Opportunities

Section 1

Content

Jobs

Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of Russian

Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of Russian
 
Lewis & Clark College – Portland, Oregon, United States
 
Lewis & Clark, a private liberal arts college with 2,000 undergraduates, invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professorship in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures beginning in fall 2017. Preferred teaching and research fields include Russian literature or linguistics; open to any period or specialization. Lewis & Clark College is an equal opportunity employer.
 
Ph.D. is required at the time of appointment as a tenure-track member of the faculty. Native or near-native fluency in both Russian and English. Potential for excellent teaching and research, as well as ability to run successful Russian program at an undergraduate institution, are essential. Usual load is five courses per academic year and may include regular participation in the College’s general education program.
 
All materials should be addressed to Freddy Vilches, Chair Russian Search Committee, and must be submitted via Interfolio https://apply.interfolio.com/37633. Click “sign up” to create your free account. More details can be found on Interfolio.
 
Review of applications will begin on November 4 and continue until the position is filled. Lewis & Clark College will conduct background checks on the finalist. -- Use your web browser to search the archives, control your subscription options, and more.

 

Date Posted: Thu, 22 Sep 2016

Tenure-Track Position in Russian Studies, University of Colorado-Boulder

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Colorado Boulder invites applications for a tenure-track position of Assistant professor in Russian Studies, to begin August 2017. Primary specialization in 19th c. Russian literature and culture; preferred secondary specialization in Russian Cinema. The successful candidate will contribute to the interdisciplinary major and MA Program in Russian Studies. Applicants must have a PhD in Russian or a related field, native or near-native command of Russian and English, and a demonstrated commitment to teaching and research. Advanced ABD will be considered; degree must be completed by August 2017.

A letter of application, cv, writing sample, sample syllabi, and names and e-mail addresses of three professional references must be submitted electronically at CU Careers, https://cu.taleo.net/careersection/2/jobdetail.ftl?job=06789&lang=en, posting 06789.

Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2016.  Preliminary interviews will be held by Skype.

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures houses programs in German, Russian, and Nordic Studies. The Russian program currently offers a BA (major and minor), MA and a concurrent BA/MA in Russian Studies. For more information about our department, please visit our web site (http://www.colorado.edu/gsll).

The University of Colorado is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to building a diverse workforce. We encourage applications from women, racial and ethnic minorities, individuals with disabilities and veterans. Alternative formats of this ad can be provided upon request for individuals with disabilities by contacting the ADA Coordinator at: hr-ada@colorado.edu.

Date Posted: Thu, 15 Sep 2016

Seeking Academic Program Specialist, CREES & CPPS, University of Michigan

Academic Program Specialist

Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
Copernicus Program in Polish Studies
University of Michigan

The Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (CREES)
<http://www.ii.umich.edu/crees> and Copernicus Program in Polish Studies
(CPPS) <http://www.ii.umich.edu/cpps> are seeking an Academic Program
Specialist to administer these renowned programs at the University of
Michigan. Applications will be accepted until September 20, 2016.

For more about CREES and CPPS, please visit their respective websites.
Inquiries about the position can be directed to Weiser Center for Europe
and Eurasia Program Manager Marysia Ostafin (mostafin@umich.edu).

How to Apply

A cover letter is required for consideration for this position and should be attached as the first page of your resume. The cover letter should address your specific interest in the position and outline skills and experience that directly relate to this position.

Responsibilities*

Programming: Develop, promote, plan, and work with other staff to implement CREES and CPPS disciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and cross-regional programs and manage project budgets. Working with the WCEE director, CREES Executive Committee, and CPPS Steering Committee, organize lectures, conferences, symposia, and films, and oversee staff providing logistical and technical support (e.g., room scheduling, media equipment, A-V recording, etc.). Provide visitor services (travel, visa, honoraria, per diem payments, hosting arrangements, itineraries). Develop and review project budgets and initiate and track financial transactions for CREES and CPPS programs. Coordinate CREES and CPPS faculty committees and communications with faculty. Organize and participate in staff meetings and cross-center planning. (40%)

Prepare and edit copy for reports, publications, websites, and other publicity for CREES and CPPS activities. Develop and oversee maintenance of specialized CREES and CPPS e-mail groups. Advertise events and academic programs through e-mail communication, print publications, and social media. Manage the CREES and CPPS Facebook and Twitter accounts and CREES announcement blog. (30%)

Provide staff support to the WCEE associate director to implement CREES undergraduate and graduate academic programs and student funding opportunities in partnership with II Undergraduate Academic Services and Fellowships and Graduate Academic Services. (15%)

Grant Management: Assist the WCEE director with proposals to external and U-M funding sources, including coordination of data collection and drafting of budgets, narratives, and reports, as needed. Administer CREES/CPPS grants, review and oversee of budgets, and coordinate other post-award activities to assure compliance with sponsor reporting and budget requirements and timetables. (10%)

Development: Work with the WCEE director and LSA DMC to explore potential gift opportunities. Oversee alumni relations, correspondence, and alumni database updates. Prepare alumni and other funding requests; plan development events as needed. (5%)

Required Qualifications*

Bachelor's degree in a relevant international or area studies field or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Familiarity with academic program administration; excellent communication and English language skills; ability to handle a variety of tasks and meet deadlines; ability to work occasional evenings and weekends; knowledge of Microsoft Office.

Desired Qualifications*

A Master’s degree in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies or related field, or an equivalent combination of education and experience; proficiency in at least one language of the region (former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe); two years University of Michigan experience with knowledge of University policies, rules, and administrative procedures (or equivalent).

Background Screening

The University of Michigan conducts background checks on all job candidates upon acceptance of a contingent offer and may use a third party administrator to conduct background checks. Background checks will be performed in compliance with the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

Mission Statement

The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence in creating, communicating, preserving and applying knowledge, art, and academic values, and in developing leaders and citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future. The University of Michigan is committed to foster learning, creativity and productivity, and to support the vigorous exchange of ideas and information, not only in the classroom but in the workplace by: -Creating a work environment in which people treat each other with respect and dignity, regardless of roles, responsibilities or differences. -Providing support, direction and resources enabling us to accomplish the responsibilities of our jobs and to reach the goals that are set for professional and personal growth.

Application Deadline

Job openings are posted for a minimum of seven calendar days. This job may be removed from posting boards and filled anytime after the minimum posting period has ended.

U-M EEO/AA Statement

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

Date Posted: Thu, 08 Sep 2016

Assistant Professor, International Relations

The Political Science Department at the University at Albany, SUNY is seeking a tenure-track colleague with a specialty in International Relations at the rank of Assistant Professor.  For the position, we have a strong preference for candidates with expertise in international security and conflict, foreign policy, international political economy, and/or global governance.

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

Assistant Professor, Russian Language, Literature, and Culture

The Department of Russian at Bryn Mawr College invites applications for a full-time, beginning tenure track Assistant Professor position in Russian language, literature, and culture, with a specialization in nineteenth-century Russian literature to start August 1, 2017. Candidates must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. by the start date, should demonstrate expertise in teaching Russian at all levels, and should be able to contribute significantly to the Department’s Russian Flagship Program. Candidates must possess native or near-native command of both Russian and English.

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

Assistant Professor, Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

The Program in Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies at Smith College invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor, to begin July 1, 2017. We seek a broadly trained, energetic scholar of modern and contemporary Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian cultures with a commitment to interdisciplinary teaching and research. The fields of specialization are open. The successful candidate will teach four courses a year, including a survey of Russian literature and courses in her/his areas of interest. The ability to teach advanced Russian on an as-needed basis is expected; knowledge of a second Slavic or regional language is highly desirable. The successful candidate will join Smith’s REEES faculty in active program building, complementing our existing strengths in Russian history, religion, and Jewish studies. Candidates with interests in film and media studies, digital humanities efforts, visual studies, cultural studies, or environmental studies are especially encouraged to apply. A demonstrated commitment to undergraduate teaching is expected. A Ph.D. in relevant field is required at time of appointment.

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

Coordinator Sister School Partnerships

The Coordinator of Sister School Partnerships provides leadership, organizational focus and administration for the University of the Incarnate Word’s (UIW) global and internationalization initiatives and activities. This role manages the University’s existing international academic partners (Sister Schools), while continuously assessing potential collaboration with new institutions aimed at increasing access to high quality study abroad or international academic programs for the UIWcommunity. This role may supervise their student employees and volunteers. This role ensures compliance with all associated policies, rules and regulations.

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

European Study Center Liaison

The European Study Center Liaison’s primary role is to serve as the main recruiter for the University of the Incarnate Word’s (UIW) European Study Center (ESC), located in Heidelberg, Germany. The secondary role of the Liaison is to serve as the conduit between UIW and the ESC academic and administrative team, facilitating the alignment of strategies, objectives, active communication, and future initiatives. This role is based out of UIW’s main campus located in San Antonio, Texas. This role reports to the UIW Director of Sister School Partnerships and supervises the European Study Center Assistant. This role ensures compliance with all associated policies, rules and regulations.

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

Executive Director

JumpStart is not your normal NGO.
 
Founded in Tbilisi, Georgia in 2009, JumpStart creates tools, visualizes news, and shares stories to shed light on issues of social importance to a wide audience. We research topics by analyzing data and translating it into engaging content that informs people about critical issues. In the last year, we’ve run communications campaigns on topics such as road safety, elections, healthy eating, and gender issues.

We are looking for an Executive Director who will build on JumpStart’s impressive track record of work. Our desired candidate will lead JumpStart into the future by overseeing and improving its communications, fundraising, and operations according to its mission. We work hard, but we also prioritize fun, creativity, and collaboration. We expect our next Executive Director to also embody these values.

