have a version of their paper published online at “Trafo – Blog for Transregional Research” and may have the option to publish their papers in an edited print/open access format as well.
For questions regarding the organisation, please contact Alix Winter: initiatives@trafo-berlin.de; T: +49 (0)30 89 001-424; F: +49 (0)30 89 001-440.
Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS: A Century of Movement: Russian Culture and Global Community Since 1917

A Century of Movement: 
Russian Culture and Global Community Since 1917
CFP Deadline: April 7, 2017
October 12-13, 2017
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Keynote Speakers: Katerina Clark and Marina Frolova-Walker
Conference Organizers: Jamie Blake and Grace Kweon, in collaboration with Annegret Fauser
 
The cultural products of the last century reflect change, opportunity, and uncertainty, and demonstrate active negotiations between personal identity and social awareness, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, artistic voice and security. This conference, in the centennial year of the Revolution, seeks to explore the transformations set in motion during and after the events of 1917 through an examination of cultural production and practices, located both within and without Russia.
 
We will explore first and foremost the issue of human migration, particularly the patterns and developments set in motion by the Revolution. In light of today’s desperate discussions regarding the migration of refugees, it is both timely and important that we examine the ways in which human migration yielded and continues to yield both social and cultural challenges and profound creative contributions.  
 
We invite proposals of no more than 300 words for individual twenty-minute papers. Scholars and graduate students of all areas are encouraged to apply, as we hope to assemble a conference which promotes interdisciplinary discussion, with an eye towards the possibility of future publication in a volume of collected essays or a special issue of a journal.
 
Please visit the conference website for more information: http://centuryofmovement.unc.edu
                                                                                                    
Proposals should include presenter name, contact information, institutional affiliation (if any) and a short biographical note (not to exceed 100 words).  Please send proposals to centuryofmovement-at-gmail.com. The deadline for submission is April 7, 2017.
Date Posted: Thu, 09 Mar 2017

Summer/ language Opportunities

Hunter College Study Abroad in Russian Literature and Language in the Baltics

The Division of Russian and Slavic Studies at Hunter College (CUNY) is offering a new two-track study abroad program in Russian language and literature in the Baltics (June 4 - July 31, 2017)! The application deadline is April 6.

The program will be based in Riga, but includes a 4-day trip to Lithuania (Kaunas, Vilnius, Klaipeda, Palanga) and a 2-day trip to Estonia (Tartu and Tallinn).

The language track is an intensive Intermediate Russian course, with a prerequisite of 2 semesters of Russian taken previously.

The literature track is a course taught in English, but with the option of doing most readings in Russian, titled "THE BALTIC TRANSIT: RUSSIAN WRITERS EN ROUTE TO THE WEST." It explores the roles of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in Russian literature and culture throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, beginning with the period of the three states' interwar independence, covering the years of WWII and the Soviet period, as well as addressing the post-Soviet times and the present-day cultural and political moment. 

Please don't hesitate to email Prof. Yasha Klots (yakov.klots@hunter.cuny.edu) with questions - he will be happy to provide detailed information on all aspects of the program, including the syllabi, the schedule, etc.

Here is the link to the Hunter College Study Abroad office webpage with the program description:

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/educationabroad/programs/short-term-programs/summer-2017-programs/latvia

Date Posted: Fri, 24 Mar 2017

Deadline to apply to SSRES (Russian and Kazakh in Astana, Kazakhstan) is Extended to March 31, 2017

The deadline to apply to SSRES at Nazarbayev University has been extended to March 31. Please, let your students know and pass this announcement to anyone who might be interested in this opportunity!

Nazarbayev University (Astana, Kazakhstan), in collaboration with the University of Arizona, is pleased to announce the Second Summer School in Russian and Eurasian Studies (SSRES). We are now accepting applications from undergraduate and graduate students, as well as working professionals for our 2017 summer session. The deadline for applications is March 31, 2017.Program dates for SSRES 2017: May 26-July 22 (8 weeks)

The main component of SSRES in 2017 will be an Intensive 8-week Course in Russian Language (all levels are welcome) OR an Intensive 8-week Course in Beginner’s Kazakh Language. The program offers 120 contact hours of in-class instruction in all aspects of these languages and one elective course in the Eurasian Studies curriculum taught in English. Students can choose one from the following elective courses:

  • HST 100 History of Kazakhstan (6 ECTS or 3 Carnegie)
  • HST 104 Central Asian History II (6 ECTS or 3 Carnegie)
  • WLL 230 Survey of Post-Soviet Russian Literature and Culture (6 ECTS or 3 Carnegie)

In additional to the core program, the students will have an opportunity to learn some elementary Kazakh and get an introduction to Kazakh culture by taking a weekly non-credited practical course in Kazakh Language and Culture (once a week on Fridays, free and included in the program). Students, enrolled in Kazakh, will be able to take a similar course in Russian Language and Culture.

