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Jobs

Tenure-Track Assistant Professor position: College of William & Mary

The Programs in European Studies and Russian/Post-Soviet Studies at the College of William and Mary seek applications for a tenure-track position at the assistant professor level, beginning in August 2017.

We are two strong, interdisciplinary area studies programs at one of the best small public universities in the United States, and we are seeking a colleague with a commitment to excellence in teaching and research.

Candidates from all disciplines in the social sciences and humanities with appropriate expertise will be considered, pending department approval. The appointment will be jointly held in the Global Studies Program and in a host department appropriate for the candidate’s discipline. Research and teaching expertise in fields such as state socialism, the First and/or Second World Wars, post-socialist societies, migration, regionalism, and identity politics are particularly welcome.

The successful candidate will be expected to teach “Introduction to European Studies” and “Introduction to Russian and Post-Soviet Studies,” as well as topics courses and research seminars for both programs.

Required Qualifications: Applicants must hold a Ph.D at the time of appointment (August 10, 2017). 
Candidates must possess the skills to teach compelling undergraduate courses in both Russian and Post-Soviet Studies (RPSS) and European Studies (ES), as well as in the candidate’s home department.

Applicants must apply online at https://jobs.wm.edu. Submit a curriculum vitae, a cover letter including statement of research and teaching interests, a writing sample, and three letters of recommendation, at least one of which must speak directly to teaching ability. You will be prompted to submit online the names and email addresses of three references who will be contacted with instructions for how to submit a letter of reference. 
For full consideration, submit application materials by the review date, October 7, 2016. Applications received after the review date will be considered if needed.

The College of William & Mary values diversity and invites applications from underrepresented groups who will enrich the research, teaching and service missions of the university. The College is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and encourages applications from women, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities. The College conducts background checks on applicants for employment. 

Date Posted: Thu, 25 Aug 2016

Lecturer: Polish

The UCLA Department of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Languages and Cultures announces a vacancy for a Polish Lecturer.

Lecturer: Polish

Job #JPF02396

•       L&S HUMANITIES - SLAVIC, EAST EUROPEAN & EURASIAN LANGS

Recruitment Period
Open July 1st, 2016 through March 1st, 2017

If you apply to this recruitment by March 1st, 2017, you will have until March 31st, 2017 to complete your application.

Description
The Department of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Languages and Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles invites applications for the position of Polish language instructor, beginning Fall 2017. This is a half-time, one-year position as Lecturer that includes health benefits, with the possibility of renewal contingent upon a satisfactory performance review and approval of the Dean. Initial teaching load is one three-quarter sequence of Intermediate Polish and one additional course at the discretion of the department.
We are looking for an enthusiastic, creative instructor who has demonstrated experience in teaching different levels of Polish language, including both non-heritage and heritage speakers, as well as a familiarity with contemporary instructional technologies. Complete fluency in Polish and English is required, as is an intimate knowledge of Polish culture. The ideal candidate should hold at least an M.A. Knowledge of another Slavic language a plus.

Applicants should apply online via UCLA Academic Recruit. Please submit a cover letter, CV, teaching statement; and contact information for a minimum of three individuals who have agreed to provide a recommendation letter. The University will contact the referees with instructions on how to submit their letters. We also encourage the applicants to upload, if available, teaching evaluations and sample syllabi and assignments.
Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled.

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age, or protected veteran status. For the complete University of California nondiscrimination and affirmative action policy see: UC Nondiscrimination and Affirmative Action Policy – http://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4000376/NondiscrimAffirmAct

Job location
Los Angeles, CA

Requirements Documents
•       Cover Letter - Letter of application
•       Curriculum Vitae - Your most recently updated C.V.
•       Statement of Teaching
•       Teaching Evaluation (Optional)
•       Sample Syllabi and Assignments (Optional)
•       Statement of Contributions to Diversity - Statement addressing past and/or potential contributions to diversity through research, teaching, and/or service. (Optional)

References
3-5 references required (contact information only)

How to apply
1.      Create an ApplicantID
2.      Provide required information and documents
3.      If any, provide required reference information

Click here to apply now: https://recruit.apo.ucla.edu/apply/JPF02396

Questions? Contact the hiring department

Already applied? Log in to your application

The University of California, Los Angeles is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. You have the right to an equal employment opportunity. For more information about your rights, see the EEO is the Law Supplement. The University of California, Los Angeles is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities. See our Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act Annual Security Reports.

Date Posted: Wed, 24 Aug 2016

Amherst College: Faculty Search: Department of Russian Assistant Professor of Russian

The Amherst College Department of Russian invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position of assistant professor to begin on July 1, 2017. We are looking for a broadly-trained, theoretically-engaged scholar of Russian literature and culture. In addition to having a well-articulated research plan, the successful candidate will be committed to undergraduate and interdisciplinary teaching in a liberal-arts context. Within the last decade, Amherst College has profoundly transformed its student body in terms of socioeconomic status, ethnicity, race, and nationality. Today, nearly one-quarter of Amherst’s students are Pell Grant recipients; 44 percent of our students are domestic students of color; and ten percent of our students are international students. Our expectation is that the successful candidate will excel at teaching and mentoring students who are broadly diverse with regard to race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, nationality, sexual orientation, and religion. Our new colleague will teach two courses per semester, including all levels of Russian language and various aspects of Russia’s cultural legacy; contribute to the core curriculum of the department and the College’s liberal-arts curriculum; and advise undergraduate honors theses. Amherst College is home to an internationally-renowned research institution, the Amherst Center for Russian Culture, and the department’s faculty regularly draws on its collections for teaching and research. The Center’s unique strengths lie in the visual and performing arts, the culture of modernism and the long twentieth century. More information about the department is available at https://www.amherst.edu/mm/13477 , and about the Center for Russian Culture at https://www.amherst.edu/mm/41771 . Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Slavic languages and literatures in hand by the start of the appointment. Native or near-native fluency in Russian and English is required, and prior teaching experience is expected. Interested candidates should submit electronically to https://apply.interfolio.com/35265 a letter of application containing research and teaching statements, C.V., two course syllabi, a writing sample (not to exceed 25 pages), and three confidential letters of recommendation. Review of candidates will begin on September 15, 2016, and continue until the position is filled. Applications received by that date will receive full consideration. Questions about the search should be addressed to bwolfson@amherst.edu. Amherst College is a private undergraduate liberal arts college for men and women, with 1,800 students and more than two hundred faculty members. Located in the Connecticut River Valley of western Massachusetts, Amherst participates with Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts in the Five-College Consortium.

Date Posted: Mon, 22 Aug 2016

Chief of Party/Project Director, Youth Corps Project

Position:          Chief of Party/Project Director, Youth Corps Project
Location:         Kazakhstan 
Practice:          Youth Practice

About IREX

IREX is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to building a more just, prosperous, and inclusive world by empowering youth, cultivating leaders, strengthening institutions, and extending access to quality education and information.

Founded in 1968, IREX has an annual portfolio of over $80 million, offices in 20 countries, and a global staff of 400. We work in more than 100 countries worldwide.


Summary of Position

IREX seeks a senior-level Chief of Party/Project Director to manage an expected Youth Corps Project in Kazakhstan. The purpose of the project is to promote young people’s community engagement and life skills through a community-based service learning program, especially for vulnerable youth. Pilot regions have been identified as Pavlodar, Karaganda, South-Kazakhstan and Almaty oblasts. The Project Director is the senior leadership position with overall responsibility for meeting objectives and management of the program. 

This position is contingent on funding.

 

Summary of Responsibilities:

  • Provide vision and strategic direction for the youth development program focusing on supporting community based service learning and life skills development
  • Serve as primary liaison with senior government officials from the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the World Bank
  • Develop work plans and oversee effective and timely program implementation, ensuring implementation is in line with the project design and donor expectations
  • Provide oversight, input, and technical guidance to the design and delivery of training, outreach, organizational capacity-building, and small grant component for youth and youth-serving organizations
  • Ensure strategic communication of project within Kazakhstan and broadly
  • Manage and mentor project staff
  • Coordinate with home office
  • Oversee project budgeting and ensure budget discipline
  • Oversee monitoring, evaluation, and reporting on program activities

 

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Master‘s degree in a relevant or a related field is required
  • At least 8 years’ experience working on donor-funded education or youth development programming with progressively responsible management experience
  • Demonstrated experience managing multi-million USD budgets
  • Experience working in Kazakhstan or Central Asia preferred
  • Ability to communicate effectively and develop relationships with high-level government officials to influence policy
  • Technical knowledge and experience in skills development, curriculum development, positive youth development, and related support services for youth
  • A proven track record of design, implementation, and successful delivery in similar projects as verified by references
  • Excellent interpersonal skills including conflict resolution abilities; and a demonstrated ability to hold staff accountable for quality outputs and results
  • Experience working on World Bank-funded programs preferred
  • Must be fluent in English; proficiency in Russian and/or Kazakh is a plus

To Apply

Please supply a resume and a cover letter with your application.

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

AA/EOE/M/F/D/V

Date Posted: Mon, 15 Aug 2016

Proposal Writer/Consultant, Kazakhstan Youth Corps Project

Position:          Proposal Writer/Consultant, Kazakhstan Youth Corps Project
Location:         Washington, DC 
Practice:          New Business Development Unit

About IREX

IREX is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to building a more just, prosperous, and inclusive world by empowering youth, cultivating leaders, strengthening institutions, and extending access to quality education and information.

Founded in 1968, IREX has an annual portfolio of over $80 million, offices in 20 countries, and a global staff of 400. We work in more than 100 countries worldwide.


Summary of Position

IREX seeks a Technical Writer to assist in developing a proposal for an anticipated Youth Corps Project in Kazakhstan funded by the World Bank. The purpose of the expected project is to promote young people’s community engagement and life skills through a community-based service learning program, with a focus on vulnerable youth. 

 

Summary of Responsibilities:

  • Working closely with the Proposal Manager, the Technical Writer will have primary responsibility for developing, writing, and ensuring the overall quality of the technical proposal
  • Ensure that the proposal and any partner inputs are of high quality and are well written, in accordance with World Bank and IREX guidelines
  • Develop the proposal based on assessed needs, World Bank interests and the IREX team’s capacities for programming
  • Ensure the technical proposal is submitted for review and submission in a timely manner
  • Other duties as assigned by IREX that furthers the goals and objectives of this proposal

 

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Thorough knowledge of technical aspects of youth development programming including skills development, curriculum development, positive youth development, and related support services for youth
  • Ability to analyze government solicitations, design, and write successful technical proposals in a limited amount of time, and secure donor funding
  • Proven track record of developing high quality proposals that are well written, competitive, responsive to donor-identified impacts and produced in a timely manner
  • Background developing and/or writing World Bank proposals required
  • Experience working in Kazakhstan or Central Asia preferred
  • Bachelor’s degree (Masters preferred) in International Development, Business, or other relevant fields; in addition 5-7 years of relevant work experience
  • Fluency in English; strong written and communication skills required. Russian language skills a plus
  • Motivated self-starter
  • Able to work effectively in a professional team  

To Apply

Please supply a resume and a cover letter with your application.