 

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

Human Rights Advisor

American Systems is seeking Human Rights Advisors for a critical Department of State program supporting the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).
Human rights work typically involves monitoring, investigating and reporting on the human rights situation, analyzing relevant laws and practices, intervening with national authorities to address human rights violations and ensure compliance with relevant human rights standards and national laws. It may also involve monitoring the judicial system as a whole, including trials, as well as situations involving minorities, refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs) and freedom of movement issues. In addition, human rights work can involve promoting public awareness of human rights, human rights education, addressing gender equality, Roma and Sinti tolerance, non-discrimination, and trafficking in person issues.

 

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

Internships

David F. Prindable Undergraduate Internship, IPRH

David F. Prindable Undergraduate Internship at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH): Communications and Undergraduate Outreach

Undergraduate majors in humanities disciplines are invited to apply for a paid internship in communications and undergraduate outreach at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH), the campus humanities hub. The successful candidate will assist IPRH with its communications strategy, particularly its email communications and social-media presence, in addition to serving as a IPRH’s undergraduate liaison and chief strategist on undergraduate engagement. This position is funded thanks to a generous gift from David F. Prindable.

To be considered for this internship, candidates must possess strong writing and communications skills, excellent attention to detail, the ability to work independently, and an investigative mind. A broad interest in the humanities is preferred.

The position commences October 17, 2016 and ends May 12, 2017. The Prindable intern will work approximately two to three hours per week, for 24 weeks, at the rate of $15.75 per hour (up to $1,000 per year). There is flexibility regarding the hours to be worked.

To apply, please email a one-page letter of interest, a resume, and a list of three references (academic or non-academic, so long as they can speak to your skills and work ethic; at least one referee should be able to comment on your writing skills) to iprh@illinois.edu by 5:00 p.m. on September 30 with “Prindable Internship” in the subject line. Letters may be addressed and questions directed to IPRH Associate Director, Nancy Castro (ncastro@illinois.edu).

Date Posted: Tue, 13 Sep 2016

U.S. Department of State Student Internship Program Summer 2017

Announcing the U.S. Department of State 2017 Summer Student Unpaid Internship. The program offers U.S. citizen undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to participate in unpaid internships that provide professional experience and personal growth and learning within a foreign affairs environment.

The U.S. Department of State Student Internship is an unpaid, intensive internship offering U.S. citizen undergraduate and graduate students a chance to participate in the formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy, working closely with representatives of the U.S. Department of State’s Foreign and Civil Services. The program is both professionally and academically beneficial, providing participants with hands-on experience and insight into the substance and daily operations of U.S. foreign policy.

 

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

Funding

The American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT) Fellowship Opportunity

 
The American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT) is pleased to announce 2017-2018 fellowship programs for U.S.-based students and scholars: 
ARIT / National Endowment for the Humanities Advanced Fellowships for Research in Turkey cover all fields of the humanities, including prehistory, history, art, archaeology, literature, and linguistics as well as interdisciplinary aspects of cultural history for applicants who have completed their academic training.  The fellowships may be held for terms ranging from four months to a full year.  Stipend per month is $4,200.
ARIT Fellowships for Research in Turkey are offered for research in ancient, medieval, or modern times, in any field of the humanities and social sciences.  Post-doctoral and advanced doctoral fellowships may be held for various terms, for terms from one month up to one academic year.  Stipends range from $2,500 to $15,500.
Applications for ARIT fellowships must be submitted to ARIT by November 1, 2016.  The fellowship committee will notify applicants by late January, 2017.
ARIT Summer Fellowships for Intensive Advanced Turkish Language at Bogazici University, Istanbul, summer 2017.  The program supports intensive study of advanced Turkish language at Bogazici University in Istanbul, Turkey, including air fare, tuition, and stipend.  The application deadline is February 5.  [Pending funding
For further information please see the ARIT webpage at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/ARIT/FellowshipPrograms.html
Date Posted: Thu, 22 Sep 2016

Call for Applications: Wayne Vucinich Visiting Scholar Fellowship

Call for Applications:  Wayne Vucinich Visiting Scholar Fellowship 
 
The Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies at Stanford University invites applications for the Wayne Vucinich Visiting Scholar Fellowship.
 
This is a twelve-week residential fellowship to be offered in Winter 2017. The fellowship is open to scholars working on the region in any discipline. Preference will be given to scholars who have completed the PhD (or equivalent) in the past five years and who are residents of countries that fall under the direct purview of the Center: Russia, East Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia (including Afghanistan).
 
The fellowship award funds international travel, health insurance, and visa support, in addition to a $10,000 stipend for living expenses. The fellow will have access to university libraries and archives and will have use of a shared work space at the Center. He or she will be expected to be in residence throughout the fellowship period (January-March 2017) and to participate actively in the scholarly activities of the Center. 

Please submit an application form (including a letter of application, a Curriculum Vitae, a writing sample, two letters of recommendation, and a short proposal for a public lecture and/or workshop by 5pm PST on October 14, 2016. For more information about the Center, please consult our website, http://creees.stanford.edu/.
 
Vucinich Fellowship application form: http://web.stanford.edu/dept/CREES/VucinichFellowship2017.fb
 
Date Posted: Mon, 12 Sep 2016

Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control: Strengthening Capacity of HIV/AIDS Treatment in Ukraine under the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)

Due Date: Oct 10, 2016  Electronically submitted applications must be submitted no later than 11:59 p.m., ET, on the listed application due date.

Grantee will work at Ukrainian priority regional AIDS Centers and antiretroviral (ARV) treatment sites to provide technical assistance on implementation of test and treat guidelines and on innovative service delivery models for resource optimization. Grantee will also work at national level to provide input into development of national guidelines and policy on HIV testing, care and treatment.

Award Ceiling: $1,600,000

Eligible Applicants: Unrestricted

More information at www.grants.gov

Date Posted: Thu, 08 Sep 2016

Bard Graduate Center Research Fellowship

Bard Graduate Center invites scholars from university, museum, and independent backgrounds with a PhD or equivalent professional experience to apply for funded research fellowships, to be held during the 2017–18 academic year. The theme for this period is "What is distance?" Applicants are asked to address in a cover letter how their projected work will bear on this question. The fellowships are intended to fund collections-based research at Bard Graduate Center or elsewhere in New York, as well as writing or reading projects in which being part of our dynamic research environment is intellectually valuable. Eligible disciplines and fields of study include—but are not limited to—art history, architecture and design history, economic and cultural history, history of technology, philosophy, anthropology, and archaeology.
 
The stipend rate is $3,500 per month, and housing is available. Both long- and short-term fellowships are available (1–6 months). The timing of dates will be negotiated with individual awardees. Fellows will be given a workspace in our Research Center at 38 West 86th Street, between Columbus Avenue and Central Park West, in New York City.
 
Bard Graduate Center is a graduate research institute devoted to the study of the decorative arts, design history, and material culture, drawing on methodologies and approaches from art history, economic and cultural history, history of technology, philosophy, anthropology, and archaeology. It offers MA and PhD degrees, possesses a specialized library of 60,000 volumes exclusive of serials, and publishes the journals West 86th: A Journal of Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture and Source: Notes in the History of Art, the book series Cultural Histories of the Material World (all with the University of Chicago Press), and the catalogues that accompany the exhibitions it presents every year in its gallery (with Yale University Press). Over 50 research seminars, lectures, and symposia are scheduled annually and are live-streamed around the world on Bard Graduate Center’s YouTube channel. 
 
To apply, please submit the following materials electronically via email to fellowships@bgc.bard.edu in a single PDF file: (1) cover letter explaining why Bard Graduate Center is an appropriate research affiliation and how your work bears on the question “What is distance?” Please also indicate your preferred length and dates of the fellowship; (2) 150-word abstract of project; (3) detailed project description; (4) CV; (5) publication or academic writing sample of approximately 20–30 pages. In addition, please arrange for two letters of reference to be submitted either via email (fellowships@bgc.bard.edu) or post (to Bard Graduate Center, Research Fellowship Committee, 38 West 86th Street, New York, NY, 10024). All materials must be received by November 1, 2016. Incomplete or late applications will not be considered.
 
We do not reimburse fellows for travel, relocation, or visa-related costs in connection with this fellowship award. Also, please note that the fellowship stipend and the value of the provided housing may be subject to taxes for both US citizens and non-US citizens in accordance with US tax code.
 
Fellowships are awarded without regard to race, color, gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, age, or disability. Please direct questions to the Research Fellowship Committee via email (fellowships@bgc.bard.edu) and see our Frequently Asked Questions page. 

Date Posted: Tue, 06 Sep 2016

Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship

The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship provides full-time six to nine month fellowships for recent college and graduate school alumni to work on international peace and security issues with one of more than two dozen participating public-interest organizations in Washington, DC. Scoville Fellows have the opportunity to work with senior-level staff and to conduct research, write articles and reports, organize talks and conferences sponsored by their host organization, and do public education and advocacy on a range of issues including arms control and nonproliferation, conflict prevention and resolution, conventional arms trade, environmental and energy security, defense budget, and peacekeeping. They may also attend coalition meetings, Congressional hearings, and policy briefings, as well as meetings with policy experts arranged by the program. Many former Scoville Fellows have gone on to pursue graduate degrees in international relations and related fields and taken prominent positions in the field of peace and security with public-interest organizations, the Federal Government, academia, and media.

Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

U.S. Department of State Title VIII Research Fellowships in Russia, Eurasia, and Eastern Europe

Attention U.S. scholars and graduate students:
 
American Councils for International Education is currently accepting applications for the next cycle of U.S. Department of State Title VIII Research Fellowships in Russia, Eurasia, and Eastern Europe. Fellowships are offered in two categories:
 
v  Title VIII Research Scholar Program:
Provides full support for research in policy-relevant fields in Russia, Eurasia, and Eastern Europe. Fellowships include round-trip international travel; housing and living stipends; visa support; overseas health, accident, and evacuation insurance; archive access; and logistical support. Open to U.S. graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, and faculty.
 
v  Title VIII Combined Research and Language Training Program:
Provides full support for research and individualized language instruction in Russia, Eurasia, and Eastern Europe. Fellowships include round-trip international travel; housing and living stipends; visa support; overseas health, accident, and evacuation insurance; archive access; logistical support; and up to 10 academic hours per week of language instruction. Open to U.S. graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, and faculty.
APPLICATION & QUESTIONS
 
Please note that all American Councils Title VIII Fellowship Programs must take place between January 15, 2017 and September 15, 2017. Individuals interested in applying should check the program website for more information and access to the online application. The application deadline for the Title VIII fellowships is October 1, 2016. All application materials must be submitted by the application deadline.
 
Please direct any questions regarding the application process to the Title VIII Research Program Officer at American Councils for International Education (phone: 202-833-7522; email:outbound@americancouncils.org).
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
Funding for these programs is available through American Councils from the U.S. Department of State’s Program for Research and Training on Eastern Europe and the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (Title VIII). All competitions for funding are open and merit based. In order to receive Title VIII funding, applicants must be U.S. citizens. All applications will receive consideration without regard to any factor such as race, color, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, national origin, marital status, family responsibilities, veteran status, political affiliation, or disability.
Date Posted: Fri, 02 Sep 2016

Harriman Institute Russian Politics Postdoctoral Fellowship 2016-17

2016-2017 RUSSIAN POLITICS POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP


The Harriman Institute of Columbia University invites applications for a Russian Politics postdoctoral fellowship. This fellowship begins October 1, 2016, and is for the academic year 2016-17 (with a possible renewal for academic year 2017-18) and is open to scholars conducting research in Russian politics. The fellowship comes with a salary of $50,000/year (with benefits). This postdoctoral fellowship is provisional and contingent upon Harriman’s receipt of a grant.

Requirements

The Russian Politics Postdoctoral Fellow’s responsibilities would include conducting his/her own research and developing and coordinating a seminar on policy debates about Russia (AY 2016-2017 and with potential renewal in AY 2017-2018) with Professors Timothy Frye, Kimberly Marten and Alexander Cooley. Each Fellow is required to be in residence in the New York City area.

Eligibility

We encourage applications from Social Science disciplines. The applicant’s research must focus on Russian politics.

Fellowships are open to young scholars who received the Ph.D. in a relevant discipline between July 31, 2013 and August 31, 2016 and do not hold a tenure-track position.

Recipients must have completed all their Ph.D. requirements (completed and deposited the dissertation) by August 31, 2016.

Application Process


The following list of materials is required for all applicants:

  • Curriculum Vitae.
  • Research proposal: 2-3 page statement describing the research project you would pursue at Columbia University if awarded a fellowship, indicating its relation (if any) to your doctoral dissertation, as well as its relation to the mission of the Harriman Institute.
  • A writing sample, such as an article or dissertation chapter.
  • Letters of recommendation: 2 letters of reference that include an evaluation of your research.
  • Previous Education: Indicate on your curriculum vitae each college and university you have attended, with the inclusive dates.

All application materials (including letters of reference) must be received by the Institute on or before September 15, 2016. Candidates may be invited for a phone interview. All evaluations made in connection with applications received are confidential.

Awards will be announced no later than September 23, 2016.

Please send completed application materials by email in a single PDF file to Alla Rachkov ar2052@columbia.edu. Letters of recommendation should be sent separately by the referees to Alla Rachkov ar2052@columbia.edu by that deadline. For questions, please contact Alla Rachkov at 212-854-9713.

For more information, please see http://harriman.columbia.edu/

Date Posted: Tue, 23 Aug 2016

SOYUZ Article Prize

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies announces the opening of its first *Article Prize competition* for the best article related to the culture, history, politics of postsocialism by a junior scholar. This prize recognizes significant contributions to the advancement of scholarly understandings of postsocialism, broadly defined.  Articles published in 2015 and 2016 by a scholar who has earned a PhD within the past six years (2010 or later) are eligible. Scholars from any discipline with any geographic area of interest are encouraged to apply. Submissions should be sent electronically to Jennifer Carroll at
jennifer_carroll@brown.edu no later than *September 1*. /Please include "Soyuz Article Prize" in the subject line. 

Date Posted: Mon, 15 Aug 2016

Submissions

CFP: ARIPD Journal Submissions

Call for Papers

Submission Deadline: September 30, 2016 

Date of Publication: December 31, 2016

Founded in June 2011, the American Research Institute for Policy Development (ARIPD) serves as a focal point for
academicians, professionals, graduate and undergraduate students, fellows, and associates pursuing research throughout the world. The Institute works with policymakers, scholars, and public interest groups around the world. As an independent, nonprofit research organization, ARIPD also works in affiliation with American Association of International Researchers (AAIR). Visit www.aripd.org to know more about the INSTITUTE.

The INSTITUTE publishes the research papers through a number of international journals. These journals are led by the world’s reputed professors. The quick and double blind peer review process, rich editorial board, zero tolerance for plagiarism and high respect for publication ethics, a strong commitment for scheduled publication are the key features of the Institute’s journals. The INSTITUTE calls for research papers, review papers, conceptual framework, analytical and simulation models, case studies, empirical research, technical notes, and book reviews for the coming issues of the journals. All the journals are published in both print and online.

Submission Policy
The interested contributors are highly encouraged to submit their manuscripts/papers to the executive editor as attachment at editor@aripd.org. As the INSTITUTE follows the central submission policy (same submission e-mail for every journal), the
contributors/authors are requested to indicate the name of the journal in the cover letter in which they are interested to
publish.

Deadline to submit the paper
The interested contributors are highly encouraged to submit the manuscript at any time during the year to the executive editor via e-mail at editor@aripd.org which will automatically be considered for the upcoming issue of the journal.

 

Date Posted: Thu, 22 Sep 2016

CFP Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe

We would like to invite you to submit articles to Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia, a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Post-totalitarian Studies of the Institute of Slavic Studies (University of Wroclaw, Poland) and indexed in Czasopisma Naukowe w Sieci (CNS), The Central European Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (CEJSH), and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA, ProQuest). We are seeking for essays and reviews for an issue on Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe, which will be devoted to mapping new phenomena in children’s literature and media culture that have emerged during the transition from late communism to late capitalism. As Anikó Imre argues in Globalization and the Transformation of Media Cultures in the New Europe (2009), children from Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe are post-communist subjects for whom communism is an inherited memory, whose perspectives, values and skills differ from those of older generations, and whose subjectivities are developing in the shadow of adults’ anxieties about this divide. As sources of knowledge and social capital, children’s cultural products both reflect and attempt to resolve tensions caused by the formation of new individual and collective subjectivities. Exploration of regional, European and global affiliations shaping contemporary children’s culture in post-communist Europe offers a vital contribution to a broader inquiry into processes of cultural change and their significance for the formation of national identity in post-totalitarian countries. Contributions are welcomed from a range of fields, such as popular culture, new media, games, literature, education, and childhood.

Possible areas of investigation:

-        reflective and restorative nostalgia for communist children’s entertainment vs. technoeuphoria, neoliberalism, and the celebration of transnational mobility

-        childhood heritage 

-        globalization vs. localization

-        children’s culture and Eurocentric values (e.g. the “Catching up with Europe” project, a pan-European democracy, the EuropaGO project)

-        children’s relations with interactive media, peer-to-peer technologies and participatory culture

-        edutainment vs. centralized, nationalized and literature-based education

-        children’s culture and citizenship education

-        nationalisms, ethnocentrism, homophobia, misogyny, racism, and xenophobia in children’s culture

-        relations between children’s and adult media cultures

-        children’s books markets

-        promotion of children’s literature and culture

Essay should be sent to Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (justyna.deszcz-tryhubczak@uwr.edu.pl) and Mateusz Świetlicki (mateusz.swietlicki@uwr.edu.pl) by 10th April 2017. Submissions should be 5000-6000 words. We will aim to reply to authors by 20th April 2017, with the aim of arranging reviews and completing revisions for 15th June and publication by the end of 2017. Please keep in mind that the essays must satisfy the formal requirements provided below.

Respectfully,

Guest Editors

Dr. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (Institute of English Studies, University of Wroclaw)

and Dr. Mateusz Świetlicki (Institute of Slavic Studies, University of Wroclaw)

 

 

 

GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

  • The submitted text must be accompanied by an abstract and title of the article (max. 150 words); five key words; a biographical note (affiliation; title or degree; position held; research interests; current work address and email – max. 80 words).

 

  • The name(s) and affiliation(s) of the author(s) should be listed in the upper left-hand corner of the first page:

Marianna Zacharska

Uniwersytet Jagielloński (Kraków, Polska)

  • Formatting and Style Guide:

.    a)  Standard printout: 30 lines per page; 60 characters per line (1800 characters with spaces per page); justified text; margins: top, bottom – 2,5; left – 3,5, right – 1,5

.    b)  font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.

.    c)  title of the article – centered, font – 14 point size.