American students have an option to apply to the program through The University of Arizona Global Initiatives and earn US-based academic credits. The University of Arizona offers full health insurance coverage, pre-departure orientation and advising sessions, and 24/7 counselling services to all program participants.  For more information, visit the program’s website at https://global.arizona.edu/study-abroad/program/arizona-kazakhstan.

For more information about the program, including its cost, course descriptions, and the cultural program, visit our website: https://shss.nu.edu.kz/academics/summer-school-russian-eurasian-studies and the program blog at http://ssres-nazarbayev-university.com/. Please address all questions to Professor Victoria Thorstensson (victoria.thorstensson@nu.edu.kz). 

Questions about the application process through the University of Arizona should be addressed to Professor Liudmila Klimanova, Director for the Arizona in Kazakhstan Program (klimanova@mail.arizona.edu).

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

STARTALK Summer Institute “Proficiency-based Pedagogy for Russian”

Middlebury School of Russian is pleased to announce the 2017 STARTALK Summer Institute Proficiency-based Pedagogy for Russian intended for novice teachers of Russian and graduate students with no or limited teaching experiences.
 
The Institute provides participants with unique opportunities to gain a solid foundation in second language acquisition theory and language proficiency framework, and to transfer this knowledge into classroom practice. Participants will create teaching materials for different levels of instruction, implementing STARTALK-endorsed best teaching practices, and engage in practice-teaching in a safe environment with guidance from experienced language practitioners.
 
The Institute consists of two parts: a 5-day online session (June 19-23, 2017) and a 12-day on-campus session in Middlebury, VT (July 12-23, 2017); both sessions are mandatory. During the on-line session participants will engage in learning and discussing theoretical approaches to language acquisition and principles of proficiency-based pedagogy, so that the on-campus session can be dedicated to applying this theoretical knowledge to classroom teaching and material development. During the on-campus session, participants will brainstorm, design, and implement curricular units, lessons and activities.
Institute’s participants will experience the unique immersive environment of the Middlebury Russian School. By living in the language, participants themselves will see how a learning community of people who speak Russian with varying levels of fluency can be built and sustained.
 
Tuition, lodging expenses, meals, textbooks, and classroom materials are covered by the STARTALK grant, and each participant is eligible to receive a travel reimbursement for up to $300. Participants will receive one course unit of graduate credit.
 
NEW FOR 2017: This year the STARTALK Institute has received an award to offer up to 5 scholarships to cover tuition for the 1-Week Refresher Course (July 2-9). These scholarships are competitive and will be awarded to those admitted STARTALK participants who need to 􏰀update􏰁 their language skills before starting the on-campus program on July 12. More information about the Refresher Course is available here.
 
Please note that the application deadline is March 31, 2017. Finalists will be notified by April 1, 2017.
 
For information and to submit an application, please, visit http://www.middlebury.edu/ls/russian/startalkrussian. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact program director, Irina Dubinina, at idubinin@brandeis.edu or lead instructor, Olesya Kisselev, at ovk103@psu.edu
Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

STARTALK: Transitioning to Teaching Language Online (TTLO)

June 12-July 2, 2017 (3-week, online course)

This STARTALK program is designed for K-16 teachers of Arabic, Chinese, Dari, Hindi, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Swahili, Turkish, or Urdu who want to teach their language online.

Offered completely online, this 3-week, intensive course will give teacher participants the experience of being an online learner. Course content will focus on many different facets of a successful online language course, such as creating community, time management strategies for teachers and students, choosing appropriate technology tools for communicative-based activities, and developing a variety of online activity types. In addition to exploring these aspects of teaching online, participants will see these concepts in action in model online language activities. By the end of the course, participants will have a portfolio of activities ready to be incorporated in an online course.

Instructional Staff: Xiaowei Hunt (Course Facilitator), Ritu Jayakar (Course Facilitator), Shannon Spasova (Course Facilitator), Alyssa Bonnac (Lead Instructor), Frances Matos-Schultz (Lead Instructor), & Marlene Johnshoy (Program Director).

Applications are due May 15, 2017.

For more information see: http://carla.umn.edu/technology/STARTALK/

Date Posted: Thu, 23 Mar 2017

University of Pittsburgh 2017 Summer Language Institute -- Funding Available

The University of Pittsburgh’s 2017 Summer Language Institute has exceptional scholarship funding for the following intensive language courses:
 
Beg., Intermed., & Advanced BCS                  6 credits                June 5 – July 14, 2017
Beginning Czech                                                    6 credits                June 5 – July 14, 2017
Beginning Turkish                                               8 credits                June 5- July 28, 2017
Beginning Arabic (MSA with Levantine)       8 credits                June 5 – July 28, 2017
Ukrainian                                                              6 credits                June 5 – July 14, 2017
Advanced & 4th-year Russian                           8 credits                June 5 – July 28, 2017
 
Scholarships for qualified applicants typically cover 70-90% of tuition costs.  For more information and applications, see sli.pitt.edu.  Applications are accepted through May, 2017.