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

AA/EOE/M/F/D/V

Date Posted: Mon, 15 Aug 2016

Assistant Position, University of Ghent

The Department of East European Languages and Cultures offers an assistant position for young Slavic scholars who have completed the MA and would like to write a dissertation in the field of the philology, linguistics and/or cultural history of premodern Slavic written culture. Further details on the position can be found at:

https://www.ugent.be/en/work/vacancies/assisting/lw21aref2016-08-04e

Date Posted: Fri, 12 Aug 2016

Director, Indiana University Summer Language Workshop, Indiana University Bloomington

The School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, seeks a new leader for its renowned Summer Language Workshop. The opening is for a full-time non-tenure track faculty position, beginning in 2017. The candidate will be responsible for setting the strategic direction of the Workshop and will have full administrative responsibility for its operations. Responsibilities include oversight of curriculum and pedagogy, recruitment of instructors and students, grant writing, fundraising and alumni development, and management of logistical aspects of the annual language workshop. The candidate will be expected to provide strategic direction to the
Summer Language Workshop as it grows, reaches new and diverse student and alumni groups, adapts to trends in language learning, and seeks new funding opportunities.
 
Date Posted: Thu, 11 Aug 2016

SRS Newsletter Editor Needed

The Society for Romanian Studies is looking for one or two new Newsletter Editors to replace Ben Thorne. The Editor serves a 4-year term and has responsibility for soliciting news from members and compiling the SRS biannual newsletter published each Spring and Fall; distributes the newsletter to the membership; and files copies with the SRS Archive. The Editor is a member of the SRS Executive Board. We are looking for a dynamic, well-organized, young scholar or graduate student with interests in Romanian Studies, broadly defined. Editing the Newsletter provides valuable editorial experience, gives one an intimate knowledge of Romanian Studies as a field and the SRS as an organization, and helps generate a positive public profile for the Editor. The Newsletter has been produced by one Editor in the past, but a team of two is also a possibility.
 
Please email Roland Clark (clarkr@liverpool.ac.uk) a copy of your cv, and a short statement about your priorities for the upcoming issues of the Newsletter, and the way in which it can keep our members informed and strength Romanian Studies as a field. Applications will be considered until September 15, 2016.
Date Posted: Tue, 09 Aug 2016

Tenured Senior Faculty, Slavic Languages and Literatures, Yale University

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Yale University intends to make a senior, tenured faculty appointment, beginning on July 1, 2017.   While the area(s) and period(s) of specialization are open, candidates who bring innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to topics in modern Russian literature and culture (such as, for example, theater and performance studies; race and ethnicity studies; or gender and sexuality studies) are especially encouraged to apply.
 
A Ph. D. or equivalent, a record of outstanding scholarly publications, and evidence of superior undergraduate and graduate teaching are required.  We seek a candidate who has also shown intellectual leadership and demonstrated administrative skills.
 
Please submit a detailed letter of application, a C.V., and a minimum of three letters of reference tohttp://apply.interfolio.com/36031, directed to Harvey Goldblatt, Chair, Russian Senior Search Committee. To ensure full consideration, please submit all materials by October 1, 2016. Direct questions to Cheryl.morrison@yale.edu.

Date Posted: Tue, 09 Aug 2016

Assistant Professor - Modern Russian Literature

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of California, Berkeley seeks applications for a full-time faculty position at the Assistant Professor level (tenure track) in modern Russian literature with an expected starting date of July 1, 2017. The Department seeks candidates whose primary specialization is in twentieth-century Russian literature and culture (the long twentieth-century: 1890s to the present). Interest in late-Soviet and post-Soviet literature and culture is welcomed. Interdisciplinary interests and the ability to teach courses in other historical periods are preferred.

For more information about the position, including required qualifications and application materials, go to https://aprecruit.berkeley.edu/apply/JPF01095.  

Deadline to apply is October 3, 2016. 

With questions, please contact issahr@berkeley.edu. UC Berkeley is an AA/EEO employer.

Date Posted: Thu, 04 Aug 2016

Internships

Research Intern - Russia and Eurasia Program

JOB SUMMARY

The CSIS Russia and Eurasia Program (hereinafter REP) seeks individuals with a strong background and interest in Russia and Eurasia as a whole. REP projects involve ongoing analysis of the economic, political and social developments in Eurasia as a whole, Russia, Central Asia, the South Caucasus, Ukraine, and the rest of the former Soviet Union, as well as their impact of U.S. and European policy.

The internship start date is September 1, 2016 and end date is December 31, 2016.

Date Posted: Thu, 04 Aug 2016

Intern, Center for International Media Assistance / Fall 2016, National Endowment for Democracy

Intern, Center for International Media Assistance / Fall 2016 — (Job #1645)

The National Endowment for Democracy (NED) is a congressionally funded, private, nonprofit grant making organization that works to support freedom around the world. The Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA), an initiative of NED, approaches its mission by providing information, building networks, conducting research, and highlighting the indispensable role independent media play in the creation and development of sustainable democracies around the world.

Position Summary:
CIMA is currently seeking an intern for fall 2016. The unpaid internship is open to current graduate or undergraduate students. Working on a small team, the intern will play a key role in supporting CIMA’s core activities, including assisting with events, publications, and mailings. The Intern will also have the opportunity, under CIMA staff guidance, to conduct their own research and contribute to CIMA’s blog on a topic relevant to their interests. The internship is a unique opportunity to learn more about an emerging field in development and media. The position is based in Washington, D.C. 

Requirements:

  • Candidate must be a registered student enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate-level program; and be able to receive college credit or transcript notation of participation in our program for each semester of the internship.  An independent study option, if approved by your university is also possible.
  • Qualified candidates should have excellent writing skills, strong analytical skills, maintain a strong work ethic and have sharp attention to detail.  Students must also have strong computer skills.
  • Applicants should have an interest in journalism, international relations, development, and/or democracy work.

Duties/Responsibilities:

  • Manage CIMA’s subscription-based email listings.
  • Assist with updating and maintaining CIMA’s website, as well as design and format of CIMA reports.
  • Attend meetings and hearings on media development topics as necessary.
  • Assist with arranging and executing meetings, events and social media.

Qualifications:

  • The internship is open to current undergraduate or graduate students.
  • Applicants must have experience with content management systems (Drupal preferred), Adobe Creative Suite (InDesign and Illustrator preferred).
  • Applicants should have an interest in journalism, international relations, development, or democracy work.
  • Applicants with graphic design skills and background are highly desired.

Time Commitment: 24-40 hrs/week (not to exceed 40 hours per week) commitment for the duration of the internship.

Travel Reimbursement: $10/day for commuter expenses

NED Application Deadline: n/a

Anticipated Start Date: o/a September 12, 2016

Orientation Dates: September 12-16, 2016

Anticipate End Date: December 16, 2016

Authorization: Candidates must be authorized to work in the U.S.

How to Apply: Please send a copy of your information about your school’s academic credit for internship program, cover letter, resume, writing sample from a college term paper or something equivalent, and contact information for three professional/academic references.   Please also complete our NED employment application. Please send to jobs@ned.org, with your name and CIMA Fall Intern – Job #1645 in the subject line. The NED is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please, no phone calls. For more information, please visit our website at www.ned.org. 

NED Employment Application form:  http://www.ned.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Full-Employment-Application-2016.pdf

Date Posted: Tue, 19 Jul 2016

Intern, Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program (Int’l Forum for Democratic Studies), National Endowment for Democracy

Intern, Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program (Int’l Forum for Democratic Studies) –

Fall 2016 (Job # 1651)

The National Endowment for Democracy is an independent, bipartisan, grant making organization funded by an annual Congressional appropriation. Its aims are to promote democratic reform and foster civil society worldwide. The Endowment is also the home of the   International Forum for Democratic Studies, the Journal of Democracy, and serves as the secretariat for the World Movement for Democracy. The Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program is an international exchange program that offers practitioners, scholars, and journalists from around the world the opportunity to conduct independent research on democracy in a particular country or region. More information can be found at www.ned.org. The National Endowment for Democracy is an equal opportunity employer.

Position Summary:

The Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program at the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) is seeking a motivated individual to serve as an intern for Fall 2016. This unpaid internship provides professional development opportunities in the area of international exchange, with a focus on the program’s website and social media presence, support for program publications and competition, and database management.  The intern will interact with Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows in residence at the International Forum for Democratic Studies, the research and publications arm of the NED, and participate in the collegial environment of the Forum, including fellows’ presentations and other NED events. 

Duties: 

Intern will assist with:

  • Promotional efforts, including website and social media development
  • Orientation of Fall 2016 Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows
  • Annual Reagan-Fascell fellowship competition, including correspondence with potential applicants and preparation of materials for the selection committee
  • Program publications, both print and electronic
  • Database management and implementation of administrative policies
  • Alumni relations and preparation for the program’s
  • Other duties, as appropriate

Qualifications:

We seek a college student with:

  • interest in human rights and international exchange
  • strong writing, editing, and communications skills
  • organizational skills and attention to detail
  • ability to earn academic credit for the internship
  • experience with database management, website development, and/or social media a plus
  • experience in desktop publishing, electronic publications, and graphic design (InDesign, Photoshop) a plus
  • foreign languages and experience with other cultures a plus

Requirements:

  • Candidate must be a registered student enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate-level program; and be able to receive college credit for each semester they internship with us and therefore must be enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate-level program in a related field.
  • Qualified candidates should have excellent writing skills, strong analytical skills, maintain a strong work ethic and have sharp attention to detail.  Students must also have strong computer skills.

Time Commitment: 24-40 hrs/week (not to exceed 40 hours per week) commitment for the duration of the internship.

NED Application Deadline: n/a

Anticipated Start Date: o/a September 12, 2016

Orientation Dates: September 12-16, 2016

Anticipate End Date: Mid-Dec 2015

Authorization: Candidates must be authorized to work in the U.S.

Travel Reimbursement:

This position is unpaid; however, a reimbursement of $10 per day is available to offset commuter expenses.

How to Apply: Please send a copy of your completed application for academic credit for internship, cover letter, resume, NED employment application, writing sample from a college term paper or something equivalent, and contact information for three references.  Please send to jobs@ned.org, with your name and Intern, Reagan Fascell Fellows (Fall 2016) – Job #1651 in the subject line. The NED is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please no phone calls. For more information, please visit our website at www.ned.org.

Date Posted: Tue, 19 Jul 2016

Intelligence Analysis Summer Intern Program, National Security Agency (NSA)

Are you looking for an opportunity that will provide innovative professional work experiences that are significant and meaningful to your career and academic goals, enable you to explore the fascinating and unique world of intelligence, and give you the opportunity to serve your country? Look no further than the National Security Agency (NSA).  NSA's Intelligence Analysis (IA) Summer Internship offers the opportunity for training in a multi-faceted cryptologic discipline. The IA Summer Internship offers full-time paid internships for undergraduate and master's degree students each year. It is an intensive 12-week program that gives rising college seniors or graduate level students the opportunity to build knowledge and skills in the intelligence analysis field. 