.    d)  spacing: 1,5 in the main text; single spaced in the footnotes.

.    e)  titles of literary works cited in the text for the first time should be accompanied by the original title (not in transliteration) and the date of publication in parentheses; titles of literary works should be italicized (do not use quotation marks).

.    f)  quotations should be given in the original language (not in transliteration); longer quotations (more than 40 words) should be set apart from the surrounding text, in block format, indented from the left margin, and single spaced; font: 10 point size.

.    g)  names appearing in the text for the first time should be given in full.

  • FOOTNOTES should be placed at the bottom of the page on which the reference appears. Use continuous footnote numbering.
  1. a) bibliographic description in the footnotes should be given in the original language; please follow the examples:
  2. Book:
  3. Smith, History, Warsaw 2009, p. 25.

Ibidem, s. 15.

  1. Smith, History, op. cit., p. 37.
  2. Excerpts from publications of the same author:
  3. Shamone, Rap Culture, [in:] eadem, The History of Music, New York 2012, pp. 67-98.

                       Ibidem, p. 75.

  1. Shamone, Rap Culture, op. cit., p. 90.
  2. Chapter in a collective work:
  3. Blake, Feminism and Masculinity, trans. by I. Kurz,
    [in:] Gender Studies, ed. A. Johnes et al. introduction by M. Sahara, London 2008, pp. 109-117.
  4. Journal article:
  5. Noovy, Jane Austen and Romanticisms „English Studies” 2006, no. 1, pp. 32-73.
  6. Online journal article:
  7. Adams, American History, „SSHA” 14 July 2013 [http://tssha.com/Society/69385/PrintView – accessed: 20.01.20013].

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY/REFERENCE LIST:

  • Reference list or bibliography should be included at the end of the text.
  • The word bibliography should be in bold and aligned to the left. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
  • List the sources in alphabetical order by the authors' last names.
  • All sources must be justified and 1.5–spaced. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
  • Use: The Chicago Manual of Style
Date Posted: Mon, 19 Sep 2016

Call for Chapters: “The good, the bad and the ugly” Exploring boundaries between the informal, the criminal and the immoral

Call for chapters:


We are looking for 2-3 contributions to complete a volume to be published in late 2017. If interested please send an abstract to alessandra.russo@sssup.it by the 15th of October 2016.


The good, the bad and the ugly”
Exploring boundaries between the informal, the criminal and the immoral



Editors
Abel Polese (Dublin City University and Tallinn University)
Alessandra Russo (Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies)
Francesco Strazzari (Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies)



Rationale
The primary goal of this volume is to explore the complexity of informality and variety of forms informal transactions and practices may take, from the extra legal to illegal and immoral activities.
Recent empirical works have drawn attention on the range of activities happening out of the control of a state (see for example Schroeder, Chappuis and Kocak 2014; Knudsen and Frederiksen 2015). Although concepts like informality and illegality have been used to define them, we know that the abovementioned activities are quite different in nature, and they need to be investigated via a further deconstruction. They can be illegal – that is, going against legal codes, informal – that is legal in their nature but concealed from the state, immoral – going against either public morale or morality defined by one or several groups embedded in state structures.

The interplay and interactions among actors, institutions and networks involved in these activities, are still under-explored and under-conceptualised: this volume has been conceived as an attempt to fill this gap.

Initially considered marginal (and often invisible) practices performed by a minority of peripheral actors, recent studies – often inspired by a framework developed by Scott (1984, 2012) - have emphasised their importance in shaping various forms of governance in spite of/beyond the state (Morris 2012; Polese and Morris 2015; Polese et al. 2016; Polese 2016; Russo 2016; Strazzari 2012, 2013).

The volume is organised around three main themes:

The social morality of crime
Top-down approaches to the fight of organised crime see a pivotal role for the state (criminal justice, intelligence, police and the army). However such approaches often overlook the social and economic embeddedness of organised crime, and its relevance for a number of communities and individuals whose daily survival is at stake. Organised crime does not take place in a social and political vacuum, but rather is deeply entrenched in social structures and networks as it provides an alternative to formal authority and formal economic structures.
There are, thus, large numbers of people who make a living thanks to the structures and networks liaising with or rooted in criminal organisations. As a result, criminal organisations are not only tolerated but potentially widely supported. At the same time, the state apparatus (and its national and local representatives) should not be considered by default as an institution engaged in an all-out war on “illegality”: on the contrary, it is worthy studying in-depth its commitment to selective forms of pressure and fight against informal and criminal activity. The existence of areas of tolerance, connivance and collusion needs to be explained.

Opposition of “us” (the people, often informally organised) against “them” (the elites, formally representing the state)
The romanticisation of the role of the criminals and outlaws can support a narrative of “us” (the people) against “them” (the state), especially in instances where state capacity is weak and informal criminal structures provide governance. This can lead to justifying illegal activities against the state as a way to contest it and participate in political processes.
Mechanisms for informal resistance towards the state can be both passive (non-compliance) and active (actions that harm the state and contrast or deny its material and symbolic power). Social support of actions classified as illegal contributes to the construction of a societal narrative opposed to the one promoted by the state and through which excluded or marginalised actors play a role in the political field (Gupta 1995).

Informality and resistance
We see a continuity between informal actions and practices and contestation of state structures and institutions, especially because resistance to the state’s authority and power often occur informally. Informal resistance is developed, for example, through instances of “infrapolitics” (Scott 2012b), that is, the simultaneous actions performed by a number of individuals in the same manner - unaware that other people are acting in the same way.
In other words, a social or protest movement can exist for a long time unaware of being part of a broader phenomenon. Infrapolitics can evolve into a more defined movement, with a leader and a common ideology, or simply remain in the shadow; similarly, resistance can take the form of contentious politics or move further. Interestingly, this pattern may apply to the emergence and development of insurgent and terrorist organisations.


Please send a 300 word abstract and a short biographical note to:


Perspective authors are welcome to contact the editors to discuss their proposal. We promise to give full consideration to abstracts received by the 15th of October 2016.
Date Posted: Tue, 13 Sep 2016

Literary Journal Seeking Slavic Translations

With a deadline of November 30, Underpass is issuing a special call for submissions. We’re open to submissions of short stories, narrative nonfiction, and excerpts from longer work that have been translated from any Slavic language into English. We’re particularly interested in great writing that provides English-speaking readers a window into new countries, neighborhoods, cultures, perspectives.
To submit:
  • Send a Word document of the English language version (By November 30)
  • Include a PDF document of the submission in the original language.
  • Include a short author bio and a translator bio in English.
  • All submission should be sent electronically to submissions@underpass.co.
  • Detailed submissions guidelines can be found on the website at http://underpass.co/Home/Submissions.
We will accept work that has been previously published in the original language or in English and all rights revert to authors upon publication. While November 30 is the deadline for the special edition, we will accept submissions rolling basis.  
Questions? Email us at editor@underpass.co.
Date Posted: Thu, 08 Sep 2016

Call for Papers: The 2017 Annual Soyuz Symposium "Embracing Confusion and Questioning Clarity: on Matters of Method in Postsocialist Studies" [DL Oct. 15, 2016]

Call for Papers
The 2017 Annual Soyuz Symposium
Embracing Confusion and Questioning Clarity: on Matters of Method in Postsocialist Studies
Russian and East European Institute
Indiana University Bloomington
March 3-4, 2017
 
Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies invites presentation proposals for the 2017 symposium hosted by the Russian and East European Institute at Indiana University Bloomington. We are seeking research papers and visual presentations (including, but not limited to documentary and ethnographic films) that engage with the issues of methodology in the postsocialist world broadly defined, encompassing  East-Central Europe and the Former Soviet Union, as well as Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Our goal is to foster conversations about knowledge production in the field of postsocialist studies that spans generations of researchers: from graduate students and junior scholars to senior professionals. The 2017 Soyuz Symposium theme Embracing Confusion and Questioning Clarity is inspired by the immense and somewhat untapped potential that postsocialist studies have to offer to methodological conversations in social sciences. In our view, a more vibrant scholarly exchange will aid current compartmentalization of much scholarship into global North and South and produce new analytical categories. Recent resurgence of Cold War ideologies in Europe has ushered a renewed interest in this region on the part of policy makers, funding organizations, and academic programs, and we want to invite scholars of postsocialism to provide their critical commentary on the issues that have accompanied these geopolitical shifts.

Embracing Confusion and Questioning Clarity theme encourages presenters to consider questions they have faced and discoveries they have made on a journey from conceiving a research idea to their interpretation of findings. In what ways have postsocialist transformations and the scholarly analyses that followed posed a challenge to long-standing social scientific categories, methods and theories? What portable analytical categories and methodological insights have postsocialist studies yielded? How have our methodological frameworks and research questions changed in the last decades? Which conversations, interpretive frames, and collaborative processes were beneficial and which were not? What sorts of creative responses have scholars of postsocialism generated to navigate confusing times? And how do insights gleaned by earlier generations of researchers translate, travel and land in the world nearly thirty years removed from the iconic fall of the Berlin Wall?

Invited themes include, but are not limited to the following: creating knowledge about a space; methodologies of data collection and analysis; fieldwork events; analysis of state narratives and discourses; interpretation of contested histories; conducting policy-relevant research; writing in social sciences, and others. As always, at Soyuz, other topics of research on postsocialism that are not directly related to this theme are also welcome. We will invite selected papers for publication as a special issue in one of the relevant journals. Partial funding might be available for graduate students, please indicate if you'd like to be considered in your materials.