 

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Mar 2017

STARTALK Russian Language & Culture Immersion Program -- California State University, Northridge

California State University, Northridge is offering an exceptional opportunity to college students to develop foreign language skills in Russian. This language program is unique because it offers a STARTALK curriculum that promotes and strengthens participating students’ knowledge base and understanding of Russian language and culture and connects the language development of each student with the content in his or her academic discipline via authentic written material and oral interaction in the target language. The program strengthens students’ speaking ability, advances their reading and writing skills, monitors their learning progress, and integrates the Russian language with their knowledge of current affairs. The Russian Language & Culture Immersion Program is designed to meet the needs of motivated, career-minded students who want to expand their international professional options in an increasingly global workplace and prepares students for potential job opportunities that make use of their Russian language skills. The program also works with the California State University, Northridge career center, which sends out a representative who provides information to students about how to highlight Russian language skills on a resume or CV, the most effective way to relate Russian proficiency to jobs and careers, and the resources available in the career center. Students who take advantage of this program will gain cross-cultural experience that will give them a competitive edge in today’s growing international business community.

The Russian Language & Culture Immersion Program faculty consists of enthusiastic native-speakers, with strong pedagogical skills and experience in immersion program work. Students can expect a serious academic atmosphere that will enhance their skills in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. The Russian Language &amp; Culture Immersion Program also offers students a variety of extracurricular activities that promote cultural awareness as well as language learning opportunities. They include Russian guest speakers, field trips to the Russian enclaves in the greater Los Angeles area, and other cultural events.

Due to the program’s ongoing success, it has been expanded to include college students from around the country. Russian Language & Culture Immersion Program is accepting applications from students at all levels (beginning, intermediate, and advanced Russian). Upon completion of the program, students may be eligible to receive 6 credit units.

The National Security Agency and National Foreign Language Center have once again provided a grant to the Startalk Russian Language and Culture Immersion Program at CSUN for 2017. Those who are accepted to the 2017 immersion program are eligible for scholarships that will cover instruction, textbooks, dormitory stay, field trips, and all extracurricular activities.

The program is a 6-week immersion residential program at CSUN during the 2017 summer session, which will begin on June 15, 2017 and end on July 21, 2017. The deadline to apply is March 31, 2017.

For more information and to access the application, please visit http://www.csun.edu/humanities/startalk.

 
Date Posted: Fri, 10 Mar 2017

Summer University Prague 2017: "Understanding Europe in an Age of Uncertainty" (Sept. 9-23)

Summer University Prague 2017: "Understanding Europe in an Age of Uncertainty"
September 9th – September 23rd, 2017


OBJECTIVES:
-to provide students with a broad understanding of the most significant recent political and social issues in Europe
-to analyse the current challenges and risks for the future of European development

METHODS:

-interdisciplinary

-multiple forms of learning (lectures, workshops, discussions, group work and student presentations)

BENEFITS:
-numerous social and cultural activities
-truly international group of participants

Internationally recognized study programme. Successful participants awarded 10 ECTS credits.

Price: 990 EUR
Includes: tuition, social and cultural events, on-line reading materials, accommodation in the dormitory, breakfasts and lunches


Programme, applications and further details:
http://summer-university.fsv.cuni.cz
Address: Summer University 2017
Charles University
Faculty of Social Sciences
Smetanovo nabrezi 6
CZ–110 00 Praha 1
Czech Republic
Tel: (+420) 251 080 250
Fax: (+420) 251 620 294
E-mail: summer.university@fsv.cuni.cz
Facebook: Spring and Summer
Universities Prague
Organized by: Charles University, Faculty of Social Sciences
Place: Prague, Czech Republic

Date Posted: Tue, 07 Mar 2017

UW-Madison Arabic, Persian, and Turkish Language Immersion Institute (APTLII)

Applications for 2017 are now open!

Move-in: Saturday, June 17
Orientation: Sunday, June 18
Classes begin Monday, June 19.

The UW-Madison Arabic, Persian, and Turkish Language Immersion Institute (APTLII) is a residential summer language immersion program for undergraduates, graduate students, and professionals. Courses are offered for academic credit at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels (depending on sufficient enrollment). Students commit to using their target language as their only means of communication for the entire summer - in class, in their shared living space on campus, at meals, and at co-curricular activities that combine to create a language immersion experience.

Each 8-week language class is equivalent to two semesters of study, with full academic year credit. Instruction is given in small groups taught by native speakers and experienced language teachers. The classes are intensive, involving a minimum of 4.5 hours contact hours Mondays through Fridays, plus extra hours for homework.