You Are Part Of The Team! One Mission One Team!
You will receive training and be part of the team from day one. You will be assigned a supervisor and mentor to help you quickly learn and acclimate. During your first two weeks on the team, you will participate in the IA Internship orientation to become familiar with various policies, practices, procedures and key players at NSA and the IC.  

Your Contribution to the Community/Mission
As an NSA summer intern, you will participate in training and an apprenticeship to senior NSA analysts on vital strategic intelligence targets pertaining to special and ongoing projects. The projects and the accompanying analysis supports NSA's effort to provide a complete SIGINT picture to U.S. policy makers, military commanders, and other Intelligence Community (IC) members and partners.  

Specific skills obtained include:
- Gaining sound knowledge of the fundamental concepts of modern digital communications, particularly in the context of mobile communication systems
- Implementing network structure analysis or Analyzing network structures
- Using advanced analytic tools and techniques
- Executing advanced query techniques 
- Gaining a working knowledge of the structure and processes of the IC by being immersed in signals intelligence/intelligence topics, projects, conferences, and meetings  
- Conducting independent and original research, and documenting and communicating findings to help satisfy customer requirements
- Applying logic, analysis, creativity, judgment and systematic approaches to gather, evaluate and use information/intelligence

Qualifications

- Must be a U.S. citizen
- Must be eligible to be granted a security clearance 
- Must be a full-time undergraduate student entering the final year of a degree program or a graduate level student 
- Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5 preferred; Strong candidates with a slightly lower GPA will be considered on a case by case basis as space allows
- Must be available for the entire 12-week program
- Must be available for an operational interview and other applicable processing between May 2016 and March 2017
- Major studies areas of consideration:
o International Affairs/Politics/Relations
o Intelligence/Security Studies
o Regional Studies
o Decision/Information/Data Science
o Note: Majors/Minors/Certificate programs or multiple courses in computer science, networking, cyber security, physics, technology, telecommunications and geography areas are highly sought 
- Students attending schools designated by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence as an Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence (IC CAE) in National Security Studies and designated as IC Scholars are particularly encouraged to apply. IC CAE schools are listed on our Institutions Page.

Clearance/Security Requirements
Applicants will be processed for a security clearance, and will be required to pass a psychological exam, lifestyle and counter intelligence polygraph, drug screening test, and complete a comprehensive history form that documents your foreign travel, educational background and employment history, among other areas.

Application Deadline
Applications for the 2017 program are accepted 15 May - 15 October 2016.

Salary
The NSA internship is a PAID internship.  Students will earn a competitive salary commensurate with their education level.

Benefits and Housing 
Interns will receive the following benefits:
- Annual leave, sick leave and paid federal holidays 
- Participation in agency-wide extracurricular programs 
- Round trip airfare ticket to and from school, or mileage reimbursement up to the cost of a government-issued airline ticket for students who attend schools in excess of 75 miles from Ft. Meade, MD
- Subsidized housing accommodations are available upon request if school is located in excess of 75 miles from NSA main HQs campus 
- Interns are  hired on a temporary appointment, and are not eligible for health insurance, life insurance, or Thrift Savings Plan benefits

Application instructions

*Please be sure to indicate that you saw this position on Globaljobs.org*

To apply, please see here.

Date Posted: Wed, 01 Jun 2016

Funding

Harriman Institute Russian Politics Postdoctoral Fellowship 2016-17

2016-2017 RUSSIAN POLITICS POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP


The Harriman Institute of Columbia University invites applications for a Russian Politics postdoctoral fellowship. This fellowship begins October 1, 2016, and is for the academic year 2016-17 (with a possible renewal for academic year 2017-18) and is open to scholars conducting research in Russian politics. The fellowship comes with a salary of $50,000/year (with benefits). This postdoctoral fellowship is provisional and contingent upon Harriman’s receipt of a grant.

Requirements

The Russian Politics Postdoctoral Fellow’s responsibilities would include conducting his/her own research and developing and coordinating a seminar on policy debates about Russia (AY 2016-2017 and with potential renewal in AY 2017-2018) with Professors Timothy Frye, Kimberly Marten and Alexander Cooley. Each Fellow is required to be in residence in the New York City area.

Eligibility

We encourage applications from Social Science disciplines. The applicant’s research must focus on Russian politics.

Fellowships are open to young scholars who received the Ph.D. in a relevant discipline between July 31, 2013 and August 31, 2016 and do not hold a tenure-track position.

Recipients must have completed all their Ph.D. requirements (completed and deposited the dissertation) by August 31, 2016.

Application Process


The following list of materials is required for all applicants:

  • Curriculum Vitae.
  • Research proposal: 2-3 page statement describing the research project you would pursue at Columbia University if awarded a fellowship, indicating its relation (if any) to your doctoral dissertation, as well as its relation to the mission of the Harriman Institute.
  • A writing sample, such as an article or dissertation chapter.
  • Letters of recommendation: 2 letters of reference that include an evaluation of your research.
  • Previous Education: Indicate on your curriculum vitae each college and university you have attended, with the inclusive dates.

All application materials (including letters of reference) must be received by the Institute on or before September 15, 2016. Candidates may be invited for a phone interview. All evaluations made in connection with applications received are confidential.

Awards will be announced no later than September 23, 2016.

Please send completed application materials by email in a single PDF file to Alla Rachkov ar2052@columbia.edu. Letters of recommendation should be sent separately by the referees to Alla Rachkov ar2052@columbia.edu by that deadline. For questions, please contact Alla Rachkov at 212-854-9713.

For more information, please see http://harriman.columbia.edu/

Date Posted: Tue, 23 Aug 2016

SOYUZ Article Prize

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies announces the opening of its first *Article Prize competition* for the best article related to the culture, history, politics of postsocialism by a junior scholar. This prize recognizes significant contributions to the advancement of scholarly understandings of postsocialism, broadly defined.  Articles published in 2015 and 2016 by a scholar who has earned a PhD within the past six years (2010 or later) are eligible. Scholars from any discipline with any geographic area of interest are encouraged to apply. Submissions should be sent electronically to Jennifer Carroll at
jennifer_carroll@brown.edu no later than *September 1*. /Please include "Soyuz Article Prize" in the subject line. 

Date Posted: Mon, 15 Aug 2016

2017 Rangel Graduate Fellowship Program

The Rangel Graduate Fellowship is a program that aims to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers in the Foreign Service in which they can help formulate, represent and implement U.S. foreign policy.  The Rangel Program will select 30 outstanding Rangel Fellows annually in a highly competitive nationwide process and helps support them through two years of graduate study, internships and professional development activities, and entry into the Foreign Service. This program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service and those with financial need.  Fellows who successfully complete the program and Foreign Service entry requirements will receive appointments as Foreign Service Officers, one of the most exciting and rewarding careers available.

http://www.rangelprogram.org/?session.areaid

Date Posted: Tue, 09 Aug 2016

Watson Institute Postdoctoral Fellows Program, Brown University

The Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown University aspires to promote a just and peaceful world through research, teaching, and public engagement.  Central to this mission is the Watson Postdoctoral Fellows Program, an effort to galvanize the careers of young social scientists conducting research related to the Institute's three core thematic areas: development, governance, and security. Participants in this program will join an interdisciplinary community of scholars engaged in theoretically and substantively important research addressing the most pressing global issues of our time. Fellows receive two years of support, to be taken within a three-year period, with the expectation that they will pursue research and participate fully in the intellectual life of the Institute. Fellows will also teach one course per year in the Institute or in an affiliated Brown University social science department.

https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=53267

Date Posted: Tue, 09 Aug 2016

2017 JDC Archives Fellowship Program

The JDC Archives is pleased to announce that it is accepting applications for its 2017 fellowship program. In 2017, 5-6 fellowships will be awarded to senior scholars, postdoctoral researchers, graduate students, and independent researchers to conduct research in the JDC Archives, either in New York or in Jerusalem. Research topics in the fields of twentieth century Jewish history, modern history, social welfare, migration, and humanitarian assistance will be considered, as well as other areas of academic research covered in the JDC archival collections. For more information, and to apply, visit http://archives.jdc.org/about-us/fellowships.html. The fellowship awards are $2500-$5000. The deadline to submit applications is January 15, 2017.

The JDC Archives holds the institutional records of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee since its founding in 1914.

The online database with documents, photographs, and a names index is available at http://search.archives.jdc.org. Finding aids can be accessed here: http://archives.jdc.org/explore-the-archives/using-the-archives.html

Date Posted: Fri, 29 Jul 2016

Graduate College Dissertation Travel Grants

University of Illinois Graduate College - Dissertation Travel Grants (Fall Competition)
 
Deadline(s): Anticipated 9/2016
Departmental nomination required
Dissertation Travel Grants provide reimbursement to subsidize travel and associated costs necessary for doctoral dissertation research, whether for exploring a potential dissertation topic (i.e., before extensive research has been done) or for conducting dissertation research. Approximately 12 grants at amounts up to $5,000 will be awarded given sufficient funding.  An awardee's nominating department must commit to contributing 12% of the cost of the grant.
The criteria used in making awards are the necessity for travel; the significance, coherence, and feasibility of the proposed research as determined from the proposal; and letters of support. The student's productivity and efficient progress toward the degree as shown in the academic record are also evaluated.  Students who have already received a Graduate College dissertation travel grant are not eligible. Grants will not be awarded for travel that has taken place prior to the completion of the competition process. 
Departments may submit up to three nominations.
 
Eligibility:
  • Applicants must be enrolled in a program leading to the PhD, DMA, or EdD.
  • Travel funded through the fall 2016 competition must begin no later than December 31, 2017 and must be completed by May 31, 2018.
  • Students do not need to be registered at the time of application or during the time of travel.
Award Amounts:  Awards are contingent on availability of funds. The budget should be cost-effective and commensurate with the distance and time of travel. The highest priority for awards will be transportation expenses. Other allowable expenses include lodging, food, insurance, research passes or permits, visas, and required vaccinations, but these expenses may receive lower priority due to budget constraints. Expenses not allowed include expenses for any travel that has already occurred; travel expenses for colleagues, personal companions, or other participants; cost of using a university vehicle; participant incentives; equipment; supplies; photocopies; conference travel; course registration; and tuition.
 