Abstracts of up to 250 words should be sent to Soyuz board at bazyma01@luther.edu by October 15, 2016.
Please include your full name, affiliation, and paper title. Write “Soyuz 2017” in the subject line of your email. Papers will be selected and notifications made by December 1, 2016.

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary forum for exchanging work based on field research in postsocialist countries, ranging from Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union to Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Soyuz is an interest group in the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and an official unit of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES). The Soyuz symposium has met annually since 1991 and offers an opportunity for scholars to interact in a more personal setting. More information on the Soyuz Research Network can be found at the website.

Date Posted: Tue, 06 Sep 2016

CfP: "Reluctant heritage: Revisiting museums and memory sites in Central and Eastern Europe in a transnational perspective", Bucharest, CEREFREA, 4-5 November 2016 [DL: September 15th]

A troubled and segmented East-European history has given rise to a troubled and segmented museum history. Museums in Central and Eastern Europe have found themselves, time and again, faced with difficult and uncomfortable choices. Immediately after the Second World War, museums had to update their exhibitions in order to narrate radically different stories. One of the major changes also included exhibiting the socialist present, such as the accomplishments of the regime, and the recent past: the violent, revolutionary coming to power of communist parties all over Eastern Europe became part of the permanent exhibition of local and national museums. Museums also had to literally hide entire collections that were suddenly found inappropriate. After the fall of communism, these collections were brought back to museum halls (although much of their history, documentation and context had been lost) and it was time for the communist collections to become bothersome and thus be hidden or even destroyed.

The workshop seeks to explore the specificities of reaction to political and social change in the context of museums and heritage sites. Museums could be considered in terms of their historiographic and political foundations, as the outcome of mobilizations of a wide variety of actors who have contributed to their creation or their dismantling (museum professionals, architects, academics, public historians, victims’ associations and other cultural brokers). In some contexts, the heritage process has contributed to a discursive criminalisation of previous regimes – for instance the transformation of detention centres in museums or memory sites. In others, it has facilitated implicit forms of rehabilitation, under the guise of commercially exploiting the legacy – architectural, artistic, political – of the former regime. Finally, a significant number of museums and memory sites were faced with the challenge and task of reinvesting their collections with a new meaning and a new narrative, framed in new historiographies and nation-building projects.

Within this framework, our workshop will bring together contributions that respond to one or more of the following aspects, relating to the central concern on whether museum displays and heritage sites have been remade to conform to new scientific and political narratives/ agendas:

- will examine case-studies of metamorphoses of East-European museums and built heritage during the Cold War and in post-communism. 
- will discuss whether museums are sometimes in the vanguard of social and political change or are they merely reacting to societal transformations.
- will analyse how museums and heritage sites have been mobilized to qualify, and at times to criminalize the socialist period
- will seek to highlight the emergence and circulation of heritage models at national, regional and trans-regional levels, evident in the museums established in former detention centres, in the management of heritage assets related to past dictatorial regimes, and in the reconfigurations of exhibitions in museums around the area. 
- will expand the debate by bringing case-studies of transnational processes going beyond the European borders (with a particular interest in Latin America)
- will bring theoretical and methodological insights into the study of processes of heritage-making from a transnational perspective.

Please submit 300-word abstracts and a short bio (in English or in French) to reluctantheritage@gmail.com by September 15th. The successful participants will be notified by September 20th. 

While the conference will be bilingual, in English and French, no simultaneous translation will be provided. 

Funds are available to cover the expenses (travel or accommodation) for a limited number of participants. Please indicate in your paper proposal whether you will be seeking this funding.

Convenors:
Gruia Bădescu, University of Oxford
Simina Bădică, National Museum of the Romanian Peasant
Nelly Bekus, University of Exeter
Damiana Oțoiu, University of Bucharest

The workshop is organized by the Regional Center for Advanced Francophone Research in Social Sciences (CEREFREA Villa Noël), University of Bucharest and supported by the following institutions and projects: 
- Museums and Controversial Collections. Politics and Policies of Heritage-Making in Post-Colonial and Post-socialist Contexts project of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research and Innovation, CNCS – UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-2368, New Europe College, Bucharest.
- AHRC (Care for the Future) - LABEX Pasts in the Present joint funded project The Criminalization of Dictatorial Pasts in Europe and Latin America in Global Perspective, University of Exeter and Institut des Sciences Sociales du Politique, Paris.
- Political Science Department, University of Bucharest.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/326636824342738/

Date Posted: Fri, 19 Aug 2016

Conferences & Workshops

"THE HERITAGES OF MIGRATION" DATES: APRIL 6-10, 2017Conference in Buenos Aires

Conference Dates: 6 – 10 April 2017

Call for Papers: Deadline 14 October 2016

Papers will be accepted in English and Spanish / Los resúmenes se reciben en español y en inglés.

Online submission form: www.universityofbirmingham.submittable.com

Contact: Hannah Stretton, Ironbridge@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Download the Call for Papers here: Heritages of Migration Postcard

View the Call for Papers in Spanish here.

Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home

The early colonization of the Americas represented the layering of cultures and new inscriptions of place. Today we see conceptions of the stability of ‘old world’ that have been challenged by centuries of two-way flows of people and objects, each engendering new meanings, allowing for new interpretations of landscape, the production of identities and generating millions of stories. The emergence of the ‘new world’ in opposition to the old – in real, imaginary and symbolic terms  – problematizes sense of place and induces consideration of a ‘placelessness’ as a location for ideas of home, memory and belonging. This conference looks at the actors and processes that produce and reconfigure the old world in the new, and the new world in the old across the Atlantic – north and south – through constructions of heritage in material and immaterial form.  Its focus is upon the widely conceived Trans-Atlantic but we also welcome contributions that focus on the heritages of migration from around the world.

Held at the National Museum of Immigration, Buenos Aires, Argentina – a country that itself has seen mass immigration – this conference asks:

  • What objects and practices do migrants value and carry with them in their movements between old and new worlds?
  • How do people negotiate and renegotiate their “being in the world” in the framework of migration?
  • How is memory enacted through material culture and heritage into new active domains?
  • What stories are told and how are they transmitted within and between migrant communities  and generations?
  • How is the concept of home made meaningful in a mobile world?
  • Where do performances of identity “take place” so as to generate new landscapes of collective memory?
  • How do the meanings of place and placelessness change over generations from an initial migration?

The conference is designed encourage provocative dialogue across the fullest range of disciplines Thus we welcome papers from academic colleagues in fields such as anthropology, archaeology, art history, architecture, business, communication, ethnology, heritage studies, history, geography, literary studies, media studies, museum studies, popular culture, postcolonial studies, sociology, tourism, and urban studies.

Indicative topics of interest to the conference include:

  • The heritage of trans-Atlantic encounters – ways and means of crossing distances
  • Performing place and new inscriptions of placelessness
  • Migration and urban territories – settlement processes and practices
  • Travelling intangible heritages – the rituals, practices, festivals of home away
  • Diasporic heritage communities
  • Migrating memories
  • Representations of migration/immigration in popular culture

How to submit your abstract

You can submit your abstract by using our online form. This can be accessed from the ‘Submit’ button on the homepage or by following this link: www.universityofbirmingham.submittable.com

If you have any difficulty with the online submission form, please email Hannah Stretton at Ironbridge@contacts.bham.ac.uk.

Submission Guidelines 

  • Your abstract should be no more than 300 words and should be uploaded in Word or PDF format.
  • Please include title, author names and affiliated organisations / universities
  • Please do not include any contact details on your abstract document, you can fill these in separately using our online form. All abstracts received by the deadline will be reviewed by the Conference Committee.
Date Posted: Thu, 22 Sep 2016

CfP: Young Researchers Conference: Centennial, Commemoration, Catastrophe: 1917-2017 as Past and Present in Russia and Beyond

Centennial, Commemoration, Catastrophe: 1917-2017 as Past and Present in Russia and Beyond
Young Researchers Conference, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Miami University
13-16 June 2017. Villa Vergiliana, Cuma, Italy

Discussing the Russian revolution is impossible without addressing the causes, legacy, and echoes of this event. The very phrasing is contentious—was 1917 a revolution, overthrow, or accident? Examining the Russian and Soviet response is complex enough, yet the Bolshevik takeover had ramifications for the world. In literature the image of the revolution and the ensuing changes was polarized from the beginning, both in the new Soviet state and abroad. Those in history and the social sciences have long puzzled over interpreting the USSR, its influence on Eastern Europe (and the developing world), and the aftermath of its collapse. In otherwise disparate regions—from eastern Germany to Central Asia and the Russian Far East—1917 and the USSR defined the twentieth century, whether as horrific trauma, utopian promises, or a confounding combination of the two. How our field responds to the Russian revolution will define Eurasian studies for the coming decades, just as experts continue to debate the significance of other cultural markers such as 1905, 1956, and 1989.
The Young Researchers Conferences welcomes papers by scholars of literature, history, political science, anthropology, cultural studies, art history, gender studies, religion, and similar areas, as well as fields not traditionally represented at Eurasian studies conferences (for example, Middle Eastern studies, psychology). Papers should examine how 1917 influenced events in politics, economics, literature, religion, art, or culture, whether in the former Second World or beyond its borders.

The conference will feature the following keynote speakers:
Catriona Kelly (Oxford)
Boris Kolonitskii (European University at St. Petersburg)

Eligibility:
The Young Researchers Conference welcomes papers from those who are completing their dissertation or have received their Ph.D. (or candidate degree) within the past three years.