In addition to formal classes, on most afternoons and evenings students participate in co-curricular activities covering a range of topics relating to the history and culture of the region. This combination of formal classes, cultural and language activities, movies, field trips, and language tables provide students with opportunities to expand their vocabulary and practice using the language in different settings.

For more information, see http://aptlii.global.wisc.edu.

Date Posted: Tue, 07 Mar 2017

Fall 2017 Semester Abroad Programs: Intensive Russian and Subject Matter Courses (Daugavpils University, Latvia)

Daugavpils University and the “Learn Russian in the European Union” project invite students for customized Semester Abroad programs hosted by Daugavpils University, Latvia.

All Semester Abroad programs include:

(1) Intensive "Russian as a Foreign Language" core course (interactive communication skills, grammar, phonetics), provided at Intermediate, Advanced, and Superior target proficiency levels.

(2) Subject matter group and elective courses, depending on the selected program and delivered in English and/or Russian:
     - Russian language, literature, and culture;
     - East European studies;
     - Natural Sciences (mathematics, physics, biology, chemistry, environmental studies), theory and laboratory practice;
     - Political Science.

Daugavpils University will award up to 30 ECTS credits (Russian – 15 ECTS, subject matter courses – up to 15 ECTS.
No visa is required to study in Latvia for citizens of the USA, Canada, the European Union, and many other countries.

Program features:
     - Accommodation with a Russian-speaking host family.
     - Native Russian student communication partners.
     - Full language and cultural immersion in the European Union's most Russian city.
     - Excursions, field trips, cultural and sports activities.
     - Local health insurance, two-way airport transfer, orientation, local mobile phone, and more.
     - Optional guided trip to Russia or Belarus. Visas can be obtained from the consulates located in Daugavpils.
     - Full-time in-country support.

The application deadline for the Fall’2017 programs is June 23, 2017.

Please find more on the Semester Abroad programs in Daugavpils at http://www.learnrussianineu.com/semester-abroad-programs

Date Posted: Fri, 03 Mar 2017

Summer Resident Director Position: Intensive Russian Program in Narva, Estonia - June-Aug. 2017 (University of Pittsburgh, CREES)

The University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Russian and East European Studies (REES) is seeking a qualified Resident Director (RD) to accompany a group of undergraduates to Narva, Estonia this summer.  The program runs for 8 weeks—from June 18 – August 13, 2017—though the RD will likely need to arrive one week before the students.  While in Narva, the students will engage in the intensive study of Russian at the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th-year levels.  In addition to formal class time, students participate in a comprehensive set of lectures and excursions.

The RD receives a generous salary as well as roundtrip airfare to Narva, Estonia, accommodations in Narva, daily breakfasts (7 days a week), and work-day lunches (5 days a week).

Primary responsibilities of the Resident Directorship include:
·         Attend all pre-departure orientation sessions conducted by the University of Pittsburgh for participating students; participation via Skype is fine.
·         Run in-country orientation with entire group of students upon group’s arrival to Narva, Estonia.
·         Enforce a Russian-only language policy while students are on campus and on all program-related excursions, lectures, and activities; actively encourage students and all program staff (including staff at the College with whom students have frequent interaction) to speak only in Russian.  Actively converse with the students in the target language at all times, but especially during coffee breaks, group meals, excursions, etc.
·         While in country, liaising with primary point of contact at Narva College of University of Tartu to ensure all program components are being carried through.
·         Organize and facilitate all pre- and post-program proficiency tests.  Help administer all required language proficiency exams (i.e., OPIs and the American Councils for International Education reading and listening exams) during the final week of the program.  All tests will be conducted online.  Coordinate as necessary with Narva College staff to schedule use of computers.
·         Attend and help to arrange (as needed) all excursions, lectures, and out-of-class activities.
·         Submit weekly reports to the REES Associate Director detailing all events of the week, including any student illnesses, disciplinary matters, or other concerns.
·         You must have a cell phone that is operational 24/7.  You must distribute your number to all students, all program instructors and administrators, and be on-call.
·         Prepare students for all program-related excursions and lectures, accompany students on all program-related excursions and at lectures, and run regular debriefing sessions with the students following excursions and lectures.
·         During the third week of classes, hold a meeting with each student to check-in on his/her progress both academically and socially.  Make recommendations to the student to increase his/her success in the program as needed.
·         Be available for student consultations as needed outside regular class time.

Competitive applicants will have experience with study abroad programming, a minimum of advanced-level Russian language proficiency, and past work experience that provides evidence of superior organizational and communication skills.

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until the position is filled.

Please send a cover-letter, CV, and names and contact information of two professional references who can speak to your qualifications for this position to Dawn Seckler (dawn.seckler@pitt.edu).

Date Posted: Fri, 17 Feb 2017