Nomination Procedure:
Students must be nominated by their department, and departments may nominate up to three students each. Students, nominating officials, and letter writers should each submit their respective materials to the department's contact person by the department's internal deadline (check with the department's Director of Graduate Studies to identify the appropriate contact person and ascertain the deadline).  The department must then scan materials into a single pdf, and the file should be named as follows: LastName, FirstName - DeptAbbreviation - DissTravel2016 (for example: Smith, John - Psych - DissTravel2016).   The pdf should then be uploaded to this online Box folder by the campus deadline.
Please note that there are formatting guidelines for each of the required items indicated below.  Nomination packages containing items that do not follow the formatting guidelines will be disqualified without review.
The nomination package must contain the following six documents, arranged in the following order:
1.  Dissertation Completion Nomination Form, as completed by the nominating official (either the Department Head or the Director of Graduate Studies).  As part of the form, the nominating official must include a statement supporting the nomination as well as a note explaining how the department ranked its nominees.  Refer to the Nomination Form for more specific guidance on writing the statement.
2.  CV.  The CV is limited to three pages, and it must have one-inch margins and at least 11-point font throughout.
3.  Research Proposal. The Research Proposal must be written in an accessible, jargon-free manner appropriate for a multidisciplinary review panel, and it should explain and justify the specific activities to be undertaken during the grant period. The research proposal is limited to three pages, and it must be double-spaced, in Times New Roman, with 12-point font and one-inch margins.  The proposal should include the following elements:
·         Introduction/Problem Statement. (In this section, the research question, hypothesis, or engineering goal must be stated explicitly.)
·         Background and Significance.
·         Preliminary research.
·         Methodology.
·         Timeline.
·         Expected outcomes.
Within the above sections, the research proposal should explain how the proposed travel is essential for the research, including specific locations and dates of travel. The student should indicate how far he/she has progressed in the research project, what remains to be done, and how the research would contribute to the quality and timely completion of the dissertation. If the research project involves human subjects or vertebrate animals, the student should indicate what steps have been or will be taken to secure the necessary approvals. 
A separate one-page References Cited section is allowed (must be single-spaced, in Times New Roman, with 12-point font and one-inch margins).  No appendices or other supplemental sections are allowed.
4.  Dissertation Travel Grant Budget Worksheet, as completed by the student. The worksheet must give the dates of travel and also specify and justify expenses up to $5,000 during the proposed travel. Do not use per diem calculations. Indicate the source of the budget estimates (travel agency, website, etc.). The worksheet should be accompanied by a brief (~1/2 page) budget justification narrative explaining each of the items requested.
5.  Letter of support from the student's thesis director that discusses the importance of the proposed travel within the overall significance of the dissertation, the student's academic and research accomplishments, and the student’s specific stage in the degree program (milestones passed, requirements remaining to be completed, and estimated length of time to degree completion).  The letter must be a maximum of two pages, in 12-point font and with one-inch margins.
6.  Current University of Illinois transcript (unofficial will suffice).
 
Reporting Requirements: All Dissertation Travel Grant recipients are required to submit a one-page report and reimbursement paperwork within one month after travel has concluded.
 
Disbursement: Funds are disbursed in the form of a reimbursement following submission and review of all required reporting materials.
 
Contact: For further information contact the Graduate College Fellowship Office at 333-0036 or GradCompetitions@illinois.edu.
Date Posted: Mon, 25 Jul 2016

Graduate College Master's Project Travel Grant

University of Illinois Graduate College - Master's Project Travel Grants (Fall Competition)
 
Deadline(s): Anticipated 9/2016
Departmental nomination required
The Graduate College's Master's Project Travel Grants provide reimbursement for travel-related costs incurred for the completion of an off-campus, short-term project required of one of the University’s masters degree programs.  Approximately 10 grants of up to $500 will be awarded given sufficient funding.  Grant recipients are expected to conclude their travel by August 31, 2017.
Selection criteria include necessity for travel, significance and feasibility of the project, and the applicant’s academic record and accomplishments. Budget constraints may call for the selection committee to give priority to nominees in terminal masters programs.
 
Eligibility:
Only projects that satisfy
all three of the following requirements are eligible:
  • The project is short-term.
  • The project satisfies requirements for master’s degree.
  • The required project takes place outside of Urbana-Champaign (i.e., travel is required).
Typical projects would include thesis research, travel for performance or exhibition that is required for degree completion, or final projects required for degree completion.  Projects not eligible for support include internships, practicums, independent study, conference travel, and traveling for a performance or exhibition that is not required for degree completion.
 
Allowable Expenses:
Allowable expenses include transportation, lodging, food, and other travel-related expenses.  Expenses not allowable include equipment, supplies, photocopies, phone, internet access, participant incentives, and course registration.
 
Nomination Process:
Students must be nominated by their department, and departments may nominate up  to
three students each.
Students, nominating officials, and letter writers should each submit their respective materials to the department's contact person by the department's internal deadline (check with the department's Director of Graduate Studies to identify the appropriate contact person and ascertain the deadline).  The department must then scan materials into a single pdf, and the file should be named as follows: LastName, FirstName - DeptAbbreviation - MATravel2016 (for example: Smith, John - Psych - MATravel2016).   The pdf should then be uploaded to this online Box folder by the campus deadline.
Note that there are formatting guidelines for each of the required items indicated below.  Nomination packages containing items that do not follow the formatting guidelines will be disqualified without review.
The nomination package should contain the following documents, arranged in the following order:
  • Master's Travel Grant Nomination Form (note new form for 2016-17), as completed by the Director of Graduate Studies or Department Head.
  • CV (three-page limit, with one-inch margins and at least 11-point font throughout).
  • Project summary (two-page limit, double-spaced, 12-point font, one-inch margins, Times New Roman). The summary should detail the nature of the project (e.g. thesis research, required final project, exhibition, performance) including its significance, specific activities, location, dates, and intended results. Any citations must be included in the two-page limit.
  • Budget (one-page limit).  The budget page should include all items requested, complete with budget notes explaining each item.  Also indicate sources of the budget estimates.
  • Letter of support (two page limit) from nominee’s advisor that describes the project’s role in the degree completion process and discusses the significance of the proposed project along with the student’s academic record and accomplishments.
  • Current University of Illinois transcript (unofficial will suffice).
Follow-Up Report:
All grant recipients are required to submit a one-page report and reimbursement paperwork within one month after travel has concluded.
 
Contact Information:
For further information contact the Graduate College Fellowship Office at 333-0036 or GradCompetitions@illinois.edu
.
Date Posted: Mon, 25 Jul 2016

Princeton University Postdoctoral Fellowship 2017-20

Four postdoctoral fellowships are available in the Princeton Society of Fellows for 2017-20.  The fields are: Open; Humanistic Studies; LGBT Studies; Race and/or Ethnicity Studies.  
 
We seek a diverse and international pool of applicants and especially welcome candidates from underrepresented backgrounds. We hope you will encourage outstanding graduate students to apply—those now finishing their Ph.D., and those who received their degree after January 1, 2015.    
 
For more information and to apply, please see http://www.princeton.edu/sf/fellowships/ 
 
Our postmark application deadline is September 15, 2016. 
Date Posted: Tue, 19 Jul 2016

Call for Applications - SSRC Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship & Global Summer Semester Residency at the University of Göttingen

Call for Applications

Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship:

InterAsian Contexts and Connections

& Global Summer Semester Residency at the University of Göttingen

Applications due September 19, 2016

The Social Science Research Council is pleased to invite preliminary applications for its recently expanded and enhanced Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship, funded with generous support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Following on three successful grants cycles, through which more than fifty individual fellowships totaling nearly 2 million USD have been awarded, the SSRC is continuing its transregional grants program, offering a 2016 Junior Scholar grants competition and awarding approximately twenty grants of up to $45,000 to researchers in any world region. 

In addition, working closely with the CETREN Transregional Research Network at the University of Göttingen in Germany, the SSRC is pleased to offer a new category of fellowship in 2016 – the SSRC Global Summer Semester Residencyat the University of Göttingen (residency dates April 15, 2017–July 15, 2017).Note: this award is subject to final grant approval from the German Ministry of Education and Research.

These fellowships are aimed at supporting transregional research, strengthening the understanding of issues and geographies that do not fit neatly into existing divisions of academia or the world, and developing new approaches, practices, and opportunities in international, regional, and area studies. These fellowships help junior scholars (those at the postdoctoral stage, up to five years out of the PhD) complete first books and/or undertake second projects. In addition to funding research, the fellowships will create networks and shared resources that will support fellows well beyond the grant period through intensive workshops and activities that promote transregional perspectives on individual campuses. The Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship and Global Summer Semester Residency will thus provide promising scholars support at critical junctures in their careers, advance transregional research, and establish structures for linking scholars across disciplines in the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences.

The broad intellectual thrust of the fellowships will continue to be InterAsian Contexts and Connections, or the reconceptualization of Asia as an interlinked historical and geographic formation stretching from West Asia through Eurasia, Central Asia, and South Asia to Southeast Asia and East Asia. In addition, applications that explore the networks that connect Asia with Africa are encouraged for the 2016 awards cycle. Proposals should bear upon processes that connect places and peoples across the boundaries of regions and countries (such as religion, migration/diaspora, media, literature and other arts, shared access to natural resources, cultural and economic continua, and resource flows), those that reconfigure local and translocal contexts (such as shifting borders, urbanization, and social movements), and those that are situated at the nexus of the global/regional/local (such as youth culture, tourist arts, illicit flows).

Invitational priorities for the 2016–2017 Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship include:  

  • Afro-Asian Connections
  • Environmental Humanities
  • Religious Networks
  • Migration & Refugees
  • Resources & Archives

This does not preclude proposals on other topics.

Invitational priorities for the 2017 Global Summer Semester Residencies include:

  • Movements of Knowledge
  • Media, Migration, and the Moving Political
  • Religious Networks

This does not preclude proposals on other topics that engage with existing research expertise at the University of Göttingen.

Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellows will be selected through a two-part application process. Upon review of the preliminary applications submitted in September, the Selection Committee will invite select applicants to submit full narrative proposals in fall 2016. Fellowships will be awarded in spring 2017, and fellowship funds can be disbursed flexibly over the sixteen month period between April 1, 2017 and August 1, 2018.

Global Summer Semester Residency fellowships will be awarded in fall 2016.

The application processes, eligibility criteria, and award amounts vary across competitions. Applications and additional fellowship details, including former fellows’ research abstracts and answers to frequently asked questions, are available on the program website at:

http://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/transregional-research-fellowship.

For additional inquiries, please contact us at transregional@ssrc.org
 

Date Posted: Mon, 27 Jun 2016

Submissions

CfP: "Reluctant heritage: Revisiting museums and memory sites in Central and Eastern Europe in a transnational perspective", Bucharest, CEREFREA, 4-5 November 2016 [DL: September 15th]

A troubled and segmented East-European history has given rise to a troubled and segmented museum history. Museums in Central and Eastern Europe have found themselves, time and again, faced with difficult and uncomfortable choices. Immediately after the Second World War, museums had to update their exhibitions in order to narrate radically different stories. One of the major changes also included exhibiting the socialist present, such as the accomplishments of the regime, and the recent past: the violent, revolutionary coming to power of communist parties all over Eastern Europe became part of the permanent exhibition of local and national museums. Museums also had to literally hide entire collections that were suddenly found inappropriate. After the fall of communism, these collections were brought back to museum halls (although much of their history, documentation and context had been lost) and it was time for the communist collections to become bothersome and thus be hidden or even destroyed.