Form of the Conference:
Participants will prepare a paper to be circulated well in advance and read by all conference presenters, chairs, and discussants. During the conference presenters will have 15 minutes to summarize their findings. The small number of participants and mix of junior and senior scholars make the Young Researchers Conference an excellent venue for both advancing research projects and networking with leading and upcoming figures in a wide range of fields. The working language of the conference is English.

Submitting Abstracts and CVs:
Please submit by November 21, 2016 a one-page, single-spaced abstract (including tentative bibliography) as well as a one page, singled-spaced curriculum vitae to Benjamin Sutcliffe, Professor of Russian, Miami University:sutclibm@miamioh.edu Participants will be notified by January 15 if they have been selected for the conference.

Financial Support:
The conference will be held in Cuma, Italy, which is located on the Bay of Naples, one hour drive from Naples, and an hour and a half from Capri. The train ride from Rome’s Termini train station is about 1-1/2 hours.  The Havighurst Center will provide all meals and 3 nights (shared room) at the Villa Vergiliana in Cuma. Participants will be responsible for all travel to and from the Villa, including international travel. Scholars are urged to seek support from their institutions.
Date Posted: Thu, 22 Sep 2016

CfP: Arts and Cultural Diplomacy - Europe and Russia, 1945-2017

East-West Cultural Relations: Interplay of Arts and Cultural Diplomacy, 1945-2017
February 24-25, 2017, University of Jyväskylä, Finland        
 
Keynote lectures by
Boris Gasparov (Columbia University) and Giles Scott-Smith (Leiden University)
 
Scholars and practitioners interested in cultural diplomacy are invited to submit proposals for papers and for panels that address East-West cultural relations-either from historical or contemporary points of view. In this conference, 'East' and 'West' are broadly understood as the Eastern and Western parts of Europe, Russia and the Soviet Union.
 
East-West Cultural Relations seeks to strengthen the research of cultural exchanges across national borders. It explores and raises awareness of the state of cultural relations and diplomacy between Eastern and Western Europe. The conference aims to reflect on the East-West cultural connections from the Second World War to today. Its main focus is on artistic movements and exchanges between (and possibly within) the East and West.
 
Important background information is revealed through the current situation in which cultural exchanges are becoming more difficult-especially under strained relations between Russia and the EU. Furthermore, facilitating the transnational mobility of artworks and artists at a time of diminishing public support is increasingly challenging, underlining the need to reflect on the development of cultural interactions in Europe. The rise of nationalist discourse throughout Europe also challenges the shared cultural heritage and history of Eastern and Western Europe, which calls the benefits of cultural exchange into question.
 
The primary goal of this two-day conference is to serve scholarly needs, but also to encourage collaboration and foster dialogues between scholars and cultural diplomacy practitioners. We invite proposals for papers, panels, seminars and workshops that address themes including but not limited to:
.       How have artistic relations evolved in Europe since the beginning of the Cold War?
.       How has cultural diplomacy developed in an East-West setting since the beginning of the Cold War? What are the aims of cultural diplomatic actions?
.       What is the state of cultural relations between the East and West today? What are the current challenges and needs? Are there any historical precedents for the current situation?
.       What kinds of relationships or dialogues have existed between cultural diplomacy and artistic interactions and art practices in the East and West?
.       How can scholarship on cultural exchanges help practitioners-e.g. diplomats, administrators and art professional?
 
Over the course of this two-day conference, scholars will share their research findings, offer examples of cutting-edge approaches and engage in dynamic discussions that will help nurture intercultural dialogue and bridge scholarly and practical question.
 
Learn more: ewcr2017.wordpress.com also in twitter: #EastWest2017
 
Proposal materials must be submitted by 24.10.2016. Please send all materials to ewcr2017@gmail.com. Accepted proposals will be notified by 4.11.2016. Materials intended for pre-circulation should be received no later than 31.1.2017. The conference has no participation fee. Also, few scholarships will be offered for presenters arriving from countries of lower income. Contact ewcr2017@gmail.com for any questions.
 
Conference is hosted by Simo Mikkonen, the Department of History and Ethnology, University of Jyväskylä. Conference is part of the project Trauma & Revival coordinated by the Centre for Fine Arts, Brussels (BOZAR) and receives EU-funding from Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA).
Date Posted: Wed, 14 Sep 2016

2016 Conference on Central Asian Languages and Linguistics, "Continuing the Journey: Strengthening the Central Asian Language Community"

2016 Conference on Central Asian Languages and Linguistics
Continuing the Journey: Strengthening the Central Asian Language Community
October 7-9, 2016
Indiana University
Early Registration Deadline: September 9, 2016
 
This fall, the Center for Languages of the Central Asian Region (CeLCAR) will be hosting the Second Conference on Central Asian Languages and Linguistics (ConCALL-2) at Indiana University from October 7-9, 2016.
ConCALL-2 was established in Spring 2014 as a scholarly research and professional development conference for linguists and language educators specializing in the languages of the Central Asian region, including both the Altaic and Eastern Indo-European languages spoken in the region, a diverse range of languages such as Azerbaijani, Dari, Kazakh, Mongolian, Pashto, Persian, Tajiki, Tibetan, Turkish, Tuvan, Uyghur, Uzbek, and more! (Click here to see map)
 
The main goal of ConCALL is to bring together experts across the fields to focus on research into how these specific languages are represented formally, as well as acquired by second/foreign language learners and also to present research driven teaching methods.
 
This year’s theme is “Continuing the Journey: Strengthening the Central Asian Language Community”. Submissions could be on phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition (L1 and L2), as well as language pedagogy as concerns a Central Asian language (click on the map below for languages represented).
Date Posted: Wed, 07 Sep 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS Southern Conference on Slavic Studies April 6-8, 2017 DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS: January 15, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS
55th Annual Meeting
Southern Conference on Slavic Studies

Alexandria, VA

April 6-8, 2017
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS: January 15, 2017

 

The Fifty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies (SCSS) will be held at the Westin Alexandria Hotel in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia, April 6-8, 2017. The meeting will be hosted by George Mason University’s program in Russian and Eurasian Studies. The SCSS is the largest of the regional Slavic and Eurasian Studies associations and its programs attract national and international scholarly participation.  The purpose of SCSS is to promote scholarship, education, and in all other ways to advance scholarly interest in Russian, Soviet, and East European studies in the Southern region of the United States and nationwide. Membership in SCSS is open to all persons interested in furthering these goals. 

Papers from all humanities and social science disciplines are welcome, as is a focus on countries other than Russia/USSR. We encourage participation from scholars of all Slavic, East European, and Eurasian regions. Papers can be on any time period and any topic relevant to these regions. Papers on the special theme of the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917 are especially welcome.

The program committee is accepting panel and paper proposals until January 15, 2017. Whole panel proposals (chair, three papers, discussant) are preferred, but proposals for individual papers will also be accepted. Whole panel proposals should include the titles of each individual paper as well as a title for the panel itself and identifying information (email address and brief CV with institutional affiliation) for all participants. Proposals for individual papers should include email address, brief CV with institutional affiliation, paper title, and a one-paragraph abstract to guide the program committee in the assembly of panels.  If any AV equipment will be needed, the panel and paper proposals should indicate so when they are submitted.  AV will be of limited availability and assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.  Email your proposals to Emily Baran at emily.baran@mtsu.edu. If necessary, you may also send it by conventional post to:

Dr. Emily B. Baran

Department of History

Middle Tennessee State University

MTSU Box 23

1301 E. Main Street

Murfreesboro, TN 37132

Date Posted: Tue, 06 Sep 2016

2017 Jack and Anita Hess Seminar for Faculty: Gender and Sexuality in the Holocaust

UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies


2017 Jack and Anita Hess Seminar for Faculty: 
Gender and Sexuality in the Holocaust

January 9-13, 2017

The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum announces the 2017 Jack and Anita Hess Seminar for college and university faculty from all disciplines who are teaching or preparing to teach Holocaust or Holocaust-related courses (such as comparative genocide, victims studies, etc.).

This year’s Seminar will focus on gender and sexuality in order to strengthen and expand the participants’ knowledge of how social understandings of gender norms and human sexuality affected the lives of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Holocaust. Using a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, the participants will examine where men’s and women’s Holocaust experiences mirrored one another and where they differed, as well as the ways in which the Nazi system redefined—and in some cases shattered—traditional gender roles. Over the course of this seminar, participants will explore how Nazi gender norms and perceptions of sexuality influenced the persecution experiences of Jews who came under German control. They will also examine how National Socialist thinking shaped the ideologies of sexuality, race, and gender that justified the violent exclusion of other, “non-Aryan” groups from the idealized German national body. The themes covered will include, but are not limited to: prewar persecution and women’s vulnerability; sexual violence; and the emasculation of “non-Aryan, untermenschen; forced sterilization; eugenics; instrumental sex; rape; reproductive experimentation; sex work and sex slavery in the military and concentration camps; the linkages between sexuality and race in Nazi ideology; the legislation of human desire; understandings of homosexuality; representations of masculinity and femininity in Nazi rhetoric; voyeurism and public shaming; the tension between passionate camaraderie, homoeroticism, and homosexuality in the numerous all-male institutions in Nazi Germany.”

This Seminar is designed for faculty of all academic disciplines. While the Seminar will focus on the specific case of the Holocaust, the themes, approaches, and methods that the seminar covers are more broadly applicable for educators who engage the perspectives of victims and survivors in other geographic regions or periods of time, as well as those working in LGBTQ studies, women’s history, gender studies, etc. 