The workshop seeks to explore the specificities of reaction to political and social change in the context of museums and heritage sites. Museums could be considered in terms of their historiographic and political foundations, as the outcome of mobilizations of a wide variety of actors who have contributed to their creation or their dismantling (museum professionals, architects, academics, public historians, victims’ associations and other cultural brokers). In some contexts, the heritage process has contributed to a discursive criminalisation of previous regimes – for instance the transformation of detention centres in museums or memory sites. In others, it has facilitated implicit forms of rehabilitation, under the guise of commercially exploiting the legacy – architectural, artistic, political – of the former regime. Finally, a significant number of museums and memory sites were faced with the challenge and task of reinvesting their collections with a new meaning and a new narrative, framed in new historiographies and nation-building projects.

Within this framework, our workshop will bring together contributions that respond to one or more of the following aspects, relating to the central concern on whether museum displays and heritage sites have been remade to conform to new scientific and political narratives/ agendas:

- will examine case-studies of metamorphoses of East-European museums and built heritage during the Cold War and in post-communism. 
- will discuss whether museums are sometimes in the vanguard of social and political change or are they merely reacting to societal transformations.
- will analyse how museums and heritage sites have been mobilized to qualify, and at times to criminalize the socialist period
- will seek to highlight the emergence and circulation of heritage models at national, regional and trans-regional levels, evident in the museums established in former detention centres, in the management of heritage assets related to past dictatorial regimes, and in the reconfigurations of exhibitions in museums around the area. 
- will expand the debate by bringing case-studies of transnational processes going beyond the European borders (with a particular interest in Latin America)
- will bring theoretical and methodological insights into the study of processes of heritage-making from a transnational perspective.

Please submit 300-word abstracts and a short bio (in English or in French) to reluctantheritage@gmail.com by September 15th. The successful participants will be notified by September 20th. 

While the conference will be bilingual, in English and French, no simultaneous translation will be provided. 

Funds are available to cover the expenses (travel or accommodation) for a limited number of participants. Please indicate in your paper proposal whether you will be seeking this funding.

Convenors:
Gruia Bădescu, University of Oxford
Simina Bădică, National Museum of the Romanian Peasant
Nelly Bekus, University of Exeter
Damiana Oțoiu, University of Bucharest

The workshop is organized by the Regional Center for Advanced Francophone Research in Social Sciences (CEREFREA Villa Noël), University of Bucharest and supported by the following institutions and projects: 
- Museums and Controversial Collections. Politics and Policies of Heritage-Making in Post-Colonial and Post-socialist Contexts project of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research and Innovation, CNCS – UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-2368, New Europe College, Bucharest.
- AHRC (Care for the Future) - LABEX Pasts in the Present joint funded project The Criminalization of Dictatorial Pasts in Europe and Latin America in Global Perspective, University of Exeter and Institut des Sciences Sociales du Politique, Paris.
- Political Science Department, University of Bucharest.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/326636824342738/

Date Posted: Fri, 19 Aug 2016

CFP: 1917-2017 One hundred years of graphic (r)evolution in the Soviet space

Deadline for submitting proposal: 30th of August 2016

 

Description of the Call for papers

The last century has witnessed dramatic changes in the written history of many communities of the Russian empire and the Soviet Union, first of all the elimination of illiteracy (ликвидация безграмотности), which consisted in the creation of new alphabets for unwritten languages and the change or simply reform of already existing ones (вооружение или перевооружение письменностью in SUCHOTIN 1932: 95).
As it is well known, this ideologically-driven activity (SEBBA 2006) involved different strategies: Latinisation campaign in the 20s and 30s (BALDAUF 1993), Cyrillicisation from 1938 (FRINGS 2012), again Latinisation after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Aiming at the creation of a national identity based on language (GRENOBLE 2003: 20), this process was accompanied by a significant development of linguistic and sociolinguistic research work (SIMONATO 2008, BRANDIST 2003), which was carried out by such eminent linguists as E. D. Polivanov, N. F. Jakovlev and others.

Eligible topics

These questions will be looked at from different perspectives in the special issue of «Studi Slavistici» (volume 14 – 2017). We invite therefore to submit papers dealing with the following topics:

  • graphic and/or orthographic reforms
  • language policy with particular relation to writing systems
  • Latinisation, Cyrillicisation
  • Marr’s analytical alphabet
  • the birth of phonology as a field of applied work
  • problems of (phonetic) transcription and transliteration
 

Guidelines for submission

Contributors are expected to discuss theoretical and/or descriptive issues using data from different languages of the USSR and its successor states.

Proposals, with title, a short abstract (no more than 2,000 characters with spaces) and a brief profile of the author (300-600 characters) should be sent to studislavistici@associazioneslavisti.com by the 30th of August 2016. Accepted languages are Italian, English, French, German, Spanish and any of the Slavic languages.
Notification of acceptance or non-acceptance will be communicated by the end of September 2016.

The deadline for the submission of the accepted papers, which should not exceed 60,000 signs, spaces and bibliography included, is the 30th of March 2017.

Organizer

Information & contacts

Studi Slavistici
ISSN 1824-7601 (online);
ISSN 1824-761X (print)
Info: dott.ssa Giuseppina Larocca (studislavistici@associazioneslavisti.com)
Print Issues: Firenze University Press, Via Cittadella, 7 – 50122 Firenze – Italy

Date Posted: Tue, 09 Aug 2016

CFP: Film History - Special Issue: “Amateur Film and the Institution”

CALL FOR PAPERS
Film History - Special Issue: “Amateur Film and the Institution”
Guest Editors: Enrique Fibla, Masha Salazkina (Concordia University)
Deadline for abstracts: October 15th, 2016

In recent years, Film Studies scholarship began to pay more attention to the effects that various non-theatrical film initiatives – such as educational, industrial, and other institutional productions - have had on the way modern life is ordered, experienced and imagined. Although amateur film initiatives have sometimes been included in such debates, their relationship to professional film expressions and institutions has not yet been explored in depth. Usually deemed a mere hobby devoted to recording family gatherings and trips, amateur cinema’s rich history as a vernacular media form, with its own journals, circulation circuits, and particular relationship to actuality is yet to be fully explored. Likewise, the current amateur digital media explosion has gathered scholarly attention, but it remains to be articulated in relation to a more comprehensive history of vernacular media. Such histories can potentially allow for a new map and timeline of moving image production to emerge: countries or regions previously deemed peripheral for film history due to their lack of a strong film industry may become relevant to rethink the space that film occupies in cultural history globally.
With these ideas in mind, the Amateur Film and the Institution special issue looks to discuss the different implications of amateur cinema around the world in relation to the technological, social, cultural, and economic developments that marked its emergence in different contexts. The changing discourses on the status of amateurism vs. professional aesthetics have also shaped much of film criticism and theory, emerging with particular force at certain moments in history. A central task of the special issue will be to interrogate the relationship between amateur practices and broader film institutional developments and open a conversation by addressing a range of questions, such as: What role did amateur production play in the institutionalization of film? What kind of alternative institutions did amateurs create? How does the development of these practices and discourses impact our understanding of the history and geography of moving images?

We invite contributions from scholars and practitioners to submit paper proposal on the history of film amateur practices around the world. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

-Archival institutions and non-professional film
-Non-professional film movements, journals, and festivals
-Amateur pornography
-Political potential of amateur cinema
-Amateur filmmaking and experimental/avant-garde cinema
-Self-made productions and the contemporary digital culture
-DIY technologies and aesthetics
-Amateur film in relation to industrial and educational films
-Histories of critical debates about the status of “the amateur” in film and media
-New geographies of moving image history beyond commercial film
-The impact of the study of amateur cinema on film historiography


Send a 500-600 word abstract and a brief biographical note to enrique.fibla@concordia.ca and salazkina.masha@gmail.com by October 15th 2016. The editorial team will notify selected proposals by November 1st 2016. Completed manuscripts (up to 9,000 words) will be due February 1st 2017, and will be accepted for publication pending editorial and external readers evaluation. All submissions will be subjected to double blind peer review.
For further information on Film History journal submission guidelines see:http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/pages.php?pID=78&CDpath=4

In addition to scholarly articles, we invite submissions of relevant previously unpublished original documents on this topic, in English or in translation, to be included in the special issue.

Date Posted: Tue, 09 Aug 2016

CFA: 'Gender & Historical Film and Television' Special Issue

Call for Abstracts:  Special Issue of Gender & History on 'Gender & Historical Film and Television' (Volume 30, Issue 3, November 2018)

Edited by Siobhan Craig (University of Minnesota), Carol Donelan (Carleton College) and Felice Lifshitz (University of Alberta)

Gender & History calls for article abstracts for a special issue on ‘Gender & Historical Film and Television’. Throughout the history of moving pictures, the construction of various versions of ‘the past’ has been a constant preoccupation in narrative films and television programs, as well as in documentary and educational films and television. These depictions generally mediate gender ideologies in (at least) two temporal contexts: the time period they represent and, perhaps more importantly, the time period in which they were made. Gender construction and representation (including cultural constructions of femininity, masculinity, fluid and transgender identities) are key areas of interest, as are renditions of other forms of difference, such as race or sexuality. A crucial question to ask, therefore, is what kind of cultural ‘work’ do historically themed films and TV shows do? We encourage contributors to think contextually and critically about how gender informs both the ‘pasts’ constructed in films and TV shows and the reception of those media at the time of their creation. We welcome proposals that engage ethnic, regional, national, transnational and global film or television traditions, as well as those that address gender intersectionally in connection with other categories of difference and power including but not limited to race, gender identity, class, sexuality, religion, ethnicity and ability. We encourage both disciplinary and interdisciplinary historical approaches. Although we discourage proposals that are focused primarily on evaluating relative degrees of historical accuracy in representations of the past, abstracts should make clear how the proposed paper engages with both gender analysis and historical analysis.  Interested authors are encouraged to consult the extended version of this call for abstracts on the Gender & History website.

The production of the special issue will follow a symposium, to be held at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in late April or early May 2017 (precise date to be announced), whose participants will be selected on the basis of the abstracts submitted. Please submit 1-2 page abstracts in English (500-750 words maximum) to gendhist@umn.edu by 31 August 2016, with ‘Special Issue 30:3 abstract submission’ in the subject line. (Limited funds for the translation of articles written in other languages might be available). Invitations to present at the symposium will be issued in November 2016. Papers must be submitted for pre-circulation to the editors by 30 March 2017. After the symposium the editors will select papers to be considered for publication, and revised versions of selected papers must be received by 1 September 2017. Manuscripts will then immediately enter the peer-review process so that the editors can produce the issue by May 2018 for publication in November 2018.

Date Posted: Thu, 21 Jul 2016

CFP: Yearbook of Transnational History

Call for Submissions: Yearbook of Transnational History

The Yearbook of Transnational History is inviting scholars to submit articles for its inaugural volume to be published in spring 2018.

The Yearbook of Transnational History is a newly established peer-reviewed annual to be published by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press/Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group. This annual is dedicated to publishing and disseminating pioneering research in the field of transnational history to an international audience.