The Seminar will be held at the United States Holocaust Museum from January 9–13, 2015. It will be co-led by Dagmar Herzog, Distinguished Professor of History and the Daniel Rose Faculty scholar at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York, and Annette Timm, Associate Professor of History at the University of Calgary. Dr. Herzog’s scholarship has examined the role of sexuality in Europe and America and its relation to politics, especially under fascism and in its wake. She has also published widely on gender, theology, and women’s rights. Dr. Herzog is currently analyzing points where psychoanalysis and the social sciences meet. She has written a number of works, including, Cold War Freud: Psychoanalysis in an Age of Catastrophes (2016); Sexuality in Europe: A Twentieth- Century History (2011); Sex in Crisis: The New Sexual Revolution and the Future of American Politics (2008); and Sex after Fascism: Memory and Morality in Twentieth-Century Germany (2005).  She has also edited the collections, Brutality and Desire: War and Sexuality in Europe’s Twentieth Century (2009); and Sexuality and German Fascism (2004). Dr. Timm has written and lectured widely about sexuality, population policy, gender, marriage counseling, and sexual duty. Her published works include, The Politics of Fertility in Twentieth-Century Berlin (2010) and Gender, Sex, and the Shaping of Modern Europe: A History from the French Revolution to the Present Day, co-authored with Joshua Sanborn (2007 & 2016). Dr. Timm’s chapter, “Mothers, Whores or Sometimes Dupes? Emotion and Race in Historiographical Debates about Women in the Third Reich,” in Beyond the Racial State, is forthcoming. She is also one of the editors of, Holocaust History and the Readings of Ka-Tzetnik, which is under contract with Bloomsbury Press. 

Professors Herzog and Timm will share insight from their own work, lead participants in discussions, and help participants prepare syllabi for their upcoming classes. Museum staff and visiting scholars working on related subjects will also lead sessions in their areas of expertise. Participants will be introduced to the numerous resources available at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum that can easily be used in their classrooms, such as Experiencing History, the Museum’s digital humanities project; the digitized archives; photo and film archives; and the oral history collection. Participants will also have access to Museum staff and visiting fellows with whom they can consult about their classes and Holocaust-related projects. 

Candidates must be faculty members of accredited, baccalaureate-awarding institutions in North America.  Applications must include a curriculum vitae, a short statement of the candidate's specific interest in and need to attend the Seminar, and a supporting letter from a departmental chair or dean detailing the Holocaust-related courses that the candidate is teaching or planning and the support that the university is providing for Holocaust studies at the institution.  If the applicant has already taught an applicable course, a syllabus should be included.
 
Admission will be decided without regard to the age, gender, race, creed, or national origin of the candidate.  A maximum of 20 applicants will be accepted.  For non-local participants, the Mandel Center will defray the cost of (1) direct travel to and from the participant’s home institution and Washington, DC, and (2) lodging for the duration of the Seminar.  Incidentals, meals, and book expenses must be defrayed by the candidates or their respective institutions.  All participants must attend the entire Seminar.
 
Applications must be postmarked or received in electronic form no later than Tuesday, November 1, 2016 and sent to:
 
University Programs
Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW
Washington, DC 20024-2150
Fax: (202) 479-9726       Email: university_programs@ushmm.org
 
For questions, contact Dr. Kierra Crago-Schneider at 202-314-1779 or kcrago-schneider@ushmm.org.  Accepted applicants will be notified of the results of the selection process by Friday, November 18, 2016.
 
This Seminar is endowed by Edward and David Hess in memory of their parents, Jack and Anita Hess, who believed passionately in the power of education to overcome racial and religious prejudice.

Date Posted: Fri, 19 Aug 2016

CfP: "Reluctant heritage: Revisiting museums and memory sites in Central and Eastern Europe in a transnational perspective", Bucharest, CEREFREA, 4-5 November 2016 [DL: September 15th]

A troubled and segmented East-European history has given rise to a troubled and segmented museum history. Museums in Central and Eastern Europe have found themselves, time and again, faced with difficult and uncomfortable choices. Immediately after the Second World War, museums had to update their exhibitions in order to narrate radically different stories. One of the major changes also included exhibiting the socialist present, such as the accomplishments of the regime, and the recent past: the violent, revolutionary coming to power of communist parties all over Eastern Europe became part of the permanent exhibition of local and national museums. Museums also had to literally hide entire collections that were suddenly found inappropriate. After the fall of communism, these collections were brought back to museum halls (although much of their history, documentation and context had been lost) and it was time for the communist collections to become bothersome and thus be hidden or even destroyed.

The workshop seeks to explore the specificities of reaction to political and social change in the context of museums and heritage sites. Museums could be considered in terms of their historiographic and political foundations, as the outcome of mobilizations of a wide variety of actors who have contributed to their creation or their dismantling (museum professionals, architects, academics, public historians, victims’ associations and other cultural brokers). In some contexts, the heritage process has contributed to a discursive criminalisation of previous regimes – for instance the transformation of detention centres in museums or memory sites. In others, it has facilitated implicit forms of rehabilitation, under the guise of commercially exploiting the legacy – architectural, artistic, political – of the former regime. Finally, a significant number of museums and memory sites were faced with the challenge and task of reinvesting their collections with a new meaning and a new narrative, framed in new historiographies and nation-building projects.

Within this framework, our workshop will bring together contributions that respond to one or more of the following aspects, relating to the central concern on whether museum displays and heritage sites have been remade to conform to new scientific and political narratives/ agendas:

- will examine case-studies of metamorphoses of East-European museums and built heritage during the Cold War and in post-communism. 
- will discuss whether museums are sometimes in the vanguard of social and political change or are they merely reacting to societal transformations.
- will analyse how museums and heritage sites have been mobilized to qualify, and at times to criminalize the socialist period
- will seek to highlight the emergence and circulation of heritage models at national, regional and trans-regional levels, evident in the museums established in former detention centres, in the management of heritage assets related to past dictatorial regimes, and in the reconfigurations of exhibitions in museums around the area. 
- will expand the debate by bringing case-studies of transnational processes going beyond the European borders (with a particular interest in Latin America)
- will bring theoretical and methodological insights into the study of processes of heritage-making from a transnational perspective.

Please submit 300-word abstracts and a short bio (in English or in French) to reluctantheritage@gmail.com by September 15th. The successful participants will be notified by September 20th. 

While the conference will be bilingual, in English and French, no simultaneous translation will be provided. 

Funds are available to cover the expenses (travel or accommodation) for a limited number of participants. Please indicate in your paper proposal whether you will be seeking this funding.

Convenors:
Gruia Bădescu, University of Oxford
Simina Bădică, National Museum of the Romanian Peasant
Nelly Bekus, University of Exeter
Damiana Oțoiu, University of Bucharest

The workshop is organized by the Regional Center for Advanced Francophone Research in Social Sciences (CEREFREA Villa Noël), University of Bucharest and supported by the following institutions and projects: 
- Museums and Controversial Collections. Politics and Policies of Heritage-Making in Post-Colonial and Post-socialist Contexts project of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research and Innovation, CNCS – UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-2368, New Europe College, Bucharest.
- AHRC (Care for the Future) - LABEX Pasts in the Present joint funded project The Criminalization of Dictatorial Pasts in Europe and Latin America in Global Perspective, University of Exeter and Institut des Sciences Sociales du Politique, Paris.
- Political Science Department, University of Bucharest.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/326636824342738/

Date Posted: Fri, 19 Aug 2016

CESS 2016 Panelist Needed, "Armed Organizations in Eurasia"

We are seeking a third panelist for a panel at the upcoming CESS in Princeton in November 2016 on "Armed Organizations in Eurasia: Cossacks and Streltsy from 16th Century to Post-Socialist Times." The original panelist who was to present on the Streltsy in the 16th century is unable to participate. We would welcome a paper on Cossacks or Streltsy in Eurasia with either a historical or contemporary focus. The current panelists are:

Dimitri Tolkatsch, Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg, "The New 'Cossacks' in Revolutionary Ukraine"

Margarete Zimmerman, University of Jena, "Cossacks and Kazakhs: National Conflicts and Religious Solutions"

Philip Gleissner will serve as chair, and I will be the discussant. 

The panel is scheduled for Saturday, November 5, 2016 at 11:00-12:45.

If you are interested, please let me know asap: kenwors@miamioh.edu

Dr. Scott M. Kenworthy, Associate Professor 
Dept of Comparative Religion
Miami University, Oxford OH 45056

Date Posted: Thu, 11 Aug 2016

Summer/ language Opportunities

Arizona State University Critical Languages Institute: Study Abroad and Summer Language Opportuities

The Arizona State University Critical Languages Institute is accepting applications for its 2017 summer language programs in the U.S. and abroad.
 
CLI offers intensive courses in less commonly taught languages in the U.S. and overseas.
 
Students admitted to CLI pay a flat fee of $900 for up to 13 semester credits, in addition to study-abroad fees if they opt to study overseas.
 
Scholarships are available for undergraduate students, graduate students, and non-students: Department of State Title VIII Fellowships for selected languages, ROTC Project GO Scholarships for selected languages; Melikian Scholarships for all languages, and language-specific support for several languages. See http://cli.asu.edu for details.
 
Admission is competitive. The Deadline for funding and priority admission is January 27, 2017 (Jan 17 for Project GO).
 
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THE ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY CRITICAL LANGUAGES INSTITUTE
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COMBINATION COURSES: 
2 months intensive study at ASU with optional 1 month study in country, providing 8–13 academic credits.
 