Undertaking transnational history means breaking free from national paradigms. The concept of transnational history is built upon the premise that historical processes, their causes, and their consequences are not contained within nations. The transnational approach attempts to recover history as a global experience and as a universal project. It is based on the realization that humans have always lived in an interconnected world. Instead of researching and writing the history of particular phenomena within the confines of any given nation state, the paradigm of transnational history encourages historians to follow trends, events, and people in all directions that they went. Transnational history is, thus, focused on the circulation of notions, images, things, living beings, capital, and practices across various cultures and societies around the globe and the creation/disruption of relations and spaces that shape the perception and reality of individuals.

The Yearbook of Transnational History will be open to contributions that fit this agenda. Articles considered for inclusion will follow human and non-human historical protagonists in various geographic settings and recreate the transnational configurations that have been obscured by the national history paradigm.

We welcome articles from both professionals and advanced PhD students that are based upon original research on a broad range in both spatial and topical terms from the modern era (i.e. eighteenth to the twentieth century). Articles should be between 7,000 and 10,000 words long (including footnotes) and follow Chicago Style.

Submissions should be emailed to the editor, Professor Thomas Adam, adam@uta.edu by November 1, 2016 to be considered for inclusion in the first volume. Please ensure that you have included all relevant contact information on a separate page, including your name, your professional or institutional affiliation, and a permanent e-mail address.

Date Posted: Thu, 21 Jul 2016

CFP: New Journal: Antisemitism Studies

Antisemitism Studies
Call for Submissions

Deadline for first issue: September 15, 2016
Deadline for second issue: December 15, 2016

The editor of Antisemitism Studies welcomes the submission of manuscripts that will contribute to the scholarly study of antisemitism. We will consider articles on specific antisemitic episodes, and their historical significance and impact on society, as well as more thematic and theoretical studies of the phenomenon. Authors may work from any disciplinary perspective, address any cultural, national, or religious context, and study any period of history, including the present. We are particularly interested in articles that appeal to a broad international audience of scholars in the humanities and social sciences.

For detailed information on manuscript preparation and to sign up to our email list please visit: antisemitismstudies.com.

Manuscripts should be submitted via the Indiana University Press website:  https://scholarworks.iu.edu/iupjournals/index.php/ant/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Antisemitism Studies adheres to a double–blind peer review process in which the identities of the author and reviewers remain confidential. Please note that the formal evaluation process on all submissions takes approximately three to four months, and the period between acceptance of an article and its publication is between nine months and one year.

Book reviews are generally solicited by the editor; however, suggestions for possible book reviews are welcome. Publishers interested in having their books considered for review in Antisemitism Studies should mail two copies of the book to: 

Dr. Catherine Chatterley
Editor-in-Chief, Antisemitism Studies
c/o Canadian Institute for the Study of Antisemitism
PO Box 58029 RPO Bishop Grandin
Winnipeg, Manitoba, R2M 2R6
CANADA

Any questions about the journal or its submissions process may be directed to the editor: antisemitismstudies@icloud.com

Date Posted: Tue, 05 Jul 2016

Call for Contributors - Issue 18 (Autumn 2017) -"Defining & Defending Borders in Imperial, Soviet and Post-Soviet Contexts"

 

Call for Contributors - Issue 18 (Autumn 2017) -"Defining & Defending Borders in Imperial, Soviet and Post-Soviet Contexts"

Issue Editors: Anna Colin Lebedev, Ioulia Shukan, Amandine Regamey, Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski

Borders remain today a crucial issue across the post-Soviet space in debate over both contemporary geopolitics and historical legacies, as Russia's seizure of Crimea and the war in Ukraine's East have shown.

Over the last several centuries, an inhabitant of Eastern Europe could be born in one country, grow up in another, die in a third, and yet never leave home. Shifting borders shaped not only place names, but also everyday lives and practices. Establishing, challenging, and guarding borders was inseparable from war, population exchanges, deportations, confinement, imprisonment.

New borders appeared as the collapse of the Soviet Union turned administrative borders into the national borders of new states. Some of these borders have been immediately challenged by separatist and/or nationalist movements, as in Nagorno-Karabakh, Transnistria, Abkhazia or Chechnya. Today, migration, displacement, and minorities also pose new challenges to states and societies in the expanded European Union. A number of institutions are today involved in the borders’ enforcement and management: national force ministries, international agencies, border assistance programs. The attention paid to borders in security, economic and identity policies make these peripheral territories increasingly central.

The issue will focus on borders and conflict in Imperial, Soviet and Post-Soviet contexts.

Topics of investigation could include:

Borders as object and result of power relations and international order
  • Nationalism, separatism and new states
  • State borders vs. Imperial borders vs. regional borders
  • Borders and armed conflicts
  • Cross-border violence
  • Gendered practices of border enforcements

Governing borders
  • Governmentality of territorial limits
  • Actors of border control
  • Crossing and transgressing borders
  • International cooperation and transborder policies
  • Economy of border enforcement

Borders and political communities
  • Imagined borders, remembered and forgotten borders and their effects
  • Internal borders
  • Defining citizenships, shaping citizens
  • Asylum seekers and refugees on borders
  • Schengen Area and “Fortress Europe”
  • Externalization of EU migration policy

Guidelines for submission

The journal will be published in three languages (French, English and Russian with a 100-word abstract in English), as a result of which most authors will be able to write in their native language. But we would like to draw your attention to the fact that articles in English will reach a much broader audience. The articles (30 000 to 50 000 characters) submitted to pipss.org for publication should be original contributions and should not be under consideration for any other publication. Each article will be submitted to double-anonymous peer review; final decisions on publication will be made by the Editorial Board.

If you wish to submit an article, please first contact the Chief Editor (contact@pipss.org) and send a 100-word abstract in English. For details about the guidelines for article submission please check http://pipss.revues.org/169.

The deadline for article submission is end of December 2016 with publication in Autumn 2017.

We welcome also shorter research notes (15 000 signs), interviews as well as presentation of unpublished documents. For details contact 18th issue editors contact@pipss.org.

Papers dealing with other issues related to armies and power institutions in the CIS, as well as book review proposals are also welcome.

Book Reviews

Publishers interested in publicizing their editions, please send review copies to: Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski, CERSIPS c/° CERCEC, 190-198 av. de France 75244 Paris cedex 13.
Date Posted: Tue, 05 Jul 2016

CFP: UC Undergraduate Journal of Slavic and East/Central European Studies

Undergraduate students working in any relevant discipline are invited to submit their papers for consideration to the UC Undergraduate Journal of Slavic and East/Central European Studies.  All papers will be subject to peer review. 

The deadline to submit is October 10, 2016.  While the papers will be due in a few months, right now we need a preliminary headcount.  If you are planning to submit your paper, please email Prof. Yelena Furman with your name, preferred email, the title of your paper, and the name and email of your advisor: yfurman@humnet.ucla.edu

It is expected that you will work with your advisor between now and the submission deadline on revising your paper.  Please keep in mind that there is a large difference between a conference presentation and a written article.  Your papers should have a well-formulated and well-developed thesis, with plenty of textual evidence to back it up. When citing a non-English language source, please give the quote in English translation in the body and in the original Slavic language in the footnotes. The papers should be a maximum of 25 double-spaced pages and need to include footnotes and a bibliography (the page limit is inclusive of the bibliography/footnotes).  For the bibliography, please use the Chicago Manual of Style format (you can find a hard copy of CMS in your library and it’s also available online).

If you haven’t seen it yet, please take a look at the journal:

http://web.international.ucla.edu/cwl/slavicjournal/1016

Date Posted: Tue, 21 Jun 2016

Call for Papers - Studia Slavica et Balcanica Petropolitana

The editors of “Studia Slavica et Balcanica Petropolitana” would like to invite you to take part in the project “Philias and phobias in the history of the Slavic world”.

In today's humanities, history of emotions is known to be an influential trend of increasing popularity. It focuses on people’s emotions in which it sees a source of  motivation for their actions in historical perspective. For the Slavic nations, whose political activity for a long time was far from being explicitly articulated because of their dependent status within different European empires, emotions were driving social forces, and it was them that formed socio-cultural values and determined historical choice of both individuals and societies in a given historical situation. The journal “Studia Slavica et Balcanica Petropolitana” (http://slavica-petropolitana.spbu.ru/en/) is planning to publish a collection of papers devoted to such emotional aspects of Slavic history. The focus would be on social and cultural philias and phobias that existed within the Slavic world, on what the Slavs were afraid of, and on what they are fond of. Within the subjects a broad and unexpected statement of a question would be possible, including attempts of defining political, social and cultural fears/preferences, as well as case studies from the field of ethnography and historical psychology.

The project is planned for the the next number of the journal that is to be published in 2016. Please send your preliminary applications or suggestions to a.filushkin@spbu.ru (Alexander Filyushkin, Editor-in-Chief), or to aljimov@mail.ru (Denis Alimov, Secretary of the Editorial Board) so that the editors may coordinate the scope of subjects with authors.

Articles should be no longer than 6,000 words, or 40,000 characters. Please do not forget to supply your paper with a summary in English (if your paper is written in English, the summary will be translated into Russian), a list of key words of your article, and a list of bibliography. The detailed instruction is available here: http://slavica-petropolitana.spbu.ru/en/to-the-authors.html

The editors of “Studia Slavica et Balcanica Petropolitana” would like to receive your contributions by September 30, 2016.

You may also send any questions concerning the project to the same e-mail addresses.

Date Posted: Tue, 14 Jun 2016

Conferences & Workshops

2017 Jack and Anita Hess Seminar for Faculty: Gender and Sexuality in the Holocaust

UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies


2017 Jack and Anita Hess Seminar for Faculty: 
Gender and Sexuality in the Holocaust

January 9-13, 2017

The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum announces the 2017 Jack and Anita Hess Seminar for college and university faculty from all disciplines who are teaching or preparing to teach Holocaust or Holocaust-related courses (such as comparative genocide, victims studies, etc.).

This year’s Seminar will focus on gender and sexuality in order to strengthen and expand the participants’ knowledge of how social understandings of gender norms and human sexuality affected the lives of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Holocaust. Using a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, the participants will examine where men’s and women’s Holocaust experiences mirrored one another and where they differed, as well as the ways in which the Nazi system redefined—and in some cases shattered—traditional gender roles. Over the course of this seminar, participants will explore how Nazi gender norms and perceptions of sexuality influenced the persecution experiences of Jews who came under German control. They will also examine how National Socialist thinking shaped the ideologies of sexuality, race, and gender that justified the violent exclusion of other, “non-Aryan” groups from the idealized German national body. The themes covered will include, but are not limited to: prewar persecution and women’s vulnerability; sexual violence; and the emasculation of “non-Aryan, untermenschen; forced sterilization; eugenics; instrumental sex; rape; reproductive experimentation; sex work and sex slavery in the military and concentration camps; the linkages between sexuality and race in Nazi ideology; the legislation of human desire; understandings of homosexuality; representations of masculinity and femininity in Nazi rhetoric; voyeurism and public shaming; the tension between passionate camaraderie, homoeroticism, and homosexuality in the numerous all-male institutions in Nazi Germany.”