  -   Albanian                           (ASU + Tirana)
  -   Armenian                         (ASU + Yerevan)
  -   Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian(ASU + Sarajevo)
  -   Modern Hebrew               (ASU only)
  -   Indonesian                        (ASU + Bali)
  -   Persian                              (ASU only)
  -   Polish                               (ASU only)
  -   Russian                             (ASU + Bishkek or St. Petersburg)
  -   Turkish                             (ASU only )
  -   Uzbek                               (ASU + Tashkent)
 
Sessions in ASU include daily co-curricular programming, grant mentoring and career planning opportunities.
 
Sessions abroad feature academically challenging study, extensive co-curricular programming integrated into academic coursework and conducted in 1-on-1 or small-group format by local activity guides.
 
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OVERSEAS PROGRAMS
2-month intensive programs providing 8–10 academic credits
  -  Albanian (Tirana)               2nd-year and up
  -  Armenian (Yerevan)          2nd-year and up
  -  BCS (Sarajevo)                  2nd-year and up
  -  Indonesian (Denpasar)       2nd-year and up
  -  Russian (Bishkek)              2nd–4th-year
  -  Russian (St. Petersburg)   5th–6th-year
 
Programs feature homestays, extensive co-curricular programming, integrated into academic coursework and conducted in 1-on1 or small-group format by local activity guides.
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APPLICATION DEADLINE: JANUARY 27, 2017
APPLICATION AND FULL DETAILS:  (http://cli.asu.edu)
-- Use your web browser to search the archives, control your subscription options, and more. Visit and bookmark the SEELANGS Web Interface at: http://seelangs(dot)wix(dot)com/seelangs

 

Date Posted: Thu, 22 Sep 2016

American Councils Balkan Language Initiative now accepting applications!

American Councils for International Education is currently accepting applications for spring 2017 semester Balkan Language Initiative.  The application deadline is October 15, 2016.
 
The American Councils Balkan Language Initiative provides graduate students, advanced undergraduates, working professionals, and scholars intensive individualized instruction in the languages of the Balkans. Participants may choose to study one of 5 regional languages including:
 
Albanian in Tirana, Albania
Bosnian in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgarian in Sofia, Bulgaria
Macedonian in Skopje, Macedonia
Serbian in Belgrade, Serbia or Podgorica, Montenegro
 
THIS PROGRAM OFFERS…
ü  Comprehensive, two-day pre-departure orientation in Washington, D.C. as well as on-site orientation in each host city;
ü  Expert faculty and classrooms of only 1 to 3 participants to maximize individual attention to each learner’s needs;
ü  15 hours per week of in-class target language instruction in grammar, phonetics, conversation, culture and area studies;
ü  Housing with carefully-vetted host families;
ü  U.S. academic credit (administered through Bryn Mawr College);
ü  Conversation partners who assist U.S. students with language learning;
ü  Creative excursions that go beyond typical tourist destinations and offer students new insights into the host country life and culture.
 
*Students admitted to the Balkan Language Initiative are eligible to receive financial support from a wide range of sources, including the U.S. Department of State (Title VIII), Boren, FLAS, and the American Councils Study Abroad Scholarship Fund.
 
APPLICATION & QUESTIONS
Prospective applicants should check the program website for more information and to access the online application. The application deadline for these programs is October 15, 2016. Please direct any questions regarding the application process to the AC Study Abroad Team (phone: 202-833-7522; email: outbound@americancouncils.org). 
Date Posted: Tue, 13 Sep 2016

American Councils Eurasian Regional Language Program now accepting applications!

American Councils for International Education is currently accepting applications for spring 2017 semester Eurasian Regional Language Program.  The application deadline is October 15, 2016.
 
The American Councils Eurasian Regional Language Program provides graduate students, advanced undergraduates, working professionals, and scholars intensive individualized instruction in the languages of Eurasia. Participants may choose from a wide range of regional languages, including: Armenian, Azeri, Bashkir, Buryat, Chechen, Dari, Farsi, Georgian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Pashto, Romanian, Tajiki, Tatar, Ukrainian, Uzbek, and Yakut.
 
ALL PROGRAMS OFFER…
 
ü  Comprehensive, two-day pre-departure orientation in Washington, D.C. as well as on-site orientation in each host city;
ü  Expert university faculty and classrooms of only 1 to 5 participants to maximize individual attention to each learner’s needs;
ü  15-18 hours per week of in-class target language instruction in grammar, phonetics, conversation, culture and area studies;
ü  Housing with carefully-vetted host families;
ü  U.S. academic credit (administered through Bryn Mawr College);
ü  Conversation partners who assist U.S. students with language learning;
ü  Creative excursions that go beyond typical tourist destinations and offer students new insights into the host country life and culture.
 
*Students admitted to the Eurasian Regional Language Program are eligible to receive financial support from a wide range of sources, including the U.S. Department of State (Title VIII), Boren, FLAS, and the American Councils Study Abroad Scholarship Fund.
 
APPLICATION & QUESTIONS
Prospective applicants should check the program website for more information and to access the online application. The application deadline for these programs is October 15, 2016. Please direct any questions regarding the application process to the AC Study Abroad Team (phone: 202-833-7522; email: outbound@americancouncils.org).
Date Posted: Tue, 13 Sep 2016

American Councils Russian Language Programs Accepting Applications

American Councils for International Education is currently accepting applications for spring 2017 semester Russian language study-abroad programs.  The application deadline is October 15, 2016 for the following programs:

Advanced Russian Language and Area Studies Program (RLASP)
RLASP offers participants the unique opportunity to study Russian language and area studies in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Vladimir or Almaty, while pursuing volunteer opportunities, internships, and cultural interests in an overseas immersion setting. 

(Language prerequisite: one year of Russian or higher.)

Business Russian Language and Internship Program (BRLI)
Combining intensive business language classes and an internship in Moscow or St. Petersburg, BRLI prepares Russian language students for a career in the international job market.

(Language prerequisite: two years of Russian or higher.)

Russian Heritage Speakers Program
The Russian Heritage Speakers Program is individually-customized to address the specific needs of students who grew up speaking Russian and wish to strengthen their language skills.

*Students admitted to American Councils programs are eligible to receive financial support from a wide range of sources, including the U.S. Department of State (Title VIII), Boren, FLAS, and the American Councils Study Abroad Scholarship Fund.

ALL PROGRAMS OFFER…

ü  Comprehensive, two-day pre-departure orientation in Washington, D.C. as well as on-site orientation in each host city;

ü  Expert university faculty and classrooms of only 1 to 5 participants to maximize individual attention to each learner’s needs;

ü  20 hours per week of in-class Russian language instruction in grammar, phonetics, conversation, political science and area studies;

ü  Housing in conveniently-located university dormitories or with carefully-vetted host families;

ü  U.S. academic credit (administered through Bryn Mawr College) for coursework in history or political science as well as advanced Russian language;

ü  Carefully managed, substantive internships at such locations as the Moscow Museum of Modern Art, the American Chamber of Commerce in Almaty, the Hermitage and the St. Petersburg Cultural Center;

ü  Conversation partners who assist U.S. students with language learning and help them find a niche in their university communities;

ü  Russian-American discussion groups that meet weekly to explore contemporary social mores and cultural issues;

ü  Creative weekly excursions that go beyond typical tourist destinations and offer students new insights into the host country life and culture;

ü  Extended trips (5-6 days) with Russian-speaking peers and faculty to explore new regions and cities, including such locations as Kizhi, Nizhni Novgorod, Pskov, and Volgograd (Russia); and Astana or Turkestan (Kazakhstan).

ABOUT OUR PROGRAMS

Operating since 1976, American Councils Russian-language programs are conducted in partnership with Moscow International University, the Russian State Pedagogical (Herzen) University in downtown St. Petersburg, the KORA Russian Language Center in Vladimir, and the Al Farabi Kazakh National University in Almaty. All American Councils programs are uniquely designed to maximize participants’ language gain by combining intensive, small-group instruction with a rich array of immersion activities to ensure participants break out of the ‘study abroad bubble’ and truly engage with local communities. Experienced resident directors provide 24-hour support and personal guidance to participants throughout their time abroad.

APPLICATION & QUESTIONS

Prospective applicants should check the program website for more information and to access the online application. The application deadline for these programs is October 15, 2016. Please direct any questions regarding the application process to the AC Study Abroad Team (phone: 202-833-7522; email: outbound@americancouncils.org).

Date Posted: Fri, 09 Sep 2016

Eastern Europe Awaits You! - Study Abroad Programs at the 650-year-old University of Pécs in Hungary

The University of Pécs, which is the oldest and one of the largest research universities in Hungary, has launched 21 new study abroad programs for U.S. students. We would love to welcome your students to these high quality Study Abroad programs to experience and enjoy all the cultural and educational benefits Eastern Europe can offer.

The University of Pécs has joined the IIE Generation Study Abroad program with the aim of providing U.S. students with an ideal Study Abroad destination offering a high quality education and other services.

We offer semester long programs taught in English in the following areas:

Psychology, International Relations, Business Administration, Applied Management, Architecture, Civil Engineering, Structural Engineering, Computer Science, English and American Studies, Nursing, Physiotherapy, Art History, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramic Design, Graphic Design and Music.

Further information about these programs can be found at: http://international.pte.hu/study-abroad-programmes

Students are not required to be able to speak Hungarian in order to participate in the Study Abroad programs. However, if they would like to, there is a possibility to take a Hungarian Language and Culture course designed for international students on 5 different levels.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Gyöngyi Pozsgai, PhD

International Relations Co-ordinator

Centre for International Relations

University of Pécs

Vasvári Pál u. 4.

7622 Pécs

pozsgai.gyongyi@pte.hu

Date Posted: Thu, 18 Aug 2016