This Seminar is designed for faculty of all academic disciplines. While the Seminar will focus on the specific case of the Holocaust, the themes, approaches, and methods that the seminar covers are more broadly applicable for educators who engage the perspectives of victims and survivors in other geographic regions or periods of time, as well as those working in LGBTQ studies, women’s history, gender studies, etc. 

The Seminar will be held at the United States Holocaust Museum from January 9–13, 2015. It will be co-led by Dagmar Herzog, Distinguished Professor of History and the Daniel Rose Faculty scholar at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York, and Annette Timm, Associate Professor of History at the University of Calgary. Dr. Herzog’s scholarship has examined the role of sexuality in Europe and America and its relation to politics, especially under fascism and in its wake. She has also published widely on gender, theology, and women’s rights. Dr. Herzog is currently analyzing points where psychoanalysis and the social sciences meet. She has written a number of works, including, Cold War Freud: Psychoanalysis in an Age of Catastrophes (2016); Sexuality in Europe: A Twentieth- Century History (2011); Sex in Crisis: The New Sexual Revolution and the Future of American Politics (2008); and Sex after Fascism: Memory and Morality in Twentieth-Century Germany (2005).  She has also edited the collections, Brutality and Desire: War and Sexuality in Europe’s Twentieth Century (2009); and Sexuality and German Fascism (2004). Dr. Timm has written and lectured widely about sexuality, population policy, gender, marriage counseling, and sexual duty. Her published works include, The Politics of Fertility in Twentieth-Century Berlin (2010) and Gender, Sex, and the Shaping of Modern Europe: A History from the French Revolution to the Present Day, co-authored with Joshua Sanborn (2007 & 2016). Dr. Timm’s chapter, “Mothers, Whores or Sometimes Dupes? Emotion and Race in Historiographical Debates about Women in the Third Reich,” in Beyond the Racial State, is forthcoming. She is also one of the editors of, Holocaust History and the Readings of Ka-Tzetnik, which is under contract with Bloomsbury Press. 

Professors Herzog and Timm will share insight from their own work, lead participants in discussions, and help participants prepare syllabi for their upcoming classes. Museum staff and visiting scholars working on related subjects will also lead sessions in their areas of expertise. Participants will be introduced to the numerous resources available at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum that can easily be used in their classrooms, such as Experiencing History, the Museum’s digital humanities project; the digitized archives; photo and film archives; and the oral history collection. Participants will also have access to Museum staff and visiting fellows with whom they can consult about their classes and Holocaust-related projects. 

Candidates must be faculty members of accredited, baccalaureate-awarding institutions in North America.  Applications must include a curriculum vitae, a short statement of the candidate's specific interest in and need to attend the Seminar, and a supporting letter from a departmental chair or dean detailing the Holocaust-related courses that the candidate is teaching or planning and the support that the university is providing for Holocaust studies at the institution.  If the applicant has already taught an applicable course, a syllabus should be included.
 
Admission will be decided without regard to the age, gender, race, creed, or national origin of the candidate.  A maximum of 20 applicants will be accepted.  For non-local participants, the Mandel Center will defray the cost of (1) direct travel to and from the participant’s home institution and Washington, DC, and (2) lodging for the duration of the Seminar.  Incidentals, meals, and book expenses must be defrayed by the candidates or their respective institutions.  All participants must attend the entire Seminar.
 
Applications must be postmarked or received in electronic form no later than Tuesday, November 1, 2016 and sent to:
 
University Programs
Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW
Washington, DC 20024-2150
Fax: (202) 479-9726       Email: university_programs@ushmm.org
 
For questions, contact Dr. Kierra Crago-Schneider at 202-314-1779 or kcrago-schneider@ushmm.org.  Accepted applicants will be notified of the results of the selection process by Friday, November 18, 2016.
 
This Seminar is endowed by Edward and David Hess in memory of their parents, Jack and Anita Hess, who believed passionately in the power of education to overcome racial and religious prejudice.

Date Posted: Fri, 19 Aug 2016

CfP: "Reluctant heritage: Revisiting museums and memory sites in Central and Eastern Europe in a transnational perspective", Bucharest, CEREFREA, 4-5 November 2016 [DL: September 15th]

A troubled and segmented East-European history has given rise to a troubled and segmented museum history. Museums in Central and Eastern Europe have found themselves, time and again, faced with difficult and uncomfortable choices. Immediately after the Second World War, museums had to update their exhibitions in order to narrate radically different stories. One of the major changes also included exhibiting the socialist present, such as the accomplishments of the regime, and the recent past: the violent, revolutionary coming to power of communist parties all over Eastern Europe became part of the permanent exhibition of local and national museums. Museums also had to literally hide entire collections that were suddenly found inappropriate. After the fall of communism, these collections were brought back to museum halls (although much of their history, documentation and context had been lost) and it was time for the communist collections to become bothersome and thus be hidden or even destroyed.

The workshop seeks to explore the specificities of reaction to political and social change in the context of museums and heritage sites. Museums could be considered in terms of their historiographic and political foundations, as the outcome of mobilizations of a wide variety of actors who have contributed to their creation or their dismantling (museum professionals, architects, academics, public historians, victims’ associations and other cultural brokers). In some contexts, the heritage process has contributed to a discursive criminalisation of previous regimes – for instance the transformation of detention centres in museums or memory sites. In others, it has facilitated implicit forms of rehabilitation, under the guise of commercially exploiting the legacy – architectural, artistic, political – of the former regime. Finally, a significant number of museums and memory sites were faced with the challenge and task of reinvesting their collections with a new meaning and a new narrative, framed in new historiographies and nation-building projects.

Within this framework, our workshop will bring together contributions that respond to one or more of the following aspects, relating to the central concern on whether museum displays and heritage sites have been remade to conform to new scientific and political narratives/ agendas:

- will examine case-studies of metamorphoses of East-European museums and built heritage during the Cold War and in post-communism. 
- will discuss whether museums are sometimes in the vanguard of social and political change or are they merely reacting to societal transformations.
- will analyse how museums and heritage sites have been mobilized to qualify, and at times to criminalize the socialist period
- will seek to highlight the emergence and circulation of heritage models at national, regional and trans-regional levels, evident in the museums established in former detention centres, in the management of heritage assets related to past dictatorial regimes, and in the reconfigurations of exhibitions in museums around the area. 
- will expand the debate by bringing case-studies of transnational processes going beyond the European borders (with a particular interest in Latin America)
- will bring theoretical and methodological insights into the study of processes of heritage-making from a transnational perspective.

Please submit 300-word abstracts and a short bio (in English or in French) to reluctantheritage@gmail.com by September 15th. The successful participants will be notified by September 20th. 

While the conference will be bilingual, in English and French, no simultaneous translation will be provided. 

Funds are available to cover the expenses (travel or accommodation) for a limited number of participants. Please indicate in your paper proposal whether you will be seeking this funding.

Convenors:
Gruia Bădescu, University of Oxford
Simina Bădică, National Museum of the Romanian Peasant
Nelly Bekus, University of Exeter
Damiana Oțoiu, University of Bucharest

The workshop is organized by the Regional Center for Advanced Francophone Research in Social Sciences (CEREFREA Villa Noël), University of Bucharest and supported by the following institutions and projects: 
- Museums and Controversial Collections. Politics and Policies of Heritage-Making in Post-Colonial and Post-socialist Contexts project of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research and Innovation, CNCS – UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-2368, New Europe College, Bucharest.
- AHRC (Care for the Future) - LABEX Pasts in the Present joint funded project The Criminalization of Dictatorial Pasts in Europe and Latin America in Global Perspective, University of Exeter and Institut des Sciences Sociales du Politique, Paris.
- Political Science Department, University of Bucharest.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/326636824342738/

Date Posted: Fri, 19 Aug 2016

Panelists sought for the International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 3–6, 2017

Following the suggestion from a SEEMSG member, I would like to extend a CFP in order to organise Medieval Slavonic sessions for the 24th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 3–6, 2017. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Medieval Slavonic studies.
 
The thematic strand for the 2017 IMC is "Otherness." See the IMC Call for Papers (https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2017_call.html) for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.
 
Once we have received paper proposals, we will organise the papers into thematic sessions (3 papers each with an organiser and moderator) based on commonalities between paper proposals.
 
The deadline for submission is August 31, 2016. Proposals should include:
 
   - Title
   - 100-word abstract
   - Whether or not you would agree to be a session moderator
   - For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, and contact information
   - Short CV
 
It would be great for our field and for medieval studies in general to have a few Slavonic sessions at Leeds.
Date Posted: Fri, 19 Aug 2016

CESS 2016 Panelist Needed, "Armed Organizations in Eurasia"

We are seeking a third panelist for a panel at the upcoming CESS in Princeton in November 2016 on "Armed Organizations in Eurasia: Cossacks and Streltsy from 16th Century to Post-Socialist Times." The original panelist who was to present on the Streltsy in the 16th century is unable to participate. We would welcome a paper on Cossacks or Streltsy in Eurasia with either a historical or contemporary focus. The current panelists are:

Dimitri Tolkatsch, Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg, "The New 'Cossacks' in Revolutionary Ukraine"

Margarete Zimmerman, University of Jena, "Cossacks and Kazakhs: National Conflicts and Religious Solutions"

Philip Gleissner will serve as chair, and I will be the discussant. 

The panel is scheduled for Saturday, November 5, 2016 at 11:00-12:45.

If you are interested, please let me know asap: kenwors@miamioh.edu

Dr. Scott M. Kenworthy, Associate Professor 
Dept of Comparative Religion
Miami University, Oxford OH 45056

Date Posted: Thu, 11 Aug 2016

CFP: Film History - Special Issue: “Amateur Film and the Institution”

CALL FOR PAPERS
Film History - Special Issue: “Amateur Film and the Institution”
Guest Editors: Enrique Fibla, Masha Salazkina (Concordia University)
Deadline for abstracts: October 15th, 2016

In recent years, Film Studies scholarship began to pay more attention to the effects that various non-theatrical film initiatives – such as educational, industrial, and other institutional productions - have had on the way modern life is ordered, experienced and imagined. Although amateur film initiatives have sometimes been included in such debates, their relationship to professional film expressions and institutions has not yet been explored in depth. Usually deemed a mere hobby devoted to recording family gatherings and trips, amateur cinema’s rich history as a vernacular media form, with its own journals, circulation circuits, and particular relationship to actuality is yet to be fully explored. Likewise, the current amateur digital media explosion has gathered scholarly attention, but it remains to be articulated in relation to a more comprehensive history of vernacular media. Such histories can potentially allow for a new map and timeline of moving image production to emerge: countries or regions previously deemed peripheral for film history due to their lack of a strong film industry may become relevant to rethink the space that film occupies in cultural history globally.
With these ideas in mind, the Amateur Film and the Institution special issue looks to discuss the different implications of amateur cinema around the world in relation to the technological, social, cultural, and economic developments that marked its emergence in different contexts. The changing discourses on the status of amateurism vs. professional aesthetics have also shaped much of film criticism and theory, emerging with particular force at certain moments in history. A central task of the special issue will be to interrogate the relationship between amateur practices and broader film institutional developments and open a conversation by addressing a range of questions, such as: What role did amateur production play in the institutionalization of film? What kind of alternative institutions did amateurs create? How does the development of these practices and discourses impact our understanding of the history and geography of moving images?

We invite contributions from scholars and practitioners to submit paper proposal on the history of film amateur practices around the world. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

-Archival institutions and non-professional film
-Non-professional film movements, journals, and festivals
-Amateur pornography
-Political potential of amateur cinema
-Amateur filmmaking and experimental/avant-garde cinema
-Self-made productions and the contemporary digital culture
-DIY technologies and aesthetics
-Amateur film in relation to industrial and educational films
-Histories of critical debates about the status of “the amateur” in film and media
-New geographies of moving image history beyond commercial film
-The impact of the study of amateur cinema on film historiography


Send a 500-600 word abstract and a brief biographical note to enrique.fibla@concordia.ca and salazkina.masha@gmail.com by October 15th 2016. The editorial team will notify selected proposals by November 1st 2016. Completed manuscripts (up to 9,000 words) will be due February 1st 2017, and will be accepted for publication pending editorial and external readers evaluation. All submissions will be subjected to double blind peer review.
For further information on Film History journal submission guidelines see:http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/pages.php?pID=78&CDpath=4

In addition to scholarly articles, we invite submissions of relevant previously unpublished original documents on this topic, in English or in translation, to be included in the special issue.

Date Posted: Tue, 09 Aug 2016

Discussant needed for panel on "Conceptualizing Russian Art and Identity in the Cold War Era"

We are seeking a discussant for a panel on the twentieth-century conceptualist art, called "Conceptualizing Russian Art and Identity in the Cold War Era." The panel is scheduled for Thursday, Nov 17 at 5pm.

This panel is part of a panel series, 'Radical Politics, Radical Selves,' dedicated to investigating the interconnections between self-creation, collective formation and cultural production in Imperial, Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. It explores the artist communities and networks of influence, the political context of the Cold War and late Soviet cultural policy which gave rise to the phenomenon of Conceptualism. Suspicious of both state authorities and artistic authorities alike, Russian conceptual artists of the Cold War period developed a radical aesthetics whose influence is felt in contemporary art to this day. The papers in this panel consider how artists navigate between communist and capitalist modes of art production and how their quest for an alternative mode of self-fashioning resonates in contemporary culture.
 
Chair: Vera Koshkina, Harvard U
Discussant: NEEDED
Paper 1: 'Shimmering Identity: the Counter-Ideology of Moscow Conceptualism' 
Daniil Leiderman, Princeton U
Paper 2: 'The Real Deal: Yuri Albert's Impostor Aesthetics' 

Ksenya Gurshtein, Independent Scholar
Paper 3: 'Embracing the Periphery: Nonconformist Artists as Ideological Nomads' 
Clinton Buhler, Dixie State U
 
Please reply off-list to aaizman@g.harvard.edu if interested.
Date Posted: Thu, 04 Aug 2016

CfP: Transnational Relations Between Eastern Europe/Russia-USSR and the Middle East, Late 19th Century to 1991 (10-11 February 2017 at Princeton Univ.)

Transnational Relations Between Eastern Europe/Russia-USSR and the Middle East, Late 19th Century to 1991

10-11 February 2017 at Princeton University

Note: This workshop is part of a Université de Genève/Princeton University partnership grant co-organized by Sandrine Kott (UNIGE) and Cyrus Schayegh (PU).

Applications: Send a paper title, an abstract of max. 300 words, and a brief CV by 15 September 2016 to schayegh@princeton.edu.

Description: Histories of Eastern Europe [EE]/Russia – Middle East [ME] transnational relations form a relative lacuna in the scholarship on both regions; most extant work centers on Russia/USSR, and/or the Cold War, and/or state actors; and few scholars of various subfields are in conversation. Moreover, such relations are a useful laboratory to explore broad conceptual questions relevant to the study of modern transnational history.

A principal reason concerns space.

This is the case, centrally, because Eastern Europe/Russia-USSR and the Middle East are broadly speaking neighbors. To be sure, especially in the globally interconnected modern period, geographical distance is not really correlated with sociopolitical distance: witness the Cuban-Soviet alliance from 1960. Still, proximity mattered in some ways and some fields. (Two very specific examples were environmental concerns and early Soviet policy towards European colonies and communist parties in the 1920s-50s.)

That neighborly issue matters doubly because crucial pre-World War I imperial realities complicate it in fascinating ways. We may ask: (How) did the fact that both bits of Eastern Europe and of the Middle East were Ottoman matter even after the late 19th century / after 1918? What about the modern echoes and effects of long-standing Russian interest in ‘the Middle East’ (think as far back as 10th-century Russophone Scandinavian visits to Constantinople, and more famously of Moscow as ‘the Third Rome’ after Constantinople’s fall)? Do twentieth-century transnational ties take on (a) particular form(s) and meaning(s) in such historically deeply grounded ‘neighborly’ realities?

Related, could parallel, linked, or overlapping EE-ME trajectories allow new interpretations of modern developments that touched both (bits of) EE and of the ME? Think, for example, of the non-aligned movement of the 1950s/60s – could one see its EE and ME members as (re)-creating a Eastern Mediterranean space?

Lastly, and to add one more layer: (how) does it matter that in some sense both the terms ‘Eastern Europe’ and ‘the Middle East’ – though not their complex reality tout court – were constructed relative to one and the same third region, (Western) Europe? Could one see them, jointly, as double – or even linked up – periphery? What would such a view mean, both from the linked ME/EE and from Western European perspectives? What is certain is that for the latter, the two were and continue to be both close and – only seemingly a paradox – an ‘other:’ Eastern Europe/Russia and the Middle East were two of the “three borders … identified” during Europe’s cultural construction (Bo Stråth, “Insiders and Outsiders,” in Stefan Berger, Companion to 19th-Century Europe, 4]).

We are interested in applications that have a firm empirical grounding and make a clear conceptual contribution, taking into questions of space such as those outlined above. Historians, as well as other scholars in the humanities, are encouraged to apply.

Date Posted: Tue, 05 Jul 2016

CFP: AATSEEL-Wisconsin Conference 2016

CFP
AATSEEL-Wisconsin Conference
October 7-8, 2016
University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Abstracts for 20-minute papers on any aspect of Slavic literatures, cultures (including film, music, and the visual arts), linguistics, and history are invited for the annual conference of the Wisconsin chapter of AATSEEL (The American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages). Comparative topics and interdisciplinary approaches are welcome and encouraged. The conference will be held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Friday and Saturday, October 7 and 8, 2016. 

Recent conference programs are available on the AATSEEL-WI website at http://slavic.lss.wisc.edu/new_web/?q=node/7

This year's keynote lecture will be delivered by Professor Olga Maiorova (University of Michigan).

To present a paper at the AATSEEL-WI conference, please submit a proposal by August 31, 2016.

A complete proposal consists of: 
1. Author's contact information (name, affiliation, postal address, telephone, and email).
2. Paper title
3. 300-500 word abstract
4. Equipment request (if necessary) 

Please send proposals by email to: Melissa Warner, mmwarner@wisc.edu 

Please include “AATSEEL-WI” in the subject line of your email. All submissions will be acknowledged and considered, and all applicants will be informed of the status of their proposals no later than September 15.

Date Posted: Thu, 30 Jun 2016

Call for Papers: Central Slavic Conference 2016

Call for Papers

October 21-23, 2016

St. Louis, Missouri

The Central Slavic Conference is pleased to invite scholars of all disciplines working in Slavic, Eurasian, and East European studies to submit proposals for panels, individual papers, and roundtables at its annual meeting to be held in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, October 21-23, 2016.

Founded in 1962 as the Bi-State Slavic Conference, the Central Slavic Conference now encompasses seven states and is the oldest of the regional affiliates of ASEEES (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies).  Scholars from outside the region and from around the world are welcome.

Proposals for papers, panels, and roundtables should be submitted by email to CSC President Dr. David Borgmeyer at CentralSlavic@outlook.com no later than September 1, 2016.  Early proposals are encouraged.  All proposals should include:

  • Participant name, affiliation, and email contact information;
  • For individual paper / poster presentation: title and brief description (limit 50 words);
  • For panels: panel title + above information for each participant and discussant (if applicable);
  • For roundtables: roundtable title and participant information.

For the first time ever, the CSC will dedicate a separate portion of the conference to undergraduate research presentations.  Faculty are encouraged to support conference proposals from undergraduate students for this new section of the conference.   Limited funding is available to provide graduate and undergraduate students with travel stipends. 

Charles Timberlake Memorial Symposium

Now a regular part of the CSC program, the symposium is dedicated to the memory and scholarly interests of longtime CSC member Charles Timberlake. Those interested in participating should contact symposium coordinator Dr. Nicole Monnier at CentralSlavic@outlook.com.

Timberlake Memorial Graduate Paper Prize

Students who present at the CSC Annual Meeting are invited to participate in the Charles Timberlake Graduate Paper Prize competition.  Dedicated to the memory of Professor Timberlake as a teacher and mentor, the prize carries a cash award.

 

CSC registration and hotel reservation information will be available on the CSC website: http://www.slu.edu/international-studies-program/central-slavic-conference.  

Date Posted: Mon, 13 Jun 2016

Summer/ language Opportunities

Eastern Europe Awaits You! - Study Abroad Programs at the 650-year-old University of Pécs in Hungary

The University of Pécs, which is the oldest and one of the largest research universities in Hungary, has launched 21 new study abroad programs for U.S. students. We would love to welcome your students to these high quality Study Abroad programs to experience and enjoy all the cultural and educational benefits Eastern Europe can offer.

The University of Pécs has joined the IIE Generation Study Abroad program with the aim of providing U.S. students with an ideal Study Abroad destination offering a high quality education and other services.

We offer semester long programs taught in English in the following areas:

Psychology, International Relations, Business Administration, Applied Management, Architecture, Civil Engineering, Structural Engineering, Computer Science, English and American Studies, Nursing, Physiotherapy, Art History, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramic Design, Graphic Design and Music.

Further information about these programs can be found at: http://international.pte.hu/study-abroad-programmes

Students are not required to be able to speak Hungarian in order to participate in the Study Abroad programs. However, if they would like to, there is a possibility to take a Hungarian Language and Culture course designed for international students on 5 different levels.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Gyöngyi Pozsgai, PhD

International Relations Co-ordinator

Centre for International Relations

University of Pécs

Vasvári Pál u. 4.

7622 Pécs

pozsgai.gyongyi@pte.hu

Date Posted: Thu, 18 Aug 